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Full text of "Our College Times"

11 
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ZUG MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
ELIZAEETHTOWN COLLEGE 
ELIZABETHTOVVN, PENNA. 



NO- 



PriuatP ICtbrar^ 



LEWIS DAY ROSE 



Study to show thyself approved." — Paul 



REFERENCE 
MATERIAL 

FOR 

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USE ONLY 



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FACTORS PRODUCING AN IDEAL EDUCATION 8 

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF ESTHETICS 10 

PAN ON WALL STREET 12 

THE SCHOOL AND THE LIFE OF TODAY 14 

EDITORIALS 17 

CARD OF THANKS 18 

SCHOOL NOTES 18 

MR. DIKHM WINS PRIZE 19 

COLLKGE LECTURE COURSE FOR 191 1 — 12.... 20 

SOCIETY NEWS 20 

DEPARTMENT WORK 21 

ALUMNI 23 

EXCHANGES 25 

THE SITUATION IN MAINE 26 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 21 

BIBLE AND RELIGIOUS WORK 22 

AGRICULTURE 22 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT 23 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



EVERYBODY'S STORE 



ELTZABETHTOWN 
PENNA. 



Your needs supplied at 
satisfactory prices in Dry 
Goods, (jroceries, Keady- 
to-Wear Clothing for Men 
and Women of all ages, 
Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oil- 
Cloth, Shoes, Ktc. 

Polite attention. 

Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 




Agents for Made-to- 



CLOTHING 

International Tailoring Co. 
New York 

Star Tailoring Co. 

Chicago. 

American Ladies Tailoring Co. 

Chicago 

Up-to-Date Samples 

On Hand 



HERTZLER BROTHERS AND COMPANY 



W. S. SMITH. President. 



PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 



AARON H. MARTIN. Cashier. 



U. S. DEPOSITORY 



Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits Over SI45,000.00 

(ieneral Accounts Solicited. Interest paid on 
special deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 



W. S. Smith 
F. W. Groff 
H. 0. Olnder 



DIRECTORS 

Elmer W. Strickler 
J. S. RIsser 
Amos G. Coble 



Peter N. Rutt 
B. L. Geyer 
E. E. Coble 



Mention ( )iy Colle-e Tin-es When Writint;- 



f "The House of Good Clothes" 



! 




R A N D E G E E K IN C A I D & CO 
CLOTHES. 



Get tbat Ai tumn Suit or Overcoat otl your mind and on your back. A "High 
Art" Model will compliment your taste and your tailor. 

"THE STORE ACCOMMODATING" 

S. M. MYERS & CO., I'.^i 

CLOTHIERS. HATTERS AND FURNISHERS 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



E.^4.4.4. l'[gi;n!Bli!IH!IIIIHIIIiaia!l!!Billl!BIIIIBIIIHi:iilBriai!IIH;!l:IBI!llll! 




OES 






More and more T 

Elizabe t h t o -nr n 4> 

feet are getting 4, 

the habit of keep ^ 

ing comp'ny -with ■!• 

our Shoe Depart- 4. 

meut. There's a $ 

reason of course. 4" 

Prices very, very .I* 

easy on the purse T 

and easy on the J* 

feet. Shoes for •!• 

for the airhole ^ 

family. * 



Huntzberger-Winters Co. 

Department Store 
ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



This space is reserved for 
The ELIZABETHTOWN 
& MARIETTA ELEC- 
TRIC LIGHT CO. 






g COLUMBIAN and RED CRUSS f | WE EARNESTLY SOLICIT A 



i Heaters and 

" THE FINEST LINES MADE 



Ranges. 



f^:"^^^^ 




Jos. H. Rider & Son 



LIBERAL PATRONAGE 
FOR 

LUMBER 



AND MILL-WORK 

CciiUMit, Slate, 

Sackett Piaster Board, 

Patent Piaster, 

Kiiberoid Hooling, 

White Coat, 

Mapes & Miller's Fertilizer, 

Huberine Paint, 

and all kinds of 
ItiiildiiiK Material. 
We aim to pive a square deal that wdl 
merit your trade and friendship. 
Give us a trial. 

MUTH BROTHERS. 
KMZAHKIH TOWN, I'KNN.V. 



Mention Our College Times When ^^'ritiI1g 



HiillHiiiifl:';::B::aEfl»!B:>HBi!'iBii:Hil!iB:i!lli[liiliiiilBliii|n 
I GET THIS BIG ■ 

i POULTRY REFERENCE BOOK fi 

i 




s GREIDERS FINE CATALOG g 

Snnaua agad paapu g 

" b k pub shed f e pe en ed a e 1 x = 

^ ea and n ehabg esane yund and H 

a B H GKEIDER Box C RHEBMS PA ■ 

ITi ■laiiianB ■ ■ ■ubiuhhihiibih m 
J You Can Improve Your j* 



L/mMamlM: 



By Subscribing for |* 

THE BUSINESS EDUCATOR * 

% 

By Practicing from * 

THE ZANER METHOD MANUAL '» 

or By Attending '^ 

THE ZANERIAN COLLEGE * 



*• For Circulars. Prices, Etc. * 

t Apply to * 

I ZANER & BLOSER CO. | 

J Penmanship Specialists J 

« Columbus, - - Ohio t 



We Are Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
Made To Order 

Plain 
Clothing 

In This Country 



When in Lancaster it will pay 
you to visit ours, the only 
Ulothing Store in that city that 
has One Price to All and giyes 
discounts to none. See us for 



Men's Ready Made and 
Made to Order 

Clothing 

AND 

Furnishings 



Youlli's and Boys' 
Clothing 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Since I8.J4 at 
Centre Square, Next to City HaU 

Lancaster, Pa. 




UNDERWOOD 



S TANDAHD 

TYPEWRITER 

Over sixteen acres of floor 
space devoted to producing 

The Machine Y2ii Will EiS2tiially B^y 



Underv^ood Typewriter Company 

INCORPORATED 

Ne>v 'York, and Every^vHere 



(§m (Haih^t (FtmfB 



Elizabkthtown, Pa., October, 1911 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Elizatieth Myer Editor-in-Chief 

\V. K. (iish, '14 School Notes 

Mamie Keller, '12 (society News 

W. F. Eshelman, '12 Alumni Editor 

Leah M. Sheatfer, '09 Exchanges 

Ralph W. Schlosser, '11 Business Manager 

Daisv P. Rider, '10 Art Editor 



Published moothly during the school year. 

This paper will be sent continuously to old subscriber«>, so as not to break their tiles, and ar- 
rearages chargpil, unless notice to discontinue has been received at e.xpiration. 
Address all business comruunications to the Business Manager. 
Terms: 50 cents per year; single copies, 10 cents. 



IMPOR TANT ! S TUDENTS ! 
DO YOU KNOW THAT 

TT is only liecause of the kind patronage of our business and our profes. < 
•*• sional men in this town and elsewhere, that this magazine exists. Thej' 

liave indeed shown themselves friwids of Our College and of " Our Col- '• 
lege Times." i » 

Therefore, we justly and fairly may ask you, when about to buy any- 
thing, to consider first those who liy their advertising have made this maga- , • 
* k zine possii)le- 

Wt- have solicited only advertisers who are reliable in all respects- 

READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS 



i 



BUSINESS MANAGER OF "OUR COI^EGE TIMES 



Factors Producing An Ideal 
Education 



J. E. Myers. '14 



IT is remarkable to notice the 
views held by educators of the 
past with reference to the fac- 
tors conducive to an ideal education. 
Our modern views emphasize some 
factors that were almost entirey neg- 
lected in former times. 

It is a known fact that the body ex- 
erts a wonderful influence upon the 
mind and in turn the mind acts great- 
ly upon the functions of the body. 
Years ago the body was developed 
and respected but now the mind is re- 
spected, the body ignored. Both of 
these attitudes are wrong. The truth 
must be remembered that the physical 
underlies the mental and the mental 
should not be developed at the ex- 
pense of the physical. The ancient 
and modern views must rather be com- 
bined. As soon as all people realize 
that, in pursuing the mental develop- 
ment, the preservation of health is a 
duty, then will this diffusion of belief 
be settled. To obtain the physical 
ideal great care must be exercised in 
food, clothing, exercise and in men- 
tal application. The proper amount 
of food is essential. Too much 
food uses an overabundance of the 
blood and strength to digest it. Then 
again too little food needs to be con- 
sidered also. An underfed child cannot 
grow physically as it should because 
there is not enough nourishment pres- 
ent to promote growth. 

Exercise of the proper kind is an 
essential of this phase. Man must 



have pliysical training for the culture 
of his actions and mo\-ements. Man 
must first be a good animal. Many of 
the lower animals are given special 
physical training and it is a fact not to 
he disputed that man is also subject to 
the same organic laws as the lower 
creatures. In our modern age, the 
physical phase is neglected in our 
schools and the mind is respected. This 
endangers our age with enfeebled 
health, with all its pains, disabilities, 
and glo'om. Our nation will decrease 
in physical strength and vigor which 
will in time hinder the intellectual 
phase. Sound bodies are necessary. 
Physical beauty will be absent. The 
all-wise Creator intended that the 
young should be strong for he says, 
"the young glory in their strength and 
the old in their gray hair." 

To attain the intellectual ideal im- 
jjlies ideal teachers and ideal condi- 
tions. The teacher does not learn the 
lesson but he guides, directs, and spurs 
the pupil onward. He is a living soul 
of broad culture. Through his broad 
training, he knows and understands 
the child nature. He can direct the 
course of study so as to give the pupil 
breadth for power and depth for eflfi- 
ciency. The curiosity of the pupil is 
aroused and the interest is held. The 
acquiring of knowledge is made pleas- 
urable instead of painful. When the ac- 
<]uiring of knowledge is rendered ha- 
bitually gratifying, then there will be 
a prevailing tendency to continue with- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



out siipenntendence. The mind is 
trained; it is accustomed to work; it 
is aware of its power ; and knows its 
s])ecial adaption. Curiosity when prop- 
erly directed, must necessarily lead 
the individual to stri\-e for the cogni- 
tive ideal. 

The social phase is developed thru 
sociability which leads to the social 
ideal. Man is still in the gregarious 
stage and loves companionship. This 
phase implies a good-will feeling to- 
ward , humanity. If this phase were 
neglected, happiness, peace and dignity 
would be absent and wretchedness and 
villainy, present. 

This social feeling has an elevating 
force and the most potent factor for 
developing this feeling in the school is 
the teacher by his personal example. 
His character and discipline must win 
the respect of his pupils. He must 
show due respect where it is required. 
When pupils speak sneeringly of one 
another, he must check it and culti- 
vate sympathy, respect, reverence> 
kindness, and love. Sympathy will aid 
study, and moral training increase so- 
cial pleasures. 

The moral ideal is reached through 
example rather than through precept. 
Imitation leads one to the ethical ideal. 
The college student is rarely strength- 
ened in his faith in moral theories by 
his theoretic study. Mora! education 
is a wider term than teaching morals. 
Teaching morals implies a set of ex- 
pository lessons or speeches while 
moral education works principally 
through example. This example may 
be the parent, the teacher, or an as- 
sociate or all combined. The example 
is concrete ; the set lesson often is ab- 
stract and is therefore the less influ- 



ential. At once it may be concluded 
that the teacher or example must be 
a living reality in order to subject the 
lower feelings to the higher, to im- 
prove the moral judgment, to observe 
the moral law, and to strengthen the 
feeling of moral obligation. 

The teacher as a disciplinarian must 
be careful in the formation and en- 
forcement of rules. Punishment and 
rewards must be given with great dis- 
cretion. The teacher must be an ex- 
ample to the fullest extent in the em- 
bodiment of his rules and precepts. 

The object here is to develop the 
higher feelings, to check some of the 
lower, and to refine others. The moral 
feelings must be made sensitive so that 
they will respond to a stimulus. This 
can be done by example in showing the 
feelings rather than talking about 
them. Wrong doing must pain the 
teacher and the child must be aware of 
it. 

To form the moral judgment re- 
quires an understanding and obser- 
vance of the feelings of others. It is 
not enough to see the actions of a mor- 
al man, but why he is so. The mo- 
tives and intentions as well as the ac- 
tions must be understood. The Bible, 
history, and fiction afiford varied ex- 
amples to carry the child's mind into a 
wider field. Such instruction is said 
to be education in the true moral sense. 
Formal lessons are necessary to aid 
morality but they simply aid. Expo- 
sition is necessary to correct some of 
the existing customs. These lessons 
aid the building up of the conscience. 
Noble characters bring before the 
pupil a feeling of sensibility which ap- 
peals to him. Literature is a medium 
through which the inner life finds ex- 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



pression. It awakens that voice with- 
in us that otherwise would have re- 
mained dormant. 

In a Christian country it may be in- 
ferred that the people have had a 
training in religion. One must know 
something of religion before becoming 
a Christian. The state educates for 
this life;the church forthe lifeto come. 
To educate for the life to come embod- 
ies a preparation for the better things 
of the life that now is. If the meager 
time set apart for the religious educa- 
tion be compared with that of the state, 
it is astonishing that the results are 
not less meager than they really are. 

True education really begins with 
Christ and ends with Christ. If our 
modern education does not have this 
view, the lack of perfection is clearly 
exemplified. 

Should there not be as well-trained 
teachers in the Sunday School as there 
are in the state? What has the church 
done to prepare teachers for the Sun- 
day School ; and what should the 
church do? Then the question might 
be asked, what should the teacher do 



to prepare himself for his work? Means 
must be developed for making the Sun- 
day School worth while for men and 
women. Teachers, who guide the 
pupils in right lines and efiforts, must 
be received. These teachers must 
build in the souls of their pupils a 
wholesome and abiding love for the en- 
tire Bible. Dr. Nott once said, "Men 
cannot be well educated without the 
Bible. It ought therefore, to hold the 
chief place in every institution of 
learning throughout Christendom." 
Scott called for the Bible on his death- 
bed, saying. "There is only one book." 
Let us stick to the Bible for it is our 
all. If we lose it, we will be lost and 
are really already lost. In the Bible 
these words are found. "Remember 
thy creator in the days of thy youth." 
This throws the responsibility upon 
the home and the church. The lesson 
must first be taught. The message 
must be carried to every creature. 
Then and then only may the hope to 
strive toward the religious ideal in 
education, be present. 



The Psychology of Esthetics 



B. F. Walts. 

SUBJECTIVELY, Esthetics 
has been defined as the science 
of the feelings which are con- 
cerned in the production and apprecia- 
tion 01 beau'Jul things. I^jr its sub- 
ject matter it has both the beauty of 
art and of Nature. The chief purpose 
of Esthetics, it has l)een .said, is to 
help us clarify and to become con- 
scious of our own tastes. We shall 



•14 



treat of Esthetics only as it bears along 
the culture side. We shall speak of it 
in its relation to the school. 

The esthetic sense arises as a whole 
I'ror.i the rcco_c;:.i;ion of tlie Iiarrr.onious 
blending of a number of simple rela- 
tions. When it manifests itself in per- 
sonal bearing, in courtesy, in character 
in (lei)th and breadth of learning, in the 
ability and willingness to use learn- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



ii.y tor self enjoyment and for the hap- 
•piness of others, we have Esthetic 
Culture. 

'!"he senses of sight and hearing con- 
tribute most to the esthetic feehngs. 
'["he others are more or less involved, 
because of their close relation to self, 
'i'he esthetic sentiment stands out in 
strong contrast with the lower pleas- 
ures of sense and appetite because of 
its refirieiiient and purity. It thus 
ranks above all that is low. base, 
coarse, or vulgar. It is based upon the 
perfection of other feelings and begets 
a love of perfection for its own sake. 

The esthetic emotions serve for en- 
joyment and refinement, but not di- 
rectly for utility and action. These 
emotions are not awakened when any- 
thing painful or disagreeable accom- 
panies the objects capable of producing 
them. As in the case of a beautiful 
sunset, or a fine painting, or a flash of 
wit, enjoyment is a common privilege. 

The esthetic feeling is a relative feel- 
ing. It varies in persons and commun- 
ities. Each community nevertheless 
has an established standard of taste 
which is based on experience, observa- 
tion, and intellect. Dexter and Gar- 
lick say, "We express an esthetic judg- 
ment when we say an object is beau- 
tiful or ugly and this Judgment we call 
Taste." Thus it follows that the value 
of our judgment depends upon the 
cultivation of this faculty. The cause 
of our varying judgments is that they 
are very seldom purely esthetic. Many 
other elements, such as cost and v'alue, 
enter in very frequently. When the 
uncultured man sees a tree, he sses in 
it only its utility, w-hile one who is 
cultured sees the beauty, symmetry, 
and proportion firstly, and second, sees 



its utility. 

There arises a feeling of pleasure 
when the organs of sight and hearing 
are perfectly stimulated. You are con- 
scious of peculiar feelings of satisfac- 
tion and joy in the presence of beauty 
of form, beauty of color, beauty of 
sound, beauty of emotion, and beauty 
of character. Children are not able 
to distinguish between the pleasant 
and the beautiful usually. Experience 
is necessary in order to distinguish 
between the pleasurable and the 
I)eautiful. The sensuous element is 
manifest in the love of activity, that 
which tends to have us imitate na- 
ture. Because of recognizing this 
fact, the Kindergarten as well as the 
clay modelling of our schools are based 
upon it. Some of the physiological 
methods of expressing this feeling are 
given by Dexter and Garlick, "When 
viewing the sublime we are conscious 
of the raised head, the stretched na- 
ture, the expanded lungs; the fixed 
look is associated with the pretty ; the 
pleased or admiring look with the 
graceful." 

There is an intellectual element also 
present in the esthetic sentiment and 
signifies a higher form of its nature. 
By means of color, form, and sound 
the perceptive faculty is called into 
play. By arranging the color in certain 
ways a pleasure is derived which the 
child seems to enjoy at a very early 
age. This is also used in the Kinder- 
garten to a great advantage. The 
child also appreciates time, in the 
forms of rhythm, meter, and melody. 
By means of the mental operations of 
observing he recognizes the agreeable 
relations between different things that 
are about him As his powers of dis- 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



crimination are developing he uses 
these to a great advantage in seeing 
the beauty in those things that are 
beautiful, and the ugly in those things 
that do not appeal to his senses. 

A further stage in the development 
of the esthetic feeling is that of ideal- 
ity. It is also an intellectual element 
but deserves special mention because 



of the important part it plays. The 
Grand Canon in the Rockies, the Yel- 
lowstone National Park ai.d many 
places of historic interest do noL appeal 
to children because they lack the in- 
terest of association. The chiid docs 
not possess knowledge and ext):iiencc 
which are necessities to idea! pleas- 
ures. 




For "^e 




Pan On Wall Street 



Minerva 

MAN was the Greek God of the 
woods and dales. He repre- 
sented to the Greeks the simple 
rustic joys of a nature loving people. 
He was followed by many devotees 
who danced and frolicked to the merry 
strains of his pipe. These children of 
the woods felt after the irregular, var- 
ious harmonies of nature, the anthem 
of the winds, the roll of the surges, and 
the laughter of the ocean waves. Their 
natures were keenly sensitive to the 
beauty of sky, sea and cloud. Far re- 
moved from them was the sordid love 
of money ; very close to them was the 
breath of the violet and clover. 

"Great Pan is dead !" was the mourn- 
ful cry of Edmund Clarence Stedman, 



Heisey. 10 

our Broker poet. The expression was 
called forth by the following incident: 
An old minstrel had strolled into 
the city of New York. He was rag- 
ged and poor. As he passed along 
the street he piped to the civic ear the 
prelude of some pastoral song. A 
spell was thrown over those listening, 
"And swift, on Music's misty ways, 
It led, from all this strife, millions 
To ancient, sweet-do-nothing days 
Among the kirth-robed Sicilians." 

The music drew together the busi- 
ness people of the street, the news- 
boys, and passersby. A policeman 
stridirig along in his uniform scoffed 
at the old minstrel and sent him away, 
saying angrily, "We have not time for 



OUR COLLEGE TLMES 



13 



}uu ulil man; Great Pan, whose music 
vou sing, is dead." 

If Pan, with his love for rustic 
haunts, his merry, social ways, his ap- 
preciation for all that is airy and beau- 
tiful is no longer with us, we* hope 
that in the rush and roar of present 
day traffic, there are those who cherish 
all of old Pan's splendid qualities. 

Wall Street represents the business 
world of to-day, the old minstrel the 
longing of the hungr}- soul for the 
higher, nobler things in life. — the 
things which satisfy. The old minstrel 
could have remained, but people had 
not time for him, he was driven out 
by an unsympathetic listener. The 
brokers were refreshed by the tender 
strains of his music and. who knows, 
hut they returned to their employment 
with something new in their hearts. 

George W. Curtis in "Prue and F' 
gives a series of sketches or medita- 
tions showing the enjoyment to be de- 
rived from even the most common 
place existence. These papers are sup- 
posed to be written by an old book- 
keeper, who strolls down the street at 
dinner time and, without envy, watches 
the diners out. In fancy, he goes 
along, dines with them, and with them 
enjoys their pleasures. He owns many 
castles in Spain. "These are not real 
castles: they are creations of his imag- 
ination and he realizes more joy in 
visiting and living in them than many 
prosaic persons experience by living 
in real palaces. He is happy because 
he roams at will in the broad world of 
fancy. The spires and pinnacles of 
the sunset sky belong to every man, 
and in the Fair realm of Fantasie all 
may wander at will." 

This bookkeeper's subordinate tells 



the story of the strange spectacles 
which show a man in his true light. 
( )nce the owner was in love and look- 
ing through his spectacles he saw not 
the lady, but himself. How many to- 
day in their work see only themselves 
and the money for which they are 
striving; and fail to see the beautiful 
sunsets overhead and the flowers about 
their feet, and fail to hear the music 
by which they are surrounded? Why 
riOt try to be followers of Pan at least 
part of the time? We need to develop 
our aesthetic faculties as well as the 
bank-account. Xothing but business 
jiiakes us stingy and very small in- 
deed. In order to develop the mind 
we must expand, take an interest in 
art, literature, and music. All these 
we can find around us every day, in 
the landscape, in the sky, and in our 
fellow men. 

Nature speaks to us of the grandeur 
and majesty of the L'niverse and of the 
wisdom of God. 
"To him who in the love of Nature 

holds 
Communion with her visible forms, she 

speaks 
A various language." 

The influence of literature upon man 
is remarkable. "You may judge a man 
more truly by his library than by his 
companions. A reading people will 
soon become a thinking people and a 
thinking people must soon become a 
great people." Good literature lifts 
the readers to its own level. In it we 
meet great men on an equal footing, 
we come to know them better and 
feel at ease with them. It is litera- 
ture that causes the man in business 
to lose his narrow self in the broader 
life that is opened to him. Literature 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



is rich, not only in thought but in 
character. He cannot find better so- 
ciety in the world than that found in 
good books. 

The every day hie contains a certain 
monotony, and unless helped by higher 
ideals, as found in this broader life of 
culture, even the strongest may be- 
come weary and weak. "Literary cul- 
ture is mental horticulture ; it joins 
beauty to utility and gives fertility, 
harmony and completeness to the mind 
of its possessor."' 

\\ ho does not know the power of 
music? Truly music has power to 
elevate, refine and spiritualize. Those _ 
engaged in business will find it health- 
ful, the most pleasant of all medicines. 
Music is to the ear and intellect what 
strawberries and peaches are to the 
taste. It arouses and intensifies the 
emotions, and so gives us development 
in this direction. Let us give a share 
of our time to music and find that it 
builds character, makes toil lighter, 
rests the mind, is a cure for the in- 
fectious and ridiculous business fever 
which is the cause of many prema- 
ture collapses, Luther says, "Those 
•who are not touched by music I hold 
to be stocks and stones." A few sweet 



i.otes will bring hours of pleasure to 
the wear\- and world-for-saken. 
"() heart of Xature beating still 

With throbs her vernal passion 
taught her, — 
Even here, as on the vine-clad hill. 

Or by the Arethusan water ! 
Xew forms may fold the speech, 

Xew lands arise within these ocean- 
[)orta!s. 
But music waves eternal wands. 

Enchantress of tlie souls of mor- 
tals I" 

Let us then develop our aesthetic 
faculties along with the practical. Let 
us give vent to our emotions and 
strengthen our imaginations. Let us 
listen to stars and buds, babes and 
sages with open heart. Let us allow 
the spiritual, unbidden and unconscious 
to grow up through the common. 
"Hours there will be when Fame 
whispers, "Joy is not in me." Ambition 
worn with its fierce fever, whispers. 
■Joy is not in me." Success confesses, 
'J(iy is ncit in me." "" In such hours, liap- 
])y will be the youth who has learned 
in solitude to go apart, and find that 
happiness which the world can neither 
give nor take away. 



The School and the Life of Today 



Address by Snpt. Sani«l Fleisher on Opening Say, Sept. 4 



THE age in which we live is 
marvelous in many ways. In 
research and investigation 
wonderful progress has been made. 
Step by step the elements are yield- 
ing to the control of man. and many 
of the diseases have been compelled 
to give way to the remedial agencies 



and ])reventives discovered by the 
scientific investigator. 

In the industrial arts the inventions 
are so many and so well adapted to 
their use, that miracles are being 
wrought before our eyes. 

With reference to civic life public 
sentiment is such that men in public 



OUR COLLEGE TLMES 



15 



life must be true to their trust, or the 
coiKlemnation of all well-thinking men 
is visited upon those who fail to Hve 
the lives of honest and capable pub- 
lic servants. 

In national Hfe a higiier typ^ of 
manhood is demanded, and in interna- 
tional relations the fact that mankind 
should be bound together in bonds of 
peace is taking deep roots in the hearts 
of men. 

The school of today has a special 
duty laid upon it to educate men and 
women, not for living in the past with 
the conditions of the past, but for liv- 
ing the life of to-day. 

This age demands men and women 
who realize their responsibilities as 
members of society in relation to the 
industrial life, in relation to the 
intellectual life, in relation to civic life, 
in relation to moral and religious life. 

For a high degree of efficiency in the 
industrial life the preparation of to- 
day must be superior. In every de- 
partment of commercial life complex 
and intricate problems are presented 
so that a successful pursuit of that 
life can be carried on only by the man 
who has learned to bring careful 
thought and intelligence to bear upon 
the various problems presented. 

The civic life of every community 
demands a higher order of intelligence 
and wise judgment, so that public af- 
fairs may be wisely administered. In 
every district and municipality, from 
the township to the city, there is waste 
and misdirected c^ort. because men 
are not capable of grasping the situ- 
ations placed before them. 

So varied and complex are the duties 
of those who have control of the affairs 
of even the smallest community that 



unless a trained mind can be brought 
to bear upon the practical problems 
met on every side, mistakes, numerous 
and costly, are sure to be n:ade. Even 
in such an ordinarj- piece cf w i -k .is 
road and street construction and re- 
])air it is not difficult to find cases in 
which there was lack of judgment. 
'I'he school of to-day must train men 
and women to think, so that no mat- 
ter what the problems are a high de- 
igree of intelligent thought will be 
exercised in the solution of those 
problems. 

Moral and Religious Life 

While I do not believe that the 
world is growing worse and that there 
is a tendenc}' toward vice and immor- 
alitj- greater than in the past history 
of our country, yet surely there is a 
demand for men of clean, pure thought 
who will stand for civic and indivi- 
dual righteousness, ^^'hile the world 
does need men and women of intellec- 
tual strength and vigor, men and 
women specially trained to fill special 
])ositions demanding special talent and 
special preparation, the world to-day 
has great need of high-toned Christian 
men and women. 

The moral and religious training im- 
parted by institutions such as this will 
ever prove to be a rich blessing to 
our people. The valuable service ren- 
dered by those mstitutions that give 
religious instruction, such as is im- 
parted here, should be appreciated by 
all who realize the fact that the per- 
manency of the life of our nation 
rests and depends upon the char- 
acter of the individual. If the 
individual is morally weak and 
and godless, our national life 
rests upon a very insecure foundation. 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TLAIES 



Young men and women, I trust that 
?.t this opening of a new year of your 
school hfe you are ready to enter upon 
your work with a realization of the fact 
that in this insti:inion you have placed 
before you piivileges anc' opportunities 
that should cause your hearts to fill 
\»ith g-atitude. This institution stands 
as a memorial of the loveofyourfriends 
and it represents the sacrifices they 
were willing to make in order that 
your life, might be richer and better. 
I have confidence in you, and I believe 
that you will not disappoint those 
whose devotion made this school pos- 
sible. 

Your success here will depend not so 
much upon the skill, intelligence, and 
devotion of your teachers as upon your 
individual effort. Neither will effort 
alone enable you to get the most out 
of your school course. Your effort 
must be wise and earnest. In a naval 
engagement tons upon tons of ammu- 
nition may be used, but the shot that 
hits is the only one that counts. 

Those of you who have worked on 
the farm have often noticed with how 
much more ease one man does his 
work than another. Often the physic- 
ally strong man finds work more diffi- 
cult than a relatively weak man. The 
difference lies in the fact that the one 
man depends entirely upon his animal 
strength, the other uses his intellect in 
conjunction with physical force. 

In all your effort learn to concentrate 
your faculties so that your work will 
be effective. It is a trite expression 
to say, "there is no royal road to learn- 
ing." The man who is always look- 
ing around for something easy, can 
never find that one easy thing. The 



only happy man or woman is the work- 
ing man or woman. 

The world is full uf men and women 
who seemingly do not enjoy their 
work. The half a million tramps in 
this land is evidence that some men 
are willing to shirk all work. If you 
do not enjoy your work, there is either 
something morally wrong with you, 
or you are unfitted for the work that 
yon are trying to do. Realize, how- 
ever, that enjoyment in a particular 
kind of work may come, and often 
does come, as soon as the proper 
amount of effort is directed toward 
that work. The most uninteresting 
studv may in time become most fas- 
cinating. 

Let me impress one thought upon 
vou that will be of immense value to 
you, if you grasp it. "Your power to 
do depends largely upon your faith 
in yourself." How often do we find 
students who paralyze their efforts by 
thinking, "I can not do this or, I can 
not do that." Our kind Creator made 
man in his own image. He did not in- 
tend us to be mean, groveling creat- 
ures. He bids us stand on our feet, 
and to realize that there is a divine 
nature within us. We are urged to 
come to Him for both wisdom and 
strength, and we are assured that all 
needed good things will freely be giv- 
en us. 

Let me urge upon you to take as 
your motto. "He can who thinks he 
can." Forever banish from your vo- 
cabulary the miserable "I can't." In- 
stead of the weak, confidence-lacking 
"I will try" substitute "I will" and 
you will be astounded at what you 
can do. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




'^HI-^HH 



OL'R College Times enters up- 
on its eighth year with a num- 
ber of marked improvements. 
It has enlarged its dimensions both in 
length, breadth, and thickness. Each 
copy will contain thirty-two pages. 
Don't you think our cover and cuts 
for heads of departments are beautiful 
and suggestive? The cover and 
heads for Contents, Alumni, and Edi- 
torial departments have been de- 
signed by our Art Editor, Miss Daisy 
Rider, '10, of Elizabethtown, who is 
at present a student at the School of 
Design, in Philadelphia. Other per- 
sons who deserve special mention are 
Mr. I. E. Shoop, '04, who designed the 
heading for School Notes, and Mr. Al- 
bert Reber who designed the heading 
ior Exchanges. 

The Business Management have 
"been very successful in securing "ads" 
ior this year's issues of our College 
Times. They have pressed the mat- 
ter in an earnest manner and we ap- 
preciate greatly the host of business 
friends who have, through advertising 
in our columns, helped us to make our 
paper what it is today. These friends 
will in turn be gratified to know that 
our business manager has contracted 
for a thousand copies of our paper to 
be issued monthly. 



Duties of Editorial Staff. 

L To secure as many new subscri- 
bers as possible. Don't forget when 
your friends visit the College, or when 
you visit them, or write to them to 
ask them whether they are subscribers 
to "Our College Times." 

2. You should be on the lookout 
for news, marriages, deaths, appoint- 
ments of students to lucrative, or 
otherwise honorable or responsible 
positions. 

3. All articles for the November is- 
sue should be in the Editor's hands 
on or before the 14th of October, and 
likewise on each following month. 

4. Do your best and thus add to the 
success of "Our College Times," and 
of our College in general. 

5. All members of the Editorial 
Staff and every student in College 
should be interested in the College 
paper. Many of you have done nobly, 
and we feel grateful for your help. 

All members of the Editorial Staff 
whose duty it is to write up articles 
in their line and any other friends 
who may wish to contribute news for 
our paper will please hand in, or send 
by mail, to the Editor-in-chief all ar- 
ticles before the 14th of each month. 
For instance, all news for the Novem- 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ber number should be in by the 14th 
of October and so on each month 
throughout the year until July. 

Rooms may be registered for at any 
time. A postcard addressed to Dr. D. 
C. Reber, of Elizabethtown, Pa., will 
secure you a pleasant room for the 
Fall or Winter Term. 

Mr. B. F. Waltz is our librarian this 
year. He can be seen sitting in the 
Librarian's chair from three to five P. 
M. poring over his books, yet always 
ready to serve in a courteous manner, 
all who may desire to take out books 
or to get information as to magazines 
and reference books. We shall be 
pleased to publish monthly any news 
concerning the library that Mr. .Waltz 
may have to contribute. 

James Quinter Reber is the name of 
the little boy who, on July 16, came 
to grace the home of Dr. and Mrs. D. 
C. Reber. We notice occasioanlly on 
passing their home, that his voice is 
developing harmoniously with the 
other powers of his body. 

A postcard received by Miss Mazie 
Martin states that Miss Markley leaves 



her home in Zanesville. Ohio, on Sep- 
tember 18, to take up her work in the 
Agnes Scott College for Women lo- 
cated at Decatur, Georgia. 

Miss Rebekah Sheaffer is not only 
■ very much interested in teaching her 
school at Stu-mptown in L'pper Lea- 
cock Township, but she also enjoys 
greatly the rides on horseback to and 
from her school. "Star" behaves well, 
and no doubt is pleased with his new 
bridle and saddle. 

. A letter from Mr. and Mrs. G. H. 
Light, Hatfield, Pa., contains the fol- 
lowing: "A little girl, Emma Grace, 
came into our home on Monday, Sept. 
11. We want her name on the College 
Cradle Roll. 

Card of Thanks 

THE Management hereby ex- 
press their sincerest thanks to 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. GrofT 
for the beautiful upholstered corner- 
chair recently donated to the Music 
Studio, which is also used as the Col- 
lege Reception Room. 

\\'e hear whisperings of another 
donation which mav come in later. 




THE new students have become next few weeks, 
accustomed to the ways of the We are starting the year's work un- 
school and are doing well, der favorable conditions. Improve- 
There will be more coming during the ments are being made along many lines. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



The halls, dining room, and a few class 
rooms have been papered, and in a few 
-days we can include Society Hall in 
thi's list. 

Literary work will be emphasized 
this year more than ever. 

The science department has just 
been furnished with an extensive sup- 
ply of physical apparatus. 

The school campus and grounds are 
being kept in excellent order. Much 
interest is shown in tennis, baseball 
and other out door recreation. 



Mr. Diehm Wins Prize 

WE take great pleasure in an- 
nouncing to our friends that 
on last July 4th, Mr. Edgar 
Diehm. a graduate from our school in 
the Commercial Course, who is now 
pursuing the College Preparatory 
Course here, entered an oratorical 
contest held at Lititz, and came out as 
winner of the first prize. 

The following clipping from the 
Lititz Express gives some particulars 
concerning the contest : — 

The orators in the order in which 
they delivered their orations were as 
follows: Warren Hall. Coatesville ; 
Edgar Diehm, Elizabethtown ; Samuel 
Freymyer, Reinholds ; Charles Herr, 
Millersville ; Leroy G. Mumma, Quar- 
Tyville ; and Francis Hagon,. Lititz. 

After the orations were delivered 
the judges, who were Rev. E. W. Gay- 
lord, of Brickerville ; Rev. C. E. Herm- 
stedt, of New York City, and Prof. 
Geo. Land, of F. & M. Academy, Lan- 
caster, retired for a few minutes when 
they returned and Rev. Gaylord an- 
nounced the winning contestants as 
Edgar Diehm, first prize of $10, and 



^Francis Hagon, second prize of $5. 
Much applause followed and it was 
evident that the awards of the judges 
met with the approval of the audience. 
The orations were the patriotic works 
by well known American statesmen 
and Mr. Diehm chose Patrick Henry's 
"Liberty or Death," while Mr. Hagon 
used one entitled "Dreadnaughts, or 
dread everything." 

Since last Commencement President 
D. C. Reber has spent eight Sundays 
in delivering temperance discourses 
under the auspices of the Anti-Saloon 
League of Pennsylvania. He has 
spoken in churches of the United 
Brethren, United Evangelical and the 
Church of the Brethren, in Cumber- 
land. Franklin, Dauphin, Lebanon, and 
Lancaster counties. He finds a heal- 
thy sentiment for temperance, espe- 
cially among members of the Church 
of the Brethren. He has been greeted 
by large audiences that have given lib- 
era! financial support. The Anti-Sa- 
loon League officials report that next 
to the Old Presbyterian Church, the 
Church of the Brethren is the most 
liberal contributors to the temperance 
cause in this state. 

Prof. Ober has also spoken for the 
League five different Sundays, and 
has been compelled to refuse a num- 
ber of other dates because of his du- 
ties as Sunday School Secretary in the 
Eastern District of Pennsylvania. He 
has arranged to remain in the district 
as much as possfble as he feels that 
the Sunday Schools claim his time. 
He reports a very favorable attitude 
and healthy sentiment among the 
Brethren Church in favor of the great 
temperance movement. He has prom- 
ised every date for Sunday Schools 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



and Children's Meetings until the mid- 
dle of Xovember, and may arrange to 
speak for the temperance cause on sev- 
eral of these Sundays. 
Alumni Notes 

Another name for our Cradle Roll 
is Mary Elizabeth Livengood, second 
daughter of Charles, '06, and Gertrude 
Hertzler Livengood, who first saw the 
light of day in August 1911. 
Editorial 

We extend congratulations to Dr. I. 
Harvey Brumbaugh, who has recently 
been (elected) (appointed) president 
of Juniata College to succeed Dr. M. 
G. Brumbaugh, of Philadelphia. 



College Lecture Course for 1911-12 

The Library Committee is at work 
arranging an interesting course of lec- 
tures and entertainments for the stu- 
dents and friends of Elizabethtown 
College. At this time the complete 
arrangements for the course are not 
ready but a preliminary announcement 
will inform our friends of the first 
number, and the complete course will 
be announced in the next issue of Our 
College Times. 

Dr. Frederick J. Stanley, of New- 
burg, New York, will give two lec- 
tures of the course. The first number 
of the course occurs October 19 at 
which time Dr. Stanley will deliver 
a lecture entitled "Young Men and 
Women of Japan," in the College 
Chapel. His second lecture which will 
be the fourth number of the course, 
will be given April 18, 1912. His sub- 
ject will be the "Supremacy of the Pa- 
cific." Dr. Stanley will be remembered 
as having been on last year's course 
and as having lectured on "The Orien- 



tal Crisis of Today." Dr. Stanley is a 
student of history and is thoroughly 
prepared to handle his subject with 
skill and satisfaction. 

It is expected that the Music Depart- 
ment of Elizabethtown College will 
again give one number of the course. 
There are two lectures yet to be' pro- 
vided for. The price for season tickets 
will be $1.50. Let every student and 
friend of the school be. ready to pur- 
chase a season ticket when the solicitor 
calls in a few weeks. 



Society News 

The Keystone Literary Society held 
its first meeting of the present school 
year, on Friday evening, Sept. 8. It 
was well attended and the interest was 
exceptionally good. Spe9ial features 
of the meeting were : the fine vocal 
solos by Miss Katie Aliller, our Vocal 
Music Director, a splendid oration by 
Mr. Ed. Diehm. and the debate. The 
question for debate was, — Resolved, 
That the note book habit in High 
Schools and Preparatory Schools 
should be abolished. 

We are glad to note, that the value 
of a training, such as the Society af- 
fords in its various phases, is being 
appreciated, from the fact, that the 
new students are becoming active 
members. 

The work done by the Society in 
the past has been of a high order and 
present indications are that we may 
expect some great things in the future. 

The newly elected officers are, — 
Pres., Levi K. Ziegler, of Ridgely. Md. ; 
Pres., Levi K. Ziegler. of Ridgely, Md. 
V. Pres., Walter F. Eshelman. Eliza- 
bethtown ; Sec, Gertrude Miller. Eph- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



rata: Editor, Edgar Deihin, Lititz; 
Critic, Prof. Walter K. Gish, Rheems; 
Treas.. 



MRS. Augusta Reber's assistants 
in the culinary department this 
year are, — Miss Bertha M. 
Hollinger, of Annville, daughter of 
Rev. Henry Hollinger, and Mrs. Kath- 
ryn Sonon. widow of the late Mil- 
ton Sonon, whose home is near Pet- 
ersburg, Pa. Mrs. Sonon's only 
child rooms and boards with her, 
and attends school in the borough of 
Elizabethtown. 

Lawn tennis has already become an 
interesting means of recreation for our 
students. 

The first game of baseball was 
played Tuesday, Sept. 18th. 

Mr. W. K. Gish teaches the gentle- 
men Physical Culture this year. Our 
young men's classes may be seen at 
intervals running out to the school- 
house and coming back by way of 
Graybill's farm. 

Miss Lydia Staufifer is teaching the 
ladies' classes in Physical Culture. We 
are pleased with the interest mani- 
fested in this line of work. 



DEPARTMENT WORK 
Commercial Department 

AT the beginning of the new- 
school year we find the Short- 
hand, and Typewriting depart- 
ment of our school active and busy. 
New students have come in, and have 
started their work with an earnestness 
and zeal hard to be surpassed, each 
striving to do his best. Not much 
time is lost, for the student learns 



ujTon entering that in order to finish 
the rc(iuirt;(l work in the time allotted 
nothin,^ but hard, earnest work will 
suffice. 

We invite our readers, at the be- 
ginning of this new school year, to 
call upon us sometime during the year 
and investigate the inner workings of 
this department. We feel that we have 
opportunities and advantages to olifer 
that will compare favorably and which 
are in many respects superior to the 
high grade business schools of our 
large cities and towns. We claim, and 
are ready to prove our claim, that our 
methods of teaching and practice of 
Shorthand, as well as Typewriting, 
are as modern and up to date as any 
that can be offered. 

We teach the noted Gregg System 
of Shorthand, which is becoming more 
popular every day, having won the 
championship in many of our recent 
speed contests, thus proving itself to 
be a system, not only of speed in writ- 
ing, but also of accuracy and legibility. 
There is, perhaps, more value in the 
ability to write Shorthand than one 
may at first thought, imagine. It is 
not only valuable for office practice, 
where it is perhaps most extensively 
used, but its value in note taking, 
forming books of reference, and in re- 
porting of sermons, lectures, speeches, 
etc., is often not correctly estimated. 

Special stress is laid upon accuracy 
and thoroughness of Shorthand work 
from the very beginning of the fun- 
damental principles, as set forth in the 
manual, to the end of the course, when 
the student is able to read his notes 
fluently and accurately. Xo less stress 
however, is laid upon the typewritten 
work than upon the Shorthand, for 



22 



OUK COLLEGE TIMES 



one is equal to the other in import- 
ance. With our addition of five new 
Underwood Typerwriters we are 
equipped to do neat and systematic 
work. We use the Touch System of 
Typewriting (writing by touch, not by 
sight), and as a text book and guide 
the Rational Typewriting book, pub- 
lished by the Gregg Publishing Co., 
is used in which are set forth and ex- 
plained the latest forms of business 
letters, legal documents, etc., etc., all 
of which are written and rewritten 
many times, thus giving the student 
the much needed practice along these 
various lines, and better fitting for 
his work. 

May many more enroll in this de- 
partment during the year; and, again, 
we extend to all a cordial invitation 
to visit this department and see what 
v/cjrk we are doing. A. W. W. 



Bible and Religious Work 
Through the tender care of the 
Father the Bible Department shows 
encouraging growth over that of last 
year. The enrollment has trebled that 
of last Fall Term. We now have reg- 
ular class work in Bible Geography, 
Mark, Psalms, and Holy Spirit. 

General interest is shown in religious 
development. Arrangements are being 
made to begin a class on Sunday 
morning in the study of Christ's teach- 
ing on Prayer. The mid-week prayer 
meeting indicates a growth in inter- 
est and spirituality. 

The first Missionary Reading Cir- 
cle meeting of the year was one that 
W'ill long be remembered. About for- 
ty came in promptly at the opening of 
the meeting. After a most spiritual 



opening, the officers for the term were 
elected as follows: President, B. F. 
Waltz; Vice pres., Levi Zeigler; Sec, 
Mamie Keller; Treas., Prof. Harley; 
Teacher, Lydia Stauft'er. The class 
then decided to read "The Unfinished 
Task." The meeting was then thrown 
open for voluntary remarks and testi- 
monies. Eight or ten students and 
teachers expressed themselves as hav- 
ing received benefits that can not be 
estimated in meetings of the past. May 
the Lord nourish and prosper the 
spiritual interests in every avenue. 

' L. S. 

Agriculture 

THE College truck patch and 
orchard is certainly making a 
fine appearance. Roasting- 
ears, sweet potatoes, cantaloupes, 
watermelons, cabbage, beans, tomatoes 
and celery are in season now and the 
College dining-room is the place where 
many of these good things make their 
final disappearance. Turnips and late 
sweet corn will come a little later. 

About four acres of the farm has a 
fine crop of field corn, with a small 
patch of broom corn. The orchard is 
looking very fine. The trees have 
made a remarkable growth. About 
one acre of the orchard is in a thriving 
strawberry patch, and if nothing un- 
foreseen happens, there ought to be a 
fine crop of luscious fruit next spring. 
The peach and apple trees have made 
remarkable fine growth, and if weather 
conditions are favorable, there ought 
to be quite a number of the peach trees 
bearing their first fruit by next year. 

Prof. Ober who is managing the 
agricultural side of the campus, has 
planned to add a long row of rhubarb 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



and an asparagus bed to the truck 
patch. Brother S. B. Dennis, who is 
his able assistant, has given the truck 
patch fine attention during the sum- 
mer vacation and we feel sure that, 
by the way matters are moving, this 
truck patch will form a valuable as- 
set to the cooking department of the 
College. 

The students in Agriculture are giv- 
en the opportunity to spray, prune, 
and cultivate the various plants and 
trees, and also give attention to poul- 
try and swine culture. This is a val- 
uable educational feature from which 
we trust much good will come. We 
hope the time will soon be here when 
many of the country boys will feel 
a strong desire to get a good education 
and spend the balance of their time 
on the farm. Surely this is a phase 



of practical life that should receive 
more earnest consideration and atten- 
tion. 

Music Department 

Music, we are glad to say, is no 
more considered a luxury for the few, 
but a necessity for the many. 

A large number have enrolled for 
both Piano and Voice Culture. 

Aside from Piano and Voice, classes 
are organized in Beginning Harmony, 
Theory, Elementary Hist, of Music. 
Solfeggio, Adv. Harmony and begin- 
ning Vocal Class. 

Judging from the interest shown by 
the young aspirants to the Art of Song 
as well as to be master of the piano 
forte, the department bids fair to be a 
most promising and profitable one this 
school year. 




DURING the summer months 
our Alumni have not been idle. 
We have gleaned many inter- 
esting facts concerning their where- 
abouts and ucrivities. 

Miss Luella G. Fogelsanger, '06, a 
former teacher here has recently ac- 
cepted a position in the Holyoke Busi- 
ness Institute, Massachusetts. Her 
present address is 313 Maple St.. Holy- 



oke, Mass. 

Miss Agnes M. Ryan. '09, is teach- 
ing the Mt. Vernon School, Rapho 
township. She has recently received a 
Professional Ccrtif.catc from Dr. 
Fleisher. 

Messrs. Andrew Hollinger. '10, and 
Holmes S. Falkenstein, '10, will attend 
school at Juniata College during the 
coming year. 



OUK COLIiEGE TIMES 



Messrs. F. L. Olweiler, '11, and T. 
M. Ebersole, '11, have enrolled as stu- 
dents at I'ranklin and Alarshall College 
Lancaster, Pa. 

W'c are sorry to report that one of 
our number, H. H. Xye, '06, is serious- 
ly ill with typhoid fever at his home 
in Elizaliethtown. After his recovery 
we hope to have him as a student here 
for the coming year. 

Alaska no longer claims one of our 
graduates, for W. K. Gish, '10, has re- 
turned and has enrolled here as a 
Freshman in the classical course. He 
is also teaching U. S. History and 
Physical Culture. His presence cheers 
us and we welcome him home. 

The stork has recently visited the 
home of S. G. Meyer, '10, where he 
left a baby boy, Ammon Bucher Myer, 
on Aug. 31. He also found the home 
of G. H. Light, '07, and left a baby 
girl, Emma Grace, Sept. 11. We ex- 
tend to both, Mr. Meyer and Mr. Light 
and their wives our heartiest congrat- 
ulations. 

Xo doubt niany have heard of the 
recent success of Mr. E. G. Diehm, 
'10, as an orator. If .you have not 
read the full account of it given on 
another page of this issue. 

We were glad to receive a visit 
from Miss Ella Young, '09, on Sun- 
day evening. Sept. 10. 

Miss Rhoda Markley, '11, has ac- 
cepted a position at Harrisburg. 

Miss Irene Wise, '11, is doing good 
work at the Kreider Shoe Factory in 
Elizabethtown. 

Miss Elma Brandt, '11, has a posi- 
tion in Manheim. 

L'nion Bridge claims one of our 
graduates, Miss Gertrude Hess, '11, 
who is doing some teaching and al- 



so taking further literary work. 

A great manj^ of our graduates have 
returned to take more advanced work. 
Mamie Keller. '11, and Xora Reber, 
'11. are pursuing Pedagogical work; 
Walter F. Eshelman, '10, Joshua Reb- 
er, '09, and E. G. Diehm, '10, College 
Preparatory work ;Gertrude Miller. '09 
English Scientific. Messrs. H. K. 
Eby, '11. J. E. Myers, '11, W. K. Gish 
'10, and L. W. Leiter, '10. are pursu- 
ing College work in the Freshman 
year: and Mr. B. F. Waltz, '10, is pur- 
suing Classical work in the Sophomore 
year. 

Two of the teachers in the College 
Department are our own gradutes and 
are doing excellent work. Prof. J. G. 
Meyer, '05, who received his A. B. de- 
gree at Franklin and Marshall College 
is securing splendid equipment for the 
science department, and Prof. R. W. 
Schlosser, '11, who received his A. B. 
degree here and at Ursinus last year 
is taking charge of the department of 
Latin, French and English. We hear 
whisperings that he is a second Miss 
Markley. 

Married. — Miss Blanche Fisher, '05, 
to Mr. Wm. P. Morgan. 

This should have been reported in 
the July issue but reached us too late. 

Married. — Lizzie M. Eby, '03, to Mr. 
Frank Byer on Aug. 17. at the home 
of the bride in Lancaster. Pa. . The 
couple will live in Chicago, where Mr. 
Byer is teaching at the Bethany Bible 
School. 

Married. — Henry Garman, '04. to 
Miss Hattie Nagle. on June 22. at 
Philadelphia. 

Married. — Jos. O. Cashman, '07, to 
Arminta Fox, at Waynesboro. 

We are sure that all members of the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



Alumni Association extend to these among the Alumni items drop the 

couples best wishes for happiness and Alumni editor a note which will in- 

prosperity in their new life. sure the granting of your desire. 
If you want your name to appear 




wl!t^ai«-.J»n^»«-i-*"ni'-'^''''lJ**«'"-«''**«'«i«lM«^l'"«. W 



AFTER the varied occupations 
of the summer, we again take 
up our quill which has lain 
silent during vacation. We welcome 
all our old exchanges and trust we may 
greatly increase the number through- 
out the year. A good exchange-list 
can not be overestimated. It is the 
medium through which a paper sees 
its merits and defects. A true friend — 
that is what all college magazines 
should be — points out a fault, not for 
the purpose of discouraging an3'body 
but for uplifting the person by show- 
ing him where to improve. Nor is the 
value of the exchange rnerely that of 
criticism. It is also the rneans by 
which the colleges can keep in close 
touch with one another. The import- 
ant events occuring in the schools re- 
ceive recognition in the different pub- 
lications of the institution. 
A college paper should contain news 



of every phase and organization of 
the school. The athletic news dare not 
crowd out the literary productions of 
the students; the school notes and 
jokes must not be substituted for the 
editorial page. The magazine must 
have pages that are of interest to the 
students, alumni, friends of the insti- 
tution, other schools and educators in 
general. 

With these facts in mind it shall be 
our pufpose to criticise candidly from 
time to time which we hope will be 
taken in a friendly spirit. Our ex- 
changes are expected to do likewise, 
and thus we may be of mutual assist- 
ance. We expect to intersperse our 
criticisms with impressive selections 
quoted from the various school papers. 
We will note the improvement over 
the issues of other years and of those 
during the year. So here's for a pros- 
perous and enjoyable year to all. 



OUK COLLEGE TIMES 



The Situation in Maine 

HALF a century ago the state 
of Maine prohibited by law the 
manufacture and sale of intoxi- 
cating liquors within her borders, and 
a quarter of a century ago by a vote 
of 70,000 !or and 23,000 aga'inst she 
inserted a prohibitory clause in her 
constitution. To-day her population, 
judging by the election returns, is 
about ovcnly divided on the question 
of retaining that clause in her con- 
stitution 

This back step must be interpreted 
to mean that in the great struggle 
"twixt right and wrong the former 
has victories in one part of the field 
and reverses in another. The fight 
it long but we must hope on. And 
it's a grand thing to be on the side 
of the right. There's J03' enough in 
ihat Ti!..-,-e is ( )ne who will take care 
of the i.ssue. 

The elTorts which have been made 



through the medium of press, plat- 
form, aui' schoolroom in the cause of 
temperance have not been in vain. 
W'liere would we be had it not been 
lor these ? 

Colonel Bain uses the illustration of 
p leaking ship out at sea. All hands 
wf>rk at the pumps, but the hole keeps 
tilling with water. Some are ready to 
tjive up in despair, but they keep on 
] mulling and the ship reaches the har- 
l)or. That means deliverance. 

It is cheering to think that there are 
many who will not desert the post 
iif duty. Their highest delight is to 
bell) the human race up to better 
things. God is on their side, and all 
will be right in the end. J. S. H. 



Subscription price to "Our College 
Times" is only fifty cents per annum. 
How many subscriptions can you send 



Subscribe for Our College Times. 



50 N. QUEEN ST. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

SIlVe^wV- E of l^he very^best qualhy flTri^s most r^^ 
WATCHES. Our ranee in price is from $1.50 to $1.00. 
CLOCKS. Frrm$300 ch. me clocks to the alarm clock at 85 cents 
EYE-GLASSES and Si EC ' ACLES fitted to the eyes with no charge (or examination 
Our Manufacturing and Repairing Department cannot be excelled in Pennsylvania Everything is 
done in our own shop, by .ur own workmen — You are always welcome at Zook's Jawelrjr StVre. 

D. Walter Miesse 

The College and School Photographer 

rNDIVIDUAL AND CROUP 

PORTRAITS 



Bell Telephone L'iiO.I 

24 WEST KING STREET, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



Mention (Jur College Times When Writins^- 



^ 


GEO 


R. 


KERSEY 


NNA. 


r 
1 


College Jewelry of the Better Sort ■ 


ELI5 


DENTIST 

5ABETHTOWN, - PE 


G.Win.REISNERi 

1 



TOOTH BRUSHES, FLESH BRUSHES, 
SPONGES, Etc. 

A. VV. CAIN 

WE DO IT RIGHT 



Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES ^ SON 
A. R . LEI CHT 

Manufacturer of FmeVehlcleS 

Repainting and Repair Work Given Careful Atttntion 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



i Manufacturing 

I Jeweler 

m Class Pins and Rings Prize Cups 

^ Fraternity Je-welry Medals 

1 LANCASTER, PA. ^ 

nii]i;aiii!iB!ii!HiiiiHiiiiiiiiinii!i:HiiiiH:ii:ai;i:Hini!iia!iiiHuiii£ 

F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 
GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 



HORSESHOEING 
North Market Street. 



SPECIALTY 
ELIZABETH'OWN, PA. 



J. CROFF & SONS 

Meat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



LEO KOB I 

Heating and I 

Plumbing | 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. | 

■■|i.|..|..|.. n .. | .. i .. n .ii.. i i. i .i | i. i .. n .i i ii i i4.4.4.4.4.»»|.4^ 



I Miesse's Ice Cream I 

* is the most Delicious and Satisfying J 

5 thev bave eaten. Try it for yourself, % 

* We serve Parties, Weildings, Dinners $ 
^ and Receptions with cakes and icecream ^ 
•t- with perfect satisfaction. * 
t 0. W. MIESSE, 123 N. Quoen St., Lancaster * 
•{• Our Ice Cream sold in Elizabethtown by J. C. Gross 4' 



FRANK H. KELLER 

Dealer in Fancy and Staple Groceries 
Provisions, Etc. 

Our Higliest Ambition to Please You. 

BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 
PHOTO SUPPLIES FOR SALE 

Centre Square 



UP TO DATE 

Shaving and Hair Cutting 

R. H. SHISSLER. 

Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



Our Advertisers are Wortli_v of Your Patronage, 



I/. E. BELSERl 

<r » 

♦ For tlooliria, Spoiitine, Tin and ,jj 
4f (jiranite Ware, Milk Cans, Radi- ^ 

♦ ators, Portable L""urnaces,Granite * 
^ Lisb Roastprs in four sizes, or ,J 
^. any special orders in my line. p 

♦ Uive me a trial. * 



J ELIZABETH'IOWX. - PENXA. * 



I O. Zimmerman % 

* ?» 

* CHOICE BREAD AND '* 

* CAKES * 






ings and Parties supplied with 
Fancy Cakes at short notice. 



*, S. MARKhT ST.. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA S 



First-Class Shoe Rjepairing 

■Work Guaranteed Prices Reasonable 

RUBBER HEELS make WALKING EASY 
JOHN C. BERBERIAN. E. High St. 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ i>»»»«**»*»«***»**»*** 

\ H. H. BRAND! I 

♦ ♦ 

T Dealer in a 

♦ ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL J 

♦ SLATE and ROOFING PAPER t 

\ \ 

♦ Elizab<tliti)«n, - - I'enna. J 

♦ ♦ 

E. L. RENSEL 

General Blacksniitliin? 

and Repair Work 
H<ii-se-Slioeiiig a Specialty. 

Park St.. Elizabethtown. Pa. 



Plain Suits, Ready-Made or Oidered. at 

ADOLPH G/NSMAN'S 

Clothier 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange St ., lancsster, Fa 
ELIZABETHTOWN 

Dental Parlors 

S. J. HETXDEI., Dentist. 
4Qi9 Touring Car 




Fully Equipped at Above Prices 
Call on or Address 

H. S. NEWCOMER, - Mt. Joy, Pa. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦« ♦♦♦♦< 

ELIZABETHTOWN J 

ROLLER MILLS: 

J. F. BIXKLEV, I'ropr. * 

Manufacturer of Best Grades of ♦ 

FLOUR AND FEED ♦ 

Hi^'-est Cash Prices paid for grain, ^ 

KMZAHETHTOWX. - I'KXXA. ♦ 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦ 

5 AND lOc STORE 

Let us make your .Nickels, Dimes and 
Ciuarters do double duty. Nothing in the store 
is priced more than IDc and from that down. 

M. W. ESHENOWER 
EMZAi'.KTHTtnVX, - PEXXA. 



John A. Fisher 



BARBER 



Centre Square, 



Elizabethtown. Pa. 



Mention Our College Times ^\■he^ Writini; 



Chas. R. Boggs, Restaurant 



First-CIass cTWeals at All Hours 



O/'sters In Season 



Confectionery, Ice Cream 



S. G. HERSHEY 

Groceries, Dry 

Goods and 

Notions 

Et/IZABETHTOWN. - I'ENNA. 



JACOts FISHER 

Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Center Square, Elizabethtown, Penna. 

Wilh vou for 81 years. That's All 



For All Kinds of 
FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & McBride 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PEXXA. 



Hours S to G 



DR. JEROME G. HESS 
DENTIST 



Hertzler Bldg. 
Elizabethtown Pa. 





H. LEHMAN 
COAL 




WOOD, GRAIN, FEED, FLOUR 

SEWER PIPE, ETC. 

Telephone 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Bell and Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

Xew and Old Books 

East Orange St., Lancaster, Pa 



CHOICE MEATS 

A. K. Young 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Ebersole & Baney 

Dealers in 
Choice Groceries, Fine Grade of Teas and 

Coffees. Fresh Conntrj Butter and Eggs 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Penna 



Grover Hefflefinger 



Shoes Renaired Shoes Shiiied 
Hats Cleaned 
Market St. ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



For I'p-to-Date 

Furnishings 

FOR 



I. D. 
BENEMAN'S 

Depl. Store 
MX. JOY, - PA. 




Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



THE ''ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD" 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year Sample Copies Free 

Poorman's Bakery 

Choice Bread, Roils & Cakes 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



HUMMELSTOWN ST. 



H K. OBER 

Notary Public 

Surveyor and Conveyancer! 
Elizabethtown, - - Penna. 




GUY GOCHNAUER'S 
Up-to-Date Shaving Parlor 

South iMarket St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

CENTRAL MEAT MARKET 

AH Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



M. H. GOOD 



ELIZABETHTOWN 



S. B. KIEFER 

Notary Public 

Insurance, Real Lstate ami Collections 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Buy The Famous 

Overiand Automobiie 

First Class Automobile Repairing 
A Complete Line of Sporting Goods 

GEO. A. FISHER 

KT.IZABETHTOWN. - PENNA. 



p [|yn| P Dry Goods, Notions, Foot- 



S. Market & Bainbridge Sts. 
ELIZABETHTOWN. - PA. 



Wear, Carpets, Linoleums 
and Oil Cloths 



Mention Onr College Times When Writing 



Breitigan's Regal Strain ' 




WE ARE AFTER YOU 



I Silver Plymouth Rocks I j 



The foundation to success lies in the getting ol the 4, 

right start. You can get the right start in Silver Ply- * 

mouth Rocks by getting a setting ol eggs, a pair, trio J 

or pen trcm my Hagerstown. Md., Philadelphia, Nor- ^ 

ristown, Columbia. Lebanon and Lilitz Prize-winners + 

The Silver Plymouth Rocks retain the utility quali- T 

ties of their cousins, the Barred Plymouth Rocks, and ^ 

have the extremely beautiful Plumage of the Dark + 
Brahma, a silvery white on a solid black. Write for 
circular and prices. 



James H. Breitigan 




Grain, Flour, 
Seeds, Hay, 
and Fertilizer. 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

Rheems, - - Pa. 

2 The latest current events ^ 



For Ladies and Gents, 
Who always are looking 
2 For good country cookin 



5 AT XISSIiEY'S 

I LUNCH AKD DINING ROOMS 

^ 14-16 E, Obestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 



cTVIR. cJTWAN 



We waDt you for a customer, so we 
tempt you with a store full of uncommon 
values. Come and bee them. Sooner 
or later you are ttoing to lind out the 
advantage of (juality, service and price, J 



to be obtained here. The sooner 
do it the better it will be for vou. 



,'OU 



vi/ 



'fy 




i*/ i 



Our customers are all pleased custom- 
ers, because we really stand back of 
everything we sell. 



MARTIN 

Clothier and Furnisher 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronac;e. 



I THE ^ BOOK ^ store! 



Books, Stationery, School 

Supplies and Post 

Cards 



Sunday School Supplies 

and Mottoes 

Mail Orders Solicited 



I C. N. FALKENSTEIIM, Elizabethtown, Pa. | 



ipatnttno anb Ipaper 
Ibanotng 

AMOS B. DRACE 

J. M. BENNER 

FREIGHT, BAGGAGE and EXPRESS 
Furniture, Pianos, Machinery 

PLATE GLASS A SPECIALTY. 

ELIZABETHTOWN. PENNA. 


^ ^ 

S. G, GRAYBILL 
College Hill Dairy 

Fresh milk an.l ciearii .lailv. All milk 
tested for children; free fron. tiil-erculosis 

HOTELS «ND FAMILIES SUPPLIED ^ 


zA. W. MARTIN 

COAL, WOOD. GRAIN 
FLOUB and FEED 

Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 


TAKE YOURo 

Laundry to Fisher's 

i.eaves every Tuesday and Thursday moruins;. 
Returns Wednesday and Friday afternoon. 

J. RALPH GROSS 


[[ THE BARBER || 


ELIZABETHTOWX, - PENNA. 







I O. iV. HEISEY I 



Provisions, Groceries, CS, Choice Candies ^ 



HEISEY nUII>DING 



ELIZABETHTOWX. - PENNA. ^ 




€01 n-t tnx 




ADVKRSITY— A BLESSING 8 

WOMAN'S SPHERE IN THE BUSINESS WORLD. 9 

AN ALASKAN WINTER TRAIL 12 

EDITORIALS 14 

RESOLUTIONS OF SYMPATHY 16 

CHAPEL TALKS 16 

SCHOOL NOTES 17 

SOCIETY NEWS 18-19 

DEPARTMENT WORK 19 

DEPARTMEXr OF PEDAGOGY 20 

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 21 

BIBLE AND RELIGIOUS WORK 21 

ALUMNI 23 

RELIGIOUS APPOINTMENTS 24 

EXCHANGES . • 25 



Cur Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage 

EVERYBODY'S STORE^ 



KLI55ABETHTOWN 
PENNA. 



Your needs supplied at 
.satisfactory prices in Dry 
Goods, (itoceries, Keady- 
to-Wear Clothing tor .Men 
and Women of -ill ages, 
Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oil- 
cloth, Shoes, Ktc. 

Polite attention. 
Square dealing. 
Guaranteed satislaction. 




Asients fo r .Maiie-to- 



CLOTHrNG 

Iiiternalioual Tailoring Co. 
New York 

Star Tailoring Co. 

Chicago. 

American Ladies Tailoring Co. 

Chicago 

Up-tn-Date Samples 

On Hand 



HERTZLER BROTHERS AND COMPANY 

W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AAROX H. MARTI X. Cashier. 



U. S. DEPOSITORY 

Ellzabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits Over $145,000.00 

OeneraJ .Accounts Solicited. Interest paid op 
special de|H>sits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 











DIRECTORS 




W. S. Smith 


Elmer W. Strickler 


Peter N. Rutt 


P. W. Groff 


J. S. Rlsser 


B. L. Geyer 


E. C. Ginder 


Amos G. Coble 


B. E. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



*'The House of Good Clothes" 




BRANDEGEE KINCAID & COJ 
CLOTHES. 



Get that At tumn Suit or Overcoat ott your mind and on your back. A "High 
" Model will compliment your taste and your tailor. 

"THE STORE ACCOMMODATING" 

S. M. MYERS 6l CO., l\kt: 

CLOTHIERS. HATTERS AND FURNISHERS 



Our Advertisers are Wortliy of Your Patronage. 
♦ ♦ ♦♦ ♦ ♦♦4-» » - H i**' H i4i*- l"l"l ' **»* *»**t I IIIBIIIIBIIIHIIIIIBIIIIBIIiailllBIIIIIBIIIHIIIIII 



SHOES 



More and more 
EUzabe t h t o w n 
feet are getting 
the habit of keep- 
ing comp'ny with 
oar Shoe Depart- 
ment. There's a 
reason of coarse. 
Prices very, very 
easy on the parse 
and easy on the 
feet. Shoes for 
for the whole 
family. 



Huntzberger-Winters Co. | 

Department Store 




ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



This space is reserved for 
The ELIZABETHTOWM 
& MARIETTA ELEC- 
TRIC LIGHT CO. 



3!A4i4i4iA4»4i4i4i' 



4i4-4>4-4>4>4>? {IB91IBIIIIBII!IBllllBli;iBllilB:iJBIIIIBinBllilBII!IBIi;!B:; 



liBI»IBNIIIi^[nBlin"'1li!l{IHI1IIBIIIIIBIIIII>;iia""ll':IIBi!niBi|ini! ±-i 

m r^nTTi»T>TAw„„.mi;<T^oT>..cs | * ^g EARNESTLY SOLICIT A 



COLUMBIAN and RED CROSS 

I Heaters and Ranges, l i 

i THE FINEST LINES MADE | * 

I I 




Jos. H. Rider & Son 



LIBERAL PATRONAGE 
FOR 

LUMBER 



AND MILL-WORK 

Cement. Slate, 

Sackett Plaster Board, 

I'atent Plaster, 

liubei'oid Roofing, 

White Coat, 

Mapes & .Miller's Fertilizer, 

Ruberine Paint, 

and all kinds ot 
Building Material. 
We anil to give a scjuare deal that wi 
merit your trade and friendship. 
Give us a trial. 

MUTH BROTHERS. 
ELIZ.MJKTHTOWX, - PEXNA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



■iiiiaiiiiaiiiiiBiiii<aiinaiii!!ii!iaii!'iaiii:iBHiiBiiiiiBiiiaiiiiBiiiiie 
GET THIS BIG | 

POULTRY REFERENCE BOOK ■ 




GREISER'S FINE CATALOG 

l'JV2 has 224 pp containing ST pictures of show fo\ 
in natural colors. Largest and most practical pouli 
book published for experienced raisers Its text :s 



_ B. H.GREIDER.BoxCRHEEMS PA. ■ 

d B:i:iBii;B:'BiBi:S/B<;ia: 'm>:.m.:m:m" » m" 

•>.«««««««««««««««««« *********** 

f * 

* » 

J You Can Improve Your * 



♦ By Subscribing for 

♦ THE BUSINESS EDUCATOR 
* 

♦ By Practicing from 

♦ THE ZANER METHOD MANUAL 

J; or By Attending 

« THE ZANERIAN COLLEGE 



♦ For Circulars, Prices. Etc. ♦ 

* Apply to J 

I ZANER & BLOSER CO. | 

^ Penmanship Specialists ^ 

t Columbus, - - Ohio t 

« » 



We Are Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
Made To Order 

Plain 
Clothing 

In This Country 



When in Lancaster it will pay 
you to visit ours, the only 
Clothing Store in that city that 
has One Price to All and gives 
discounts to none. See us for 



Men's Ready Made and 
Made to Order 

Clothing 

AND 

Furnishings 



Youth's and Boys' 
Clothing 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Since i!So4 at 
Centre Square, Next to City Hall 

Lancaster. Pa. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 




Underwood 

Standard 

Typewriter 



Employment Department 

YOU CAN get from us the stenographer or operator you need. 
We maintain an Employrnent Department where applicants for 
positions are tested and graded. We know their capabilities and 
supply the most efficient workers for the salary the employer will pay. 
This service is absolutely free to both parties. It is an invaluable conve- 
nience to employers and a boon to hundreds of young people who obtain 
through it their means of livelihood. It is merely one phase of UNDER- 
WOOD service. 

The majority of the machines in the schools and business colleges are 
Underwoods. 

"The Machine You Will Eventually Buy." 

25 N. 3rcl St., Harrisburg, Pa. 



(§m (EoUpgf ®tmp0 



Elizabethtown, Pa., November, 1911 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Klizal.eth Myt-r Editor-in-Chief 

W. K. (iish, '14 ' School Notes 

Miimie Keller, 'IL' Society News 

Levi Ziegler, '18 Society News 

W. F. EshelmaD, '12 Exchanges 

Leah M. Sheatfer, '03 Alumni Editor 

Ralph \V. Schlosser, '11 Business Manager 

Daisy P. Rider, '10 Art Editor 



I'ublished monthly during the school year. 

1 his iiMppr will be sent continuously to old subscribers, so as not to break their tiles, and ar 
maes charged, unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration. 
Address all business communications to the Business .Manager. 
Terras: 5U cents per year; single copies, 10 cents. 



I I 



IMPORTANT! STUDENTS I 



DO YOU KNOW THAT 

T IS imly liecausf of tlie kind patronage of our business^ and our profes. 
siiinal men in this trnvn and elsewhere, that this magazine- exist?;. They 
have indeed shown tliemselvei« friends of Our College and of " Our Col- : 



^ lege Times."' 

Tlierefi)re, we justly and fairly may ask you, wlien alwut to laiy any- 



tliing, tn consider first those who hy their advertising have made this maga 
< I zine )>iis-;il)le. 
> We have solicited only advertisers who are reliahle in all respects. : 

READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS i 

BUSINESS MANAGER OF "OUR COI.I.E6E TIMES' 



Adversity— A Blessing 



Christ L. Martin, '13 



ALL earth is seized with cahn- 
ness. The sun has risen tri- 
umphantly to his magnificent 
throne in the sky and pours out his 
blessing in abundance to all below. 

We turn our eyes to the western 
horizon and behold the clouds slowly 
gathering. We are aware that some 
mighty power is at work. We watch 
eagerly minute after minute, moment 
after moment, with a look of mingled 
fear and anxiety. As we behold their 
approach increasing in violence and 
rapidity, as they near us rolling, boil- 
ing, foaming, tossing in mad confus- 
ion and anger, the streaks of lightning 
flashing, peals of thunder crashing, the 
wind tossing the trees, twisting and 
turning every fiber, the rain gushes to 
the earth, the streams swell and rush 
on -n mad confusion to their destina- 
tio 1. The clouds disappear. The haze 
has left the sky. How sweet the air ! 
How beauitful and fresh all plant life! 
How exceedingly liright the sun after 
the rain ! 

In a log cabin in Kentucky lived a 
youth, poor as the poorest, humble as 
the humblest, eager as the eagerest. 
He had few opportunities but adversi- 
ties instead. In his heart was a desire 
to become great and a longing to serve 
humanity, before his eyes a lofty aim, 
in jiis large immortal soul a craving to 
reach it, and in the very marrow of 
his bones a stirring ambition to strug- 
gle for it. Behold him a slim, slender 
lad. sheltered in a log cabin, an eager 
back woodsman splitting rails ff)r a 



livelihood. Behold him homely, 
though magnificent in stature, tread- 
ing the halls of a national capital and 
directing with his powerful mind the 
destiny of a nation. 

We see him first lowliest of the low- 
ly, humblest of the humble, eagerest of 
the eager, darkened by shadows of 
earth, but reflecting an image of heav- 
en, he struggles on. on. on. He does 
his appointed task, reaches his goal, 
and it is finished. He flies to his home 
beyond. A world mourns ; a host of 
angels rejoice. And while our nation 
IS enduring the awful pangs of sorrow, 
melodies descend from the throne, 
pouring upon it a benediction never to 
be forgotten. Thus he has made his 
adversities his stepping stones, rejoic- 
ing as he rose and surmounted each. 

Go with me to Gethsemane. Be- 
hold the Savior. Before Him were the \ 
adversities of a world; behind Him a ' /> ] 
mad, blood-thirsty, howling, sinful, Z'^^'^*-*^ 
rabble. At His CQnimand were a host 
of angels^Jm^ir'His'jieart the desire 
to do the will of His Father. With 
drops of blood issuing from His brow, 
He struggles in awful agony, then lays 
down His life for His cause. Behold 
the Son of God bearing the sins of a 
world, thus raised to a higher place in 
the heavens ! 

Thus we see the law of adversity un- 
iversal. Nothing will progress unless 
there l)e opposition. Xo plant of value 
exists without its pests : no creature, 
without its enemies: no righteous man 
without his foes. \\'crc there no sor- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



row. joy would not be. Were there 
no mountains to climb, heights would 
not be reached. Were there no adver- 
sities, blessings would remain unap- 
preciated. 

Show me a man born to poverty 
with a will to overcome and we have 
before us a mighty giant of power. 
Show me a man born to luxury and 
ease and we have before us a mere 
hot house flower only to fade and with- 
er, when the needs of a world fall up- 
on it. 

He who has cares and adversities 
to overcome may well rejoice, for an 
adversity overcome is a step toward 
God. The ladder by which we rise 
from the lowlj' earth to the vaulted 



skies is built with rounds of adversity. 
An adversity missing, a round is miss- 
ing. Have you vain passions? Slay 
them. Have you ills? Vanquish them. 
Is there any good? Gain and mas- 
ter it. We rise only by the things 
that are under our feet. 

Have you an aim confronted by 
many adversities to be overcome? 
Gird yourself w-ith the earnestness of 
youth, rush wisely and discreetly to 
the front, seize the banner, climb the 
heights, plant it there, wear on your 
head the golden crown of glory, hold 
in your hand the palm of victory and 
proclaim to all the world with the 
voice of a trumpet : "Victory is to him 
onlv who will win. 



Woman's Sphere In The Business 
World 



Anna 'W. Wolgemnth. '08 



NOT so many, many j-ears ago 
it was thought by most peo- 
ple that woman's only place 
in the world was in the home. Not 
so todaj', for she has shown to the 
world that she is also capable of fill- 
ing many of the other responsible 
positions in life. The modern woman 
is no longer the incompetent creature 
she used to be. "She has taken a self- 
respecting and self-relying position 
by the side of her brother, and claims 
for her birth-right one half the 
world." 

The woman born fifty years ago 
had very little chance to become in- 
dependent. Three avenues for self- 
support were open to her. She could 



trim a hat. serve in the kitchen, or 
teach a school, and. as these vocations 
were soon over-crowded, wages were 
small, and there was nothing left for 
her to do. Not so to-day. Xo girl 
need stand still and wait for a posi- 
tion. The world has thrown its doors 
open wide into all the walks of busi- 
ness life, and woman is invited! to 
enter. Whether her compensations 
be five or twenty-five dollars per week 
depends entirely upon her own efforts 
to fit herself properly for the work re- 
quired of her. 

What the business world is looking 
for at the present age is men and 
w^omen who are qualified to load upon 
themselves the duties and responsi- 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



bililies that unmistakably devolve up- 
on those who enter upon this career, 
— persons in whom they can place 
iheii entire confidence, and know that 
tiic work received at their hands is 
void of errors and infallible. In short, 
ivhat the business world is in search 
01 to-day is honest, painstaking, ac- 
curate men and women. If, then, this 
high standard of qualification is found 
iu the female applicant, why should 
she not be accepted for the position 
a': readily as her competent brother? 
In the school, woman has proved her- 
self to be her brother's equal, and 
ef imes superior. She has many times 
stood at the head of her class in the 
1 Tniversities and Colleges of our Un- 
ion. If this is true of the school, cer- 
tainly the same can be true of the 
b • iness world. 

Let us note a few women who have 
achieved some distinction in this 
?i here. Mist Rose L. Fritz, the 
ivorld's champion typist, is a brilliant 
CN'ponent of her se.x in the business 
w(jrld. This woman has made many 
surprisingly brilliant records in her 
career, and ranks second to none. 
-Many are the instances of her cham- 
pionship recorded throughout the 
'A-orld. 

The founder and manager of "The 
l-'air." one of Chicago's greatest de- 
partment stores, is a woman. So are 
ihe confidential secretaries of H. H. 
Logers of the Standard Oil Co.. and 
M. C. Prick, the iron king, both of 
which positions are responsible 
enough, and these women are well 
p lid for filling them. 

Harriet Beeclier Stowe, speaking of 
ini^iness education for young women, 
.•«:i d : "Xo young woman could have 



a better safe-guard against the ad- 
\ersities of life, or a better resource 
in iime of need, than a knowledge of 
be -keeping and business affairs." 
The business girl of to-day is not -i 
child in knowledge of the world, and 
she should not be, if she is going out 
into Its perils. If she goes to the city 
to find a market for her brains, she 
v. iil know how to guard herself from 
its perils as well as the young man. 
Tlie question is sometimes asked, 
can women keep business secrets.'' 
\ hatever may be the general opinion 
:ii,arding the inability of wornen to 
keoi) secrets, the actions of thousands 
of stenographers and other business 
'.v.)iren. who are faithful to their 
trusts, jire answering this question 
most emphatically in the affirmative 
1Ti£ le-v instances in which they have 
1 f tvH} "d the confidence entrusted to 
:h 1 are hut the exceptions that 
pri'-.o the rule. One may question 
'whether women have not a keener 
sense of business ethics than men. 
Certainly the loyalty of women to 
their employers is the more remark- 
able because they receive, as a rule, a 
smaller salary than that paid to men. 
Xot only is the .\merican girl able 
in keep business secrets, but she is 
a'.-', very reticent about telling of the 
( o.is made to secure valuable infor- 
mation irm her. Following is the 
ace >;Mit of two inst;:rces in which the 
ijirl- ;(.n:-e of business honor was 
stronger than the "love of money." 

.\ >'( ii(i: iapher in a large real es- 
state oiriic became aware of a deal 
ir. Aliic'i. SI. =^0,000 was involved. Cer- 
tain information she possessed would 
he w.irti: 'liousands to the other par- 
ties. Tin v made a few advances, and 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



hintoil ; • rewards as high as $5000 
fir lur upiiaya! of her firm. She in- 
c'.iu;iia;Ti:_\ le fused, and told her em- 
pi;)-, irs oi the scheme. It never en- 
lu'-."' i^i i-.nd of that young woman 
♦r bi'lrr.j l.cr trust. 

Anoilu'-.- stenographer was offered 
$if OC/ i' ■• cc^pies of ihree letters which 
^hc iirci u'l tten. A law suit in which 
her i.'tn]), overs were involved might 
li;i\ I JifMit; against them had the op- 
pi'.-iii,^ pi'.rty been able to secure th^t 
ii'i -maiion contained in the three let- 
t".-?. 'i'lii' lawyer for the other side 
Liid ten olC'G bills on her mother's 
i.ible. .-re! "Lid her they were hers for 
the permission to read the letters. 
The girl scorned the offer as an at- 
tempt to bribe her to do a dishonor- 
able and dishonest act. and never 
even told her employers about it. 

Woman's ver}^ presence, if she is 
a true type of her sex. has a quieting 
and refining influence. Many are the 
instances presented to our notice 
where her presence among men is 
a signal to refrain from uncouth lan- 
guage and rude or boisterous conduct. 
Certainly we will all admit that a 
noble. Christian woman has a wide- 
spread influence wherever she goes, 
and in no sphere can this influence 
for good be more widelj^ felt than in 
the realms of business, where she is 
brought into close touch with busy, 
bustling men. Business men often 
become so engrossed and imbued 
with the spirit of the business in 
which they are engaged that they lose 
sight of all that is high and noble ; 
they are those in whom the little 
spark of Christianity, still flickering, 
becomes so nearly extinguished dur- 
ing the six long, busy days of the 



week, that the quiet Sabbath is hard- 
ly able to rekindle it. If woman's 
sphere in the business world to-day 
were no greater than to shed a ray of 
light upon this frenzied world of fin- 
ance, to lead these men to nobler 
thoughts and actions by her own acts 
of sincerity, truthfulness, and justice, 
it would still be far too great a sphere 
to be left unfilled. 

All women, whether rich or poor, 
should understand business methods. 
The rich need such knowledge to 
properly care for their possessions, 
and to maintain themselves should 
fortunes be swept away, as so often 
happens. Xo young woman should 
fail to fortify herself against possible 
adversity, and she can best do this 
by availing herself of a thorough 
knowledge of business. With this 
knowledge, the woman who is thrown 
upon her own resources becomes in- 
dependent, and has broad avenues of 
self-support thrown open to her ; 
while, on the other hand, the woman 
who is ignorant of the methods of 
business, in such event, is often left 
to the mercy of those trained in fraud 
and deception. She is deceived by 
those pretending to aid or protect 
her. and is left penniless and perhaps 
homeless in the end. 

Mary A. Livermore has said. "If 
I were able, I would change the pub- 
lic sentiment so radically that no girl 
should be considered well educated, 
no matter what her accomplishments, 
until she has learned a trade, a busi- 
ness, a vocation, or a profession. Self- 
-support would then be possible to 
her. and she would not drift on the 
current of life, a part of its useless 
driftwood." 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



An Alaskan Winter Trail 



W. K. Gish, '04 



WHEN one speaks of the trail 
of the far North he may refer 
to a surveyed mail route with 
its occasional pointers in dangerous 
places, to a path between two villages, 
which is usually obliterated by every 
storm; or, as is often the case, simply 
a general direction by which the trav- 
eler can the more easily reach a cer- 
tain section of the country. Men may 
be met traveling on foot, with donkey, 
dogs, or reindeer — not all however in 
•the same district. Along all main 
trails may be found a few roadhouses 
kept especially for the accommodation 
of the traveler. 

There is perhaps, nowhere in all 
Alaska a more interesting and diver- 
sified trail than the surveyed mail 
route between Circle, a small post on 
the upper Yukon, and Fairbanks, the 
largest camp on the Tanana. 

In company with a friend, I spent 
a week on this trail as the North 
Land was just waking out of its long 
winter sleep. Despite the hardships 
of winter travel, our trip from the 
,very start was both delightful and 
profitable ; for no one, however dulled 
and blunted his perception of things 
spiritual, can follow this lone way thru 
the fireat A\'hite Silence without mar- 
velling at the manifold revelations of 
this vast romantic wild. It is that 
domain of Nature where she speaks 
not thru delicate flowers but rather 
thru gorgeous skies: not thru the dew- 
drop but the diamond ; not thru the 
songs of birds but the music of the 
pines. 



Being disposed to make this a pleas- 
ure trip rather than a piece of hard 
work, we decided to go on foot each 
carrying a small pack of necessaries. 
Hut, as the day on which we had 
planned to leave Fairbanks was cold 
and stormy, we took the noon train 
that runs to Chatanika, a mining camp 
thirty miles out along the trail. 

To one accustomed to travel in the 
eastern states this Tanana \^alley 
railroad seems a curious affair indeed. 
The train is scheduled to run three 
times a week. On this particular day 
it consisted of two little engines burn- 
ing wood, two box cars and one pas- 
senger coach. We left Fairbanks 
three hours late and sped along thru 
the storm no less than six miles an 
hour. After about two hours the 
drifts became quite a problem for the 
little old engines. They would back 
the train a few hundred yards and 
make another attempt to break thru 
and yet another until the passengers 
had a fairly good idea of the quality 
of the spring backs, and for the time 
lost had the pleasure of an occasional 
extra mile of travel. This performance 
was continued until far into the night 
and until the wood and water supply 
was entirely exhausted, but the crew 
shoveled snow into the tanks and the 
conductor and manaeer chopped up 
small trees tor fuel. We finally did get 
thru and had resumed our former speed 
when we suddenly stopped again in a 
big drift and were unable to move 
either forward or backward. After a 
long wait we were informed that the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



snow plow was out of order and that 
it was our fortune that we could not 
break the drift for the broken plow 
would surely have derailed us while 
crossing the chasm a few rods ahead. 
As we had no inclination to travel 
on foot in that storm, we spent the 
rest of the night in the coach — some 
dreaming of the meal they expected 
to have that evening at the camp. 
others content to listen to the storm 
burying us deeper every hour. In the 
morning all on board got busy; some 
with shovels, some at the plow, and 
still others laid in a new supply of 
wood and snow. All arrived safe at 
Chatanika late in the afternoon. 

Having spent the evening and the 
night at this camp, we started in the 
morning for Faith Creek cabin forty- 
five miles to the northeast. The day 
was ideal with the temperature only 
twenty below zero and no indication 
whatever of any storm. Hour after 
hour we slowly moved over that tun- 
dra like two small objects driven by 
the breeze over a sea of snowy bil- 
lows, while far ahead of us lay the 
spruce and pine forests beyond which 
rose the mighty mountains. Late in 
the evening we entered the timber at 
the base of the hills and built our lit- 
tle camp for the night. We tramped 
hard a small patch of snow, cut down 
a few spruce trees for fuel, saving the 
branches for our bed. 

As we sat there by the fire thawing 
our bacon and beans the light fell full 
upon my companion's face revealing 
against the dark back ground the per- 
fect type of a brave, determined yet 
sympathetic face of a Te.xan cowboy. 
After a few moments I remarked, "I 
■wanted to ask vou, Scott, how vou 



ever got attached to this country as 
you are?" "Well, pard," said he, "to 
tell you the truth, God only knows 
why I left my home in the south to 
roam round the pole. I'm always cold 
but the land of gold seems to hold me 
like a spell. I'm happy and I'll never 
return to the south for I know I'd just 
be longing for the things I left behind. 
And more than that, pard. I claim 
this land for my home. By the trails 
I've broken, the peaks I've scaled, the 
battles fought and the lessons learned 
I claim this land as my own." 

.-\ltho at this time of the year 
Northern Alaska has but a few hours 
daylight — a beautiful blending of 
dawn and twilight — yet the cool clear 
nights are never dark for the marvel- 
ous Aurora, whether it appear in the 
form of massive domes and arches, in 
flowing s' reams of colors, or in shift- 
ing scenes of floating banners and 
waving tapestries, whatever its form, 
it is always flooding the land with a 
calm and soothing light. 

The next day we followed the wind- 
ing trail thru the timber where occa- 
sional boughs bending low with their 
weight of pearl formed beautiful arch- 
ways thru which we seemed to obtain 
admittance into a new province. Fin- 
ally we entered the mountains passing 
thru deep ravines and by steep cliffs, 
scaring at times a moose or mountain 
goat from behind a sheltering rock. 
We had traveled fast all day as we 
were anxious to reach Faith Creek 
cabin er.rly in the evef.ir.g. A\'e 
thought we had but a few more miles 
when we heard, some little distance 
ahead of us, the sharp report of a 
rifle. Thinking the shot fired by the 
keeper of the cabin, we thought no 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



more of it until a little later when we 
saw thru the dim light something 
moving awkardly about on the trail 
ahead of us. Clutching his revolver 
my companion said, "Pard, be care- 
ful." We stood still for a few. mom- 
ents while the object crouched in the 
snow, then slowly we approached. 
Again it moved as Scott shouted, "Ho 
there." ^^'e got no answer save a deep 
low moan. "Speak or I'll shoot." Still 
no reply. Then right over the body 
were fired two. heavy shots. In the 
dark we could not discern any move- 
ment of the object but as we cautious- 
ly made our way to it we saw that it 
was a man in an utterly helpless condi- 



tion. All around him the snow was 
torn up and stained with blood. His 
rifle lay at his side. "Friend, what's 
the matter?" said my partner, but 
the only answer given was, "Let me 
alone to die." Not satisfied with this 
reply I said, "Can't you tell us what 
happened.^" at the same time turning 
him on his side. Yet I received no 
more satisfaction than, "Don't, you 
hurt me." ]\Iy companion and I 
agreed that regardless of his agon}", 
and protestations, we should carry 
liim to the cabin. This we did but 
when we got there we saw that every 
sign of life had fled. 




November. Vp abo\e, the Tree with leaf unfading 

By the everlasting River's brink: 

Down below, the wild November .\nd the Sea of Glass beyond whose 

whistling. margin 

Through the beeches" dome of burn- Never yet the Sun was known to 

ing red. sink. 

.And the .Autumn sprinkling peniten- W. ALEX.ANDER. 



Dust and ashes on the chestnut's May thy soul he as beautiful as the 

head. .Antunui starlight, which silvers all 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



tlif sleeping- world. Thou needest not 
make any stir or commotion, — only 
shine. Shine as if God were reflected 
from thy being — Year Book of Encj- 
li-ji Authors. 

.Ml hail Thankst^ivin^;- Day! Novem- 
ber 30! 

The first number of our College 
Lecture Course is a thing of the past 
')nt we trust its good effects have 
been many. 

'l"he next number of the Course 
will be an illustrated lecture by Prof. 
H. .K. Ober. Subject. "The .\merican 
Boy." Don't forget to come to t!ic 
College on the evening of Dec. 14tli, 
to hear this lecture. 

Xov. 13th, is the Anniversary of the 
Founding of the College. The com- 
mittee on anniversaries for this year 
consists of H. K. Ober, J. Z. Herr, 
Anna Wolgemuth, and Eld. S. H. 
Hertzler. This committee will do 
what they can to make the program 
on this occasion both entertaining and 
profitable. Let all who are interested 
keep a watch on the College Notes in 
the town papers through which the 
different features of the program will 
be announced. 

Every member of the Alumni As- 
sociation can show his loyalty by sub- 
scribing for Our College Times. Our 
subscription list is growing. Who'll 
be the next to push forward this good 
work ? 

Let the readers of Our College 
Times please send us the names and 
addresses of any of their acquaintan- 
ces who think of going away to school. 
The management of Elizabethtown 



College highly appreciates the many 
kind words which our old students 
and friends have to say about us. 

If you are interested in College 
work, send your name and address to 
i'res. D. C. Reber. and you will receive 
a copy of our catalogue. 

( )ur b^all Term ends Thursday, 
Nov. 30. Winter Term begins Mon- 
day. Dec. 4. You should engage a 
r<iom for the Winter Term now. 

Bible Term 

TO those of our friends who are 
looking forward to the Bible 
Term, we announce that it 
opens on Thurs., Jan. 11, and contin- 
ues ten days. Make your plans now 
so that you may be able to attend 
this Bible .'■"ession either a day or two, 
(ir the entire ten days. 

The calamity which recently occcur- 
red at Austin, Pa., has been the means 
of awakening feelings of sympathy 
throughout Pennsylvania and in many 
other parts of our country. It is grati- 
fying to note the readiness on the part 
of our people to contribute of their 
funds towards making the homeless 
and destitute as happy and comforta- 
ble as possible. We are glad to say 
that the citizens of Elizabethtown are 
alive to their duty, and that the papers 
announce that contributions will be 
received for this cause at a number 
of the general stores in Elizabeth- 
town. The Sunday School of the 
Church of the Brethren of Elizabeth- 
town have sent in quite a liberal do- 
nation. Perhaps other Sunday Schools 
and church congregations have done 
likewise. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Thanks ! 

\\e take this means of expressing 
our many thanks to Mr. and Mrs. Ez- 
ra Gish for allowing the school in its 
Annual Outing to roam over their 
hills in search of chestnuts, for the 
large r.umber of chestnuts gathered, 
for the use of their lawn for lunch 
and social purposes, and for all oth- 
er favors .<o kindlv granted to us on 
Oct. 14th. 

Chapel Talks 

Friday, Oct. 13, was set apart by the 
Faculty Social Committee as the time 
for "Private Talks" to our young men 
and young women respectively. Miss 
Cora R. Price, of Lancaster, who last 
summer heard Mrs. Wood Allen Chap- 
man deliver an address to a body of 
women attending the Christian En- 
deavor Conference held at Atlantic 
City, was requested to come to the 
College and give the talk to the 
young ladies at this time. Miss Price 
presented much wholesome advice 
concerning the all important matters 
relating to true womanhood, in beau- 
tiful language and charming manner. 
That her talk was appreciated was 
manifested in the attentive, medita- 
tive expression on the faces of our 
girls, .and by eyes filled with tears 
For, as a certain author puts it. -"The 
heart must speak when the lips are 
dumb." 



Elizabethtown College deems these 
private talks on subjects which are 
not often found in textbooks, as a- 
mor.g the most important elements of 
true, all-round education. 



Resolutions of Sympathy. 

SINCE God in His infinite wis- 
dom has seen fit to call from 
His earthly duties to His 
Eternal Home, the kind step-father of 
our friend and fellow student, Eva R. 
LJrubaker, be it resolved : 

First. As this holme is bereft of a 
faithful father and- companion, we 
commend the sorrowing mother and 
children in this hour of affliction, to 
the kind Heavenly Father, who doeth 
all things well. 

Second. That we. the Faculty and 
students of Elizabethtown College, do 
hereby most sincerelly tender our 
heartfelt s\-nipathy to the berea\-ed 
family. 

Third. That a copy of these reso- 
lutions be sent to the bereaved fami- 
l.v. 

I'ourth, That these resolutions be 
published in the Elizabethtown papers 
and in ( )ur College Times. 

Com M. Irene Sheetz. 

Christ L. Martin. 
Jacob Z. Herr, 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




«»« «^CHO0LJH0TE:Z>*a# 



NoTcSf 



K 




YoumuitSup 



Pl» Trie Cav 



iA 



The many friends of W. E. Glas- 
mire will be sorry to learn that his 
father has been seriously ill for the 
last seven weeks. During all this time 
he has taken scarcely any food, only a 
little milk, and one is made to wonder 
at the vitality manifested. 

The school had its annual chestnut 
outing on October fourteenth at 
Wood Lawn Farm, three miles south 
of town. A number of conditions con- 
spired to make this excursion a very 
pleasant one. All were anxious for it, 
the day was ideal, and chestnuts were 
found in abundance. The school left 
the College campus at eight o'clock. 
By noon the majority had as many 
nuts as they cared to have and all 
gathered around the buildings where 
lunch was served on the lawn. The 
afternoon was spent in a social way, 
some remaining at the buildings, oth- 
ers boating, shooting, and rambling 
over the hills. All returned to College 
in a body in time for supper. 

The classes in physical culture for 
gentlemen are at present working on 
■drills, some of which will be included 
in the public exposition for students 
at the end of the term. 

Investigate how Mr. Resser proves 
that two chestnuts and three chest- 



nuts are one chestnut 

Prof. Schlosser addressed the child- 
rens' meeting at Palmyra on October 
15th. On the 8th he preached at Eliz- 
abethtown, and on the first at Cone- 
wago where he also addressed the 
Sunday School. The Sunday before 
he visited at home, giving a sermon at 
Akron. 

Ask Mr. Rose for the secret of be- 
ing happy in rainy weather. 

The first number of the Lecture 
Course was given on October 19th by 
Dr. Stanley, subject, — "Young Men 
and Women of Japan". 

Addresses were recently given in 
the interest of the Anti-Saloon League 
by Dr. Reber at York, and by Prof. 
Ober at Mechanicsburg and Carlisle. 

Prof. Ober addressed the Sunday 
School at Palmyra and the childrens' 
meeting at Annville on October 8th. 
He also spoke at Springville on Oct- 
ober 15th. 

Alpha Hall, Room 9— "What's the 
matter. I smell- cabbage burning." 
"Don't know, chum, your head's rath- 
er close to that oil stove. 

Inquire of Mr. L. how to become a 
prominent man of letters. 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Levi Zeigler preached the Sunday 
morning sermon in the College chap- 
el ( )ctober 15th. He also preached 
two sermons at Harrisburg recently. 

r.eceiit \ isitors at the College were: 
Mr.-. : lathias of Thila ; :\Iiss Adams 
of Liti'z; .Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Gil)- 
ble. Manheim :Harrison Ober, Kissel 
Hill ; /\.mo.-, Hottenstein, East Peters- 
burg; Elma (jber. Manheim ; LeRoy 
Grolif. New Holland: Edna Martin, 
Ephrala. 

Miss Sheaffer attended the Child- 
rers' meeting at Palmyra, October 
L^th : Mr. Long visited at York and 
Mechanicsburg; Mr. Zeigler at Lanc- 
aster. 

The class of 1912 has organized 
with the following officers : Pres., Wal- 
ter Eshleman ; Vice Pres., Virgil Hol- 
sin:.er: Sec, Mamie Keller; Treas., 
Ire:--e Sheetz ; Poet, C. L. Martin; 
Historian, W'm. Christman ; Prophet, 
Irene Sheetz. 

The members of the class are as 
follows : 

College Preparatory course, — Wal- 
ter Eshleman, Albert Reber,'and Wm. 
Christman ; Pedagogical course, Ma- 
mie Keller and Harry Xye ; Wm. 
Kulp is completing the English Bible 
course, and Gussie Barclay the Music 
Teachers' course: Gertrude Miller, 
Rhoda Miller, ( )rpha Harshbcrger. 
Irene Sheetz, C. L. Martin and Or- 
ville Becker are finishing the English 
Scientific ; Regular Commercial 
course, — Gertrude Keller, Ava \\'it- 
nier, Condry Long, I. O. Foreman, 
Fred Burgess, Russel Shank, and 
Paul Landis. 



Homerian News. 

THE Homerian Literary So- 
ciety is making progress. The 
committee appointed to draw 
up by-laws to the constitution are 
busy, and the organizatio:i of the So- 
ciety will be complete in the near fu- 
ture. 

Many students who have censured 
the Society for being asleep had their 
itching ears allayed on Friday even- 
ing, Oct. 13, when the Homerians 
rendered a stirring public program in 
Society H?J1. 

The chaplain. Prof. J. G. Meyer, in 
a s rious, reverential manner read 
from the "Sacred \'olume a chapter 
of his choice," and followetl with a 
prayer fitting to the occasion. 

}Jiss Leah M. Sheaffer, the instru- 
r-ental music instructor, then favor- 
ed the audience with a piano solo. The 
selection was "Sonata Pathetic." by 
Beethoven. Miss Sheaffer's achieve- 
ments along musical lines are such 
as are rarely equalled. 

A recitation entitled "The Painter of 
Seville," was given next by Mamie 
Keller. Following this Mr. Chas. E. 
Resser gave a discussion on "Some- 
thing on the Cosmos in its Relation 
to the Microcosmic .Atom." He tried 
ito make at least one person think 
and we believe he accomplished his 
inirpose. 

Prof. ^V. K. (jish then impersonated 
.\ct I\' of "The Merchant of Venice." 
He held the undivided attention of the 
listeners and we are sure every one 
will remember the Jew. .An address 
by Prof. H. K. Ober on the subject of 
"Labor" followed. He did not fail to 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



throw the spirit of an orator into his 
address, and many helpful thoughts 
lingered in the minds of all, especial- 
ly the Honierians. 

The last feature was a quartet, 
•"Come Where my Love lies Dream- 
ing," sung by Misses Leah Shaeffer 
and Xora Reber, Prof. Schlosser and 
Mr. C. M. Neflf. 

The officers for the evening were : 
■Speaker, C. \I. Xeflf ; Secretary. Mamie 
Keller; Critic. Dr. D. C. Reber. 
Keystone L. S. Notes 

THE Ziegler administration 
closed Oct. 6. Many pleasant 
memories cluster around it, 
from the President's point of view. 
Indeed we hope that it has been one 
■of genera 1 helpfulness and uplift to 
the Society and an inspiration to those 
upon whom the honors of administra- 
tion have fallen. The following have 
been elected as officers for the present 
administration : — Pres. V. C. Hoking- 
er; Vice Pres., Edgar Diehm; Sec, 
Bessie \^'^io•ht : Editor, Maud Hertz- 
ler; Critic, Prof. R. W. Schlosser. 

We report the following new mem- 
bers: — Ruth Reber, Edna Brubaker, 
Elsie Adams. Mamie Price, Sara Wis- 
mer, Iva Spangler, Sara Moyer, Ber- 
tha Hollinger, Irene Sheetz. Anna a 
tha Hollinger. Irene Sheetz. .\nna 
Mathias, Paul M. Landis, H. M. Eb- 
erly and J. Ira Coble. 

The debates of the Society have 
been both entertaining and instruct- 
ive. We report the cjuestions debated 
as follows : 

Resolved, That it would be profita- 
ble to emphasize Literary Society 
work to the extent of one branch of 
the school curriculum. 



Resolved. That each student should 
take some \ocal and instrumental mu- 
sic lessons. 

Symposium. — Which is of greatest 
educational value. Physiolog}-, Geo- 
graphy or Physics? 

The Literary Program for Oct. 13, 
was postponed one week, that even- 
ing being given to the Homerians to 
hold a public meeting. 

The Homerians are beginning to 
"shine." But that makes no diflference. 
The Keystoners received new life 
somewhere, and they are just doing 
things, too. Don't forget that ! 

DEPARTMENT WORK 

Sewing Department 

THE Sewing Department has 
opened its work with the 
new school year. The 

work done at present is prospering. 
We are glad to welcome eleven 
young ladies who are taking up the 
work. They are, — Gertrude Eshle- 
man. Florin ; -Lizzie Gingrich, and 
Bertha Hollinger, of Lebanon ; Kath- 
ryn Myers, Mabel Heisey and Mary 
Hersh of Rheems; Ella Heisey, Ada 
Hess, Bessie Wright, Mamie Ginder 
and Martha Martin of Elizabethtown. 
Thy manifest good interest in the 
work. 

College Lecture Course. 

THE Lecture Course for 1911 
to '12 consists of six numbers 
as follows: Oct. 19, in College 
Chapel Dr. Frederick J. Stanley, of N. 
Y.. subject. "Young Men and Women 
of Japan." 

December 14. in College Chapel an 
illustrated lecture bv Prof. H. K. Ob- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



er entitled "The American Boy." 

January 4, in Heisey's auditorium 
an Elocutionary and Musical enter- 
tainment directed by Prof. George P. 
Bible of the National School of Elocu- 
tio;i and Oratory, Philadelphia. 

On February 2, in College Chapel, 
"American Morals" will be the sub- 
ject of a Iccutre by Dr. Byron C. Piatt 
of 111. 

On April 18 in College Chapel Dr. 
Frederick J. Stanley will give a sec- 
ond lecture entitled "The Supremacy 
of the Pacific, Occidental or Oriental." 

On May 10, in the College Chapel 
Dr. S. C. Schmnker, Professor of 
Biological Science in the West Ches- 
ter State Normal School, will give 
the last number of the course on the 
subject, "Some Interesting Supersti- 
tions." 

Department of Pedagogy. 

THE following subjects are 
taught during the Fall Term 
in this department which is 
,in charge of Pres. D. C. Reber: His- 
tory of Education, Educational Psy- 
chology, School Hygiene, Physiologi- 
cal Pedagogics, and Sociology. The 
class in Psychology, is studying the 
physical basis of the mind furnished 
by the nervous system and has enter- 
ed upon a detailed study of Sensation 
and Perception. 

Judd's Psychology has been recent- 
ly adopted as the text book in this 
clcass which will be supplemented by 
Dexter and Garlick's Psychology in 
the School Room. The class numbers 
two ladies and four gentlemen. 

The Pedagogical seniors are study- 
ing Monroe's Brief History of Edu- 
cation and have already made a care- 



ful study of Greek and Roman Edu- 
cation and is about finishing the study 
of education during the Middle Ages. 
In addition to the text book, numer- 
ous notes are given in class to sup- 
plement class instruction. 

In Sociology Gidding's Elements is 
again used as the text book. About 
ten weeks will be devoted to the study 
of nature, structure, and evolution of 
society after which sociology as re- 
lated to education will be carefully 
investigated. For this part of the 
course Dewey's School and .Society, 
Dewey's Educational Creed, and 
Grice's Home and School v/ill be read 
and discussed. Each member of the 
class is expected to write a paper on 
the Mission of the School in Society, 
bringing to his attention this newer 
tendency in education. . 

The class in School Hygiene has 
completed Barry's School Hygiene and 
has done much supplementary reading 
in Shaw's School Hygiene and Burr- 
age & Bailey's School Decoration. 
The course in Physiological Pedago- 
gies will consist of outlines in such 
subjects as Growth of Body. Exercise 
and Rest, the Physical Basis of Dull- 
ness and Precocity. Habit, .\doles- 
cence. Diseases of School Children, 
and Temperament as well as a careful 
reading of Halleck's Education of the 
Central Nervous Sy.stem. 

Agricultural Notes. 

ABOUT seventy bushels of 
sweet potatoes have been 
raised and stored for College 
use. Sufficient broom-corn was also 
grown to make all the brooms 
that the College will use during 
the vear. At this writing Mr. S. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



P. Dennis, our worthy janitor, is 
busily engaged in husking corn. He 
reports a fine crop.. The celery, cab- 
bage, and beets are being gathered to 
put away for winter use. The yield 
of the truck patch has been very sat- 
isfactory. The only failure we report 
thus far is the potato crop. 

The janitor is engaged in preparing 
a larger garden as well as in making 
seedbeds for cabbage plants, tomato 
plants, sweet-potato sprouts, lettuce, 
etc., V hich are to be growr> till next 
spring. It is the aim of the a^'ricul- 
tural department to grow all neces- 
sary plants. 

Science Department. 

WE are glad to report in this 
issue that those of our stu- 
dents taking courses in Physics 
and Chemistry are doing thorough 
work. Our laboratories have recent- 
ly been improved with splendid equip- 
ment for the use of those taking ad- 
vanced work in these subjects. 

Our College offers four conrses in 
Physics. The first-year's c-jurse is 
taken by our Pedagogical, English 
Scientific and College Prep, students 
The subject is pursued and thDrou;^h- 
ly covered as given by Millikan and 
Gale of Chicago University. The Soph- 
omores of the A. B. Course are taking 
our advanced course in General Col- 
kge and University Physic.-. 

Three courses will be given in 
Chemistry this year. Students pursu- 
ing courses ranking with those oflfer- 
ed by the Normal Schools of our 
state will complete the Elementary 
Chemistry during the Spring Term. 
The Sophomores of the College Course 
will take the course in General Chem- 



istry during the second half of the 
school year. "Xewell's Inorganic 
Chemistry for Colleges," will be used 
as a text and his laboratory manual 
as a laboratory hand-book. At the 
opening of school a class in Qualitat- 
ive Chemical Analysis was organized 
to continue throughout the year. This 
last named course may be pursued by 
Juniors and Seniors of the College 
Course who have had the General 
Ingoranic Chemistry. 

Man was primarily created to .;i;b- 
.liie the earth and make himself mas- 
icr of the lower creations by knowing 
thf laws that govern physical phe- 
nomena, and those which explain pres- 
ent environment. Therefore man's 
frst and highest duty is to reach out 
alter truth as found in the Creator as 
well as in His Creation. 

The subjective studies, or that part 
of a man's education which man 
shapes, viz., the linguistic studies, are 
fundamental requisites to successfully 
pursue the objective studies or those 
by which man is shaped, governed 
and controlled. 

It is in these subjects of Chemistry 
and Physics, which are so fundamen- 
tal and yet infinite in scope, that a 
student awakens for the first time to 
the fact that a thorough knowledge 
of the objective studies is an invaluable 
asset to his college education. 



o 



Bible and Religious Work. 
CTOBER 12, at 7.30 P. M. the 
students who are members of 
the Church of the Brethren 
enjoyed a very pleasant annual pas- 
toral visit from Elders S. R. Zug and 
S. H. Hertzler. This fatherly instruc- 
tion was verv beneficial to all. .\fter 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



a hearty hand shake from them every 
one seemed better acquainted and 
more conscious of common interest. 

Our class at 7.30 on Sunday morn- 
inii' is showing interest. Twenty-two 
have enrolled for the work. We are 
finishing the study of the Lord's pray- 
er at present. 

Immediately following this class the 
Sunday School lesson is taught by 
Prof. J. G. Meyer. This class also 
shows good interest. Quite a few of 
our students have connected them 
selves with the organized Sunday 
School Classes in town and are tak- 
ing an active part in these lines also. 

Through the kindness of Mrs. 
Frank \\'. Groff. '04, who has 
opened her home to us, we have been 
enabled to begin our first College Ex- 
tension Bible Work. We are study- 
ing Christ's teaching on Prayer. 
Eight have enrolled for the work and 
we have prospects for others. No 
tuition is cliarged but free will offer- 
ings are received. Mrs. Groff unites 
in extending a hearty welcome to any 
who are inclined towards the work. 
to come and join us in the study of 
God's Book. \\'e meet each Thursday 
at 2.30 P. M. Lvdia Stauf?er. 



Department of German. 

The class in beginning German us- 
es Joyne — Wesselhoeft's German 
Grammar and is in charge of Prof. J. 
S. Harley. The class consists of two 
ladies and one gentleman and is now 
studying declension of adjectives. In 
a few weeks in addition to the gram- 
mar, the class will study Andersen's 
Piilder Buch ohne Bilder and Storm's 
Immensee. The class in second year 
German is taught by President D. C. 
Reber and consists of .five college 
students. The work of this year will 
consist of reading modern prose and 
some classical poetry as well as Ger- 
man prose composition once a week, 
throughout the year. The class has 
already completed Heyse's L. Arrab- 
biata and is now reading Bacon's Im 
\'aterland. The work in German prose 
composition is based on Pope's text 
book. The class has committed to 
memory the poems Lorelei and Die 
Wacht am Rhein. as well as learned 
to sing these and other songs in Ger- 
man. Conversational exercises are 
based on the daily slections which are 
descriptive of German life and cus- 
toms. D. C. REBER. 



OUR COLLEGE TniES 



23 




A Letter to the Editor from Miss 
Emma Miller, '11, states the 
following; — I am now back in 
Chicago and down to hard work. I 
am enjoying my work to the full ex- 
tent although it is a little heavy. For 
my practical work I will have my 
home Bible class again. I know the 
work has proved very helpful to me, 
as it has taken some of the fear out 
of me." 

Miss Olive Alyers writes that her 
school work becomes more pleasant 
every day. With her twenty pupils 
she finds the days passing all too 
quickly. 

We find that many of our Alumni 
are still engaged in study and good 
work, even the they are no longer in 
school. Three of our Alumni, Emma 
M. Cashman, '09, Trostle P. Dick, '08, 
and Maud B. Sprinkle, '08, recently 
graduated in the S. S. Teacher Train- 
ing course at W^a^-nesboro, Pa. 

The friends of G. A. \V. StaufTer, 
'09, will be glad to know that his 
home has been brightened by the birth 
of a baby boy, George Andrew Wash- 
ington Stauflfer, Jr. Is there anything 
in a name? We hope so. 



Misses Grace and Blanche Rowe 
have shown their interest in education 
by the fact that both had been ap- 
pointed to teach schools this 3-ear but 
both resigned to return to Bridge- 
water College to continue their work. 
A very good example. Let others 
follow it. 

We were glad to receive a visit from 
H. L. Smith, "09. a few weeks ago. 

Mr. James Breitigan. '05, accompan- 
ied by his wife and several friends 
lately made a tour of Virginia. West 
X'^irginia and Maryland in an automo- 
bile. 

Prof. J. Z. Herr. '05, is doing good 
work as teacher of the Gleaners' Bible 
Class" in the Elizabethtown Sunday 
School. Lender his direction the class 
has been organized and expects to 
become very active in Christian work. 

Prof. R. W. Schlosser, '11. is becom- 
ing quite popular as a minister and 
Sunday School speaker. Besides his 
regular school work he has preached 
or spoken at Sunday School meetings 
or both for the past six Sundays. 
Come to Elizabethto\vn College if you 
want to learn how to "get busy" and 
keep busy. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Rumor has it that Bruce Rothrock, 
'07. has been married. We have no 
data concerning the event but we ex- 
tend to him our heartiest congratula- 
tions and good wishes. 

The College Library is in receipt 
of two books on mission work in In- 
dia, as a gift from Miss Kathryn Zieg- 
ler, missionary to India, who grad- 
uated from this place in 1908. Gifts 
of this sort are always very much ap- 
preciated by the school. It is a 



Religious Appointments 

Regular Preaching Service : — 

Sept. 10, 7.30 p. m. Sermon by Prof 
J. G. Meyer. Text— John 10:1-20 
Subject — Lessons from Shepherd 
Life. 
Christian Workers" Meeting: — 

Sept. 10, 6.45 p. m. Leader Miss 
Stauffer. 
Prayer Meeting : — 

Sept. 6,— Prof. J. G. Myer. 
Sept. 13,— Leader, B. F. Waltz. 
Sunday Bible Classes: — 
Every Sunday at 8.15 a. m. 
'■Prayer' taught by Miss Stauflfer. 
International S. S. Lessons taught 
by Prof. J. G. Meyer. 
Missionary Reading Circle : — 
Pres.— B. F. Waltz. 
Teacher — Miss Lydia Stauflfer. 
Reading, "The Unfinished Task." 
Regular Preachingi Services : — 

Sept. 17 — Sermon by \'irgil Hol- 
singer. Text, Ps. 1. Subject — 
"The Blessings and Growth of 
the Christian Life." 
Sept. 24, 7.30 ]). m. — Sermon. Dr. 
n. C. Reber. Text. Dan. 1 :8. 
i^ubject^" Lessons from Life of 
Daniel." 



splendid way of showing your inter- 
est in your Alma Mater. 

Reports from Mr. and Mrs. J. F. 
Graybill, '07, say that they are begin- 
ning to feel at home in Sweden and 
like the work much better than they 
expected. It might be interesting to 
state that Rev. Mr. Graybill preached 
a funeral sermon on board the ship. 
One of the passengers died and was 
buried in the sea and Mr. Graybill of- 
ficiated. 



Oct. 1. 10.30 a. m.— Sermon, Eld. S. 
H. Hertzler. Te.xt, Ps. 19:1-6. 
Subject — "God Speaking to Us." 

Oct. 8. 7.30 p. m.— Sermon, R. W. 
Schlosser. Text, Mark 4:28. Sub- 
ject — "The Cost of Salvation." 

Oct. 16, 10.30 a. m. — Sermon, Levi 
Ziegler. Text, Is. 6:1-12. Sub- 
ject — " Call and Answer to Ser- 
vice. " 
Christian Workers Aleetings: — 

Sept. 24. 7.00 p. m. — Leader. Wm. 
K. Kulp. 

(^ct. 8, 7.00 p. m.— Leader, Mary 
-Scheaft'er. 
Mid Week Prayer Meeting: — 

Sept. 27 — Led by Mamie Keller. 

Oct. 4 — Led by Miss Meyer. 

Oct. 11— Led by Calvin Rose. 

Oct. 18— Led by Rhoda Miller. 
Sunday Bible Classes:— 

730 — Christ's Lesson on Prayer- 
Taught by Miss Stauflfer. 

8.15— S. S. Lesson taught by Prof. 
J. G. Meyer. 
Missionary Reading Circle: — 

Every Saturday at 6.30 p. m. 
Reading. "Unfinished Task." — 
Taught by Miss Stauflfer. 

President— B. F. Waltz. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 




..ck^K-.J^-^.-.jX....wI-^...jJw...«.J.*«>».«J««M*^L..w»i«'.vV;,i«T^ 



At this issue of our paper but few 
exchanges have arrived. We reaUze 
that everybody is busy at the open- 
ing of the school year, especially the 
editorial stafif who must necessarily 
make some changes in their paper in 
order to raise the standard over pre- 
vious years. As the delay heigghtens 
the eagerness of subscribers to re- 
ceive the periodical, may it also in- 
crease the excellence of it. 

Ursinus Weekh-. which gives us 
the inside life of a typical college stu- 
dent, again greets us this year. It 
always abounds in notable events of 
school life. 

College Rays has made its appear- 
ance. In the essay "Carthage and 
Rome" the writer shows "what a great 
benediction is has been to all succeed- 
ing generations that Rome won." 

We are glad that we can welcome 
among our number for this year Col- 
lege Folio of Allentown. It anybody 



questions Shakespeare's religion, let 
him read the discussion "Shakespeare 
as a Religious ]\Ian." The "Lives of 
^^'omen in Pennsylvania during the 
Revolutionary \\'ar" portrays some 
noble women who helped in the wor- 
thy cause for which the nation was 
then fighting. 

Just as we go to press the follow- 
ing new exchanges appear: — The Per- 
kiomenite. Normal School Herald, and 
The Carlisle Arrow. We indeed feel 
highly gratified that we can have 
such excellent papers on our list. Sev- 
eral other magazines have promised to 
exchange. This is what The Perkio- 
menite says about Our College Times : 
"I think you deserve congratulations 
for the paper you get out." 

Hospitable Farmer :"Xow stranger, 
sit right down to the table. You are 
welcome to your dinner, but you'll 
have to eat what therest of us do." 



OUR COLLEGE TLAIES 



Stranger : "Thanks, but I — er — if its own nature and know the answer to 
ill the same to you, I'll eat what the humanity's call." College Rays. 



rest of you don't." E.x. 



ISarber: "Would ^•ou like anythi 



Whoso combeth his hair with a view on your face when I've finished?" 

to hide the bald spot, is a prevaricator Victim: "Well, you might leave my 

in his heart. Ex. ncse on if you don't mind." Ex. 

"Do you wonder that the Master .\o. 1. volume 9 of "Our College 

cause to earth to live for man? The Times" has just been issued. It has 

wonder kad been, had he not come been enlarged to 32 pages and cover, 

kni.iwing as he did man's need of his and is otherwise improved. It is a 

revelation. Do you wonder that the credit to the institution in every way 

hero dies for his country, that the and will no doubt meet with a warm 

mother sacrifices her life for the child? welcome from the friends of Elizabeth- 

r.ut read the ileeper meaning of your town College — Elizabethtown Herald. 



50 N. QUEEN ST. 

LANCASTER, PA. 



SILVERWARE oft 



: possible in the Jewelry bu 



St quality at prices most reasonaDle. 
WATCHES. Our ranee in price is from $160 to $1.00. 
CLOCKS. Frcm $300 chime clocks to the alarm clock at 85 cents. 
EYE-GLASSES and SFECIACLES fitted to the eyes with no charge tor examination. 
Our Manufacturing and Repairing Department cannot be excelled in Pennsylvania. Everything is 
done in our own shop, by jur own workmen— You are always welcome at Zook's Jewelry SUre. 

D. Walter Miesse 

The College and School Photographer 

INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP 

PORTRAITS 

Bell Telephone L'HO.l 

24 WEST KING STREET, LANCASTER, PA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 
GEO. R. KERSEY A* i" 



'a"jHl|{IB:ilHi:ii'BI!IIIB'l«;iillli1l:BI 
College Jewtlry o( the Better Sort 



DENTIST 



EMZABETHTOWN, • PENNA. 

TOOTH BRUSHES, FLESH BRUSHES, 
SPONGES, Etc. 

A. W. CAIN 

WE DO IT RIGHT 

Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES iS, SON 
A. R. LEI CHT 

Mannfactnrer of plnB VehiclGS 

Repainting and Rejair Work Given Carelul Attention 
EMZABETHTOWN, PA. 



|G.Wm.REISNER 

i Manufacturing 

i Jeweler 

= Class Pins and Rings Prize Caps 

I Fraternity Jewelry Medals 

I LANCASTER, PA. 

iSlliniBlimillllBIIIIinilinilllBlllilBIIIIBttilBIIIIBIIIIBIIIIBIiiHIIIII 

F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 
GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 

HORSESHOEING A SPECIALTY 
North Marliet Streit. ELIZABETH'OWN, P*. 

J. CROFF & SONS 

Meat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



I LEO KOB I 
Heating and | 

Plumbing | 

? ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. * 

£ * 

»4^^^^ H ^ < ■^^^^^ I ^ » ^^*^^^ ^ ^^*■ ^ *^ 1 ^*^W^*^^■!'»^^»^■» 



FRANK H. KELLER 



Dealer In Fancy and Staple Groceries 
Provisions, Etc. 



Our Highest Ambition to Please You. 



4. Miesse's Ice Cream l 

* t 

* is the most Delicious and Satisfying T 

J thev have eaten. Try it for yourself ^ 

* We serve farties, Weildings. Dinners J 
J and Receptions with cakes and ice cream ^ 
•!• with perfect satisfaction. * 
% D. W. MIESSE, 123 N. Quoen St., Lancaster * 
4. Cur Ice Cream sold in Eiizabethtown by J. C. Gross 4> 



UP TO DATE 

Shaving and Hair Cutting 

R. H. SHISSLER. 



BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO SUPPLIES FOR SALE 
Centre Square 



Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage, 

I J. E. belserI 



For Roofing, Spouting, Tin and 
Granite Ware, Milk Cans, Radi- 
ators, Portable Furnace8,Granite 
Lisli Koasters in four sizes, or 
any special orders in my line. 
Give me a trial. 

Gpp. Ey.change Bank 



« ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

************** **************** 

|o. Zimmerman I 



CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 



Weddings and Parties supplied 
Fancy Cakes at short notice. 



ith 



% S. MARKET ST., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA $ 



First-Class Shoe Rjepairing 

'Work Oiiartu>t««d Prices Reasonable 

RUBBER HEELS make WALKING EASY 
JOHN C. BERBERIAN, E. High St. 



IH, H, BRAND7 



ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 



♦ ElizabotJitovvn, - - Penna. 

* ♦ 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

E. L. RENSEL 

General Blacksinjthing' 

and Repair Work 
Horse-Shoeing a .Specialty. 

Park St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Plain Snits, Ready-Made or Ordered, at 

ADOLPH GANSMAN'S 

Clothier 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange St;., Larcfslir. P 4 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

Dental Parlors 

S. J. HETXDEL. Dentist. 



1912 



Touring Car 

$900.00 
RunabontSSOO 




fully Equipped at Above Prices 
Call on or Address 

S. NEWCOMER, - M T Joy, 



X ELIZABETHTOWX 

I ROLLER MILLS | 



J. F. BIXKLEV, Piopr. « 

; ♦ 

♦ Manufacturer of Best Grades ol ♦ 

♦ FLOUR AND FEED ♦ 

X Highest Cash Prices paid for gra;:j. ^ 

♦ hay and straw * 

♦ ELIZABKTHTOWX, - l'i:.\.\A. « 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦0<>«*v 

5 AND lOc STORE 

Let us nial<e your Nicl<els, l>iuies and 
<2uarters dodoiihlp duty. .Nothing in tlie store 
is priced more than Idc ami from that down. 
M, W. ESHENOWER 



ELIZ.\BETHTO\V.\. 



PEWA. 



John A. Fisher 



BARBER 



Centre Square. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



Chas. R. Boggs, Restaurant 

First-Class c^Meals at All Hours 
Oysters In Season Confectionery, Ice Cream 



i;S. G. HERSHET 

Groceries, Dry 
Goods and 

Notions 

ElilZABETHTOWN. - PENNA. 



JACOB FISHER 

Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Center Square, Elizabethtown, Penna. 

With vou for 31 years. That's All 



For AJl Kinds of 
FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & McBride 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PE» 




Hours 8 to 6 



DK. JEROME G. HESS 
DENTIST 



Hertzler Bldg. 
Elizabethtown Pa. 




WOOD, GRAIN, FEED, FLOUR. 

SEWER PIPE, ETC. ( 



Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. S 






Bell and Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 

East Orange St., Lancaster, Pa 



Ebersole & Baney 

Dealers in 
Choice Groceries, Fine Grade oi Teas and 

Coffees, Fresh Country Butter and Eggs 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Penna 



Grover Hefflefingfer 

Shoes Repaired Shoes Shined 

Hats Cleaned 

S. Market St. ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



CHOICE MEATS 

A. K. Young 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 




For Up-to-Date 

Furnishings 



I. D. 
BENEMAN'S 

Depl. Store 
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GUY COCHNAUER'S 
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Soutli .Market St., Elizabethtowo, I'a. 

CENTRAL MEAT MARKET 

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First Class Automobile Repairing 
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THE DENOMINATIONAL COLLEGE 9 

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AN ALASKAN WINTER TRAIL 12 

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Underwood 

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Elizabkthtown, Pa., December, 1911 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Elizabeth Myer Editor-in-Cbief 

W. K. Gish, '14 School Notes 

Mamie Keller, '12 Society News 

Levi Ziegler, '13 Society News 

\V. F. Esbelman, '12 Exchanges 

Leah M. Sheaffer, '09 Alumni Editor 

Ralph W. Schlosser, '11 Business Manager 

Daisy P. Rider, '10 Art Editor 

Published monthly during the school year. 

This paper will be sent continuously to old subscribers, so as not to break their files, and ar- 
rearages charged, unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration. 
Address all business communications to the Business Manager. 
Terms : 50 cents per year ; single copies, 10 cents. 



n 



B|tl<^/| ^ « >»<^/| » »» W<^/|^|» W^ ft^' l»i^/t y »ii MlVI^ W W Vl ^ * ' »t^/|»» ■ »« Vb* 

IMPORTANT! STUDENTS 
DO YOU KNOW THAT 

XT IS on]j' because of the kind patronage of our business and our profes. 
\t "^ sional men in this town and elsewhere, that this magazine exists. They 

have indeed shown themselves friends of Our College and of " Our Col- 
lege Times." 

Therefore, we justly and fairly may ask you, when about to buy any- 
thing, to consider first those who by their advertising have made this maga- 
zine possible- 

We have solicited only advertisers who are relialile in all respects- 

1 READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS 



BUSINESS MANAGER OF '>OUR COI.IJK3E TIM£S' 



j^ «^K^i«»«<^<Wi»<i«i^i^n*«i» ^ iWi» n ^KW II i ^ W i>««4^ i»«<4^ i» . «4^it» am^lWnf [ 



" Whatever Is-Is Best." 



I know as my life grows older, 

And mine eyes have clearer light, 
That under each rank wrong, some- 
where 

There lies the root of right, 
That each sorrow has its purpose 

By the sorrowing oft unguessed ; 
But as sure as the sun begins morning, 

Whatever is — is best. 

I know that each sinful action. 
As sure as night brings shade. 

Is somewhere, somehow, punished. 
Though the hour is long delayed ; 



I know that the soul is aided 
Sometimes by the hearts unrest. 

And to grow means often to suffer; 
But whatever is — is best. 

I know there is no error 

In the great supernal plan. 
And all things work together 

For the final good of man ; 
I know when my soul speeds onward 

In its grand eternal quest, 
I shall cry as I look back earthward, 

"W'hatever is — is best." 

— Ella Wheeler Wilcox 



My Favorite Book. 



C. J. Rose, '13. 



MY favorite book is the Book 
of all Books. Therein is con- 
tained the Word of God spok- 
en by prophets unto His people. This 
Book is the only book that tells us the 
relation of man with God and his fel- 
low beings. It brought salvation to 
man through the Savior of the world, 
and teaches him how to live a pure, 
simple and devoted Christian life. 

This book condemns the sinful lusts 
of man and asks him to reach out for 
the things that are uplifting. It has 
soothed many a sad heart, and turned 



the minds of men from darkness unto 
marvelous light. It is everlasting, be- 
cause searches can be made for truths, 
but all of them can not be found. 

This Book of God was written with- 
in a period of about four thousand 
years, and has always stood the test 
because of its simplicity and hidden 
truths. Many adversities of life have 
been solved through it, and many peo- 
ple have tried to destroy it and discard 
its teachings, but this great Book has 
alwavs come out victorious. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



The Denominational College. 



Extracts from Address Given by Dr. Henry H. Apple, Pres. of F. & M. 
College, Nov. 13, 1911 



I plead for a period in the life 
of a boy when, after he leaves 
the High School or Academy 
where he has been under strict disci- 
pline, and before he is cast adrift into 
the freedom of life and study in the 
University, he shall be trained in self 
restraint and self control in the cul- 
ture of a College course and under per- 
sonal oversight of sympathetic teach- 
ers. He needs the four years College 
course. I have no sympathy with the 
view that the Academy can do the 
work of the freshman and sophomore, 
and the University the work of the 
Junior and Senior years. To cut out 
the College altogether takes from the 
boy the opportunity which the Col- 
lege alone gives. She stands for dis- 
cipline and drill in thorough scholar- 
ship. Over against the idea of use- 
ful or technical knowledge alone, she 
holds to the necessity of thoroughness 
in all lines of learning. She teaches 
mastery of what is even unpleasant 
and hard, and she clothes scholarship 
with culture. True education draws 
out and developes all the powers of 
personality, and forms the all-rounded 
man. Partial development is guarded 
against, as warped progress is dis- 
couraged. In this utilitarian age it is 
well to conceive of education for its 
own sake. The greater happiness and 
satisfaction of life as the highest use- 
fulness is in the complete development 
of personality. The scholar in but one 



line of learning is an unfortuate pro- 
duction of a true educational system. 
The impartation of knowledge in but 
one line of studies without regard to 
co-ordinate truth, may make the gen- 
ius, but cannot form the full man. Vio- 
lence is done to the possibilities of his 
nature. The grace even of body as 
well as of heart must accompany the 
growth of the mind in the approach 
to the perfect man. The old idea of 
culture as the predominant purpose 
of a college education is not obsolete, 
and its place cannot be taken by meth- 
ods tending to produce efificiency in 
specific lines of training. The zest 
with which students pursue intellec- 
tual work as a rule, will make specific 
training in life practical. This culture 
comes not only from books and lec- 
tures but from the touch of man to 
man. The contact of the student with 
scholarly professors and the personal 
sympathy and guidance of a great 
teacher stands for much in this need- 
ed discipline and training. The best 
sphere is afforded for it in the college. 
I plead no less strongly for the De- 
nominational College. Above all, the 
College aims to form sound Christian 
manhood. The greatest usefulness 
and most effective service is after all 
the product of a trained will. The 
corner stone of modern civilization 
must continue to be reHgion and mor- 
ality. .As the Christian is the highest 
expression of a religious and spiritual 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



being, the College renders incalculable 
service when she educates in the spirit 
of Christ. The hope of the world is 
in tl'.e moral and spiritual uplift of 
her educated men. I am thoroughly 
convinced that there can be no true 
training which overlooks the moral 
side of life, and that the Christian Col- 
lege is therefore the best form of mod- 
ern education. Irrespective of the re- 
lation of a College to a Church in the 
denominational schools or the boasted 
freedom of a State or undenomination 
institution, religion must be accorded 
a place of high regard and serious 
consideration, in the development of 
the student. Without it the noblest 
talents and acquirements may be pros- 
tituted to the basest and most ignoble 
ends. Public virtue and private hap- 
piness are thus endangered in a lack 
of sj'mpathy and an incentive to min- 
ister to the highest good of humanity. 
The interests of learning are identical 
with the best interests of mankind. 
The age of ignorace is the age of op- 
pression and misery. Education with- 
out religion ministers to disorder and 
desolation. The will as well as the 
power to advance life adds charm to 
life, and brings comfort in the true 
philanthropic spirit. It stimulates the 
scientist in his laboratory, the artist 
in his studio, the man of letters in his 
closet, the statesman in his public ca- 
reer. It carries forward the standard 
of truth and marches to victory over 



the enemies of the rights, liberties, 
happiness, and blessedness of man- 
kind. 

The claim of the Denominational 
College stands in ever more direct re- 
lation to the church. If we shall have 
an answer to the call for men for the 
ministry, for missionaries to carry the 
Gospel to the ends of the earth, for 
consecrated laymen devoted to the 
deep interests and welfare of our 
churches, they need to be educated in 
the College whose atmosphere is in 
sympathy with the genius and spirit 
of the church as well as the Gospel. 
Such a College is the handmaiden of 
religion in the regeneration of the 
world. No other four years of life 
give what the student receives in that 
College. He gains some insight into 
liberal learning and some discipline in 
knowledge, some moral training in the 
performance of daily duties, and rever- 
ence for things, social, intellectual and 
spiritual. He comes out a far diflfei- 
ent man than he entered. He becomes 
more tolerant, better balanced, more 
cultivated, more open minded and 
more thoroughly Christian, and thus 
better able to control himself and di- 
rect others, and desirous of rendering 
true service to the church and the 
world. Consecrated wealth of prop- 
erty and life cannot be better used than 
to enable a College to do this glorious 
service of God. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Initiative- Power— Control. 



James H. Breitigan, '05. 



INITIATIVE, Power. Con- 
trol — are the three ruling fac- 
tors in business personality, 
and the greatest of these is Control. 

Initiative, individuality or originality 
are characteristic of all men of pro- 
gress. Men or women possessing these 
qualities have no respect for the old 
simply because it is old; they do not 
copy father, or grandmother, or their 
neighbor. They improve the past in- 
stead of copying it — they do it better. 
Letting well enough alone never 
raised a =alary or declared an extra div- 
idend. What was well enoguh for yes- 
terday is poor enough to-day — do it 
better. 

Do not be afraid to be original. 
Every man and woman is born to do 
a certain work. If he tries to do the 
work of another, he will be a failure. 
"It is ever the man or woman who be- 
lieves in his or her own ideas; who 
can think and act without a crowd to 
back them ; who is not afraid to stand 
alone ; who is bold, original, resource- 
ful ; who has the courage to go where 
others have never been; who does 
what others have never done : it is that 
person who accomplishes things and 
leaves a mark on the times." 

Roosevelt had little use for White 
House precedents or political tradi- 
tions. In every position, whether as 
police commissioner, governor or vice 
president, he always insisted on be- 
ing himself. His remarkable power 
came from being himself. 



Many people never grow all their 
lives because they never are them- 
selves — always some one else. They 
are afraid to take the initiative, and 
thus ruin their capacity for judgment, 
initiative, executive ability and control. 
The world makes way for the man 
with an idea. He is vvanted every- 
where. 

Power. Influence, Character, — Char- 
acter is power in a truer sense than 
knowledge is power, or than money is 
power. The truly great attained to 
the honored positions they held, "not 
by rank, for many were of lowly birth ; 
not by wealth, for the inheritance of 
not a few has been poverty ; not by 
talents, for many were not men of 
genius" ; but by force of character. 
This latter trait has frequently made 
men of moderate powers to surpass 
the brilliant and wealthy. 

Wellington said that Napoleon's 
presence in the French army was 
equivalent to forty thousand soldiers 
— power. 

The personal character of Alexander 
I, Emporer of Russia, was said to be 
equivalent to a constitution — influence. 

Character, not ability, elected Wash- 
ington and Lincoln to the presidency — 
Character. 

"The world is always looking for 
men ; men of character, men who are 
not for sale ; men who are true to the 
core, men of control." 

"I keep my body under, and bring 
it into subjection," St. Paul. 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



It is control over self that keeps the 
judgment keen and the mind undis- 
turbed through the heights of hope and 
lhc cic^ths of discouragement. 

It is control over men that inspires 
all to their best efforts for business ; 
that insures no lack of system, no 
waste of efforts, no neglect of oppor- 
tunity, but accomplishes results. 

Control is the basis of Personal 
Power. 

"Give us men ! 

Strong and stalwart ones! 



Men whom highest hopes inspire, 
^len whom purest honor fires. 
Men who trample self beneath them, 
Men who make their country 
wreathe them 

As her noble sons. 

Worthy of their sires ! 
Men who never shame their mothers 
Men who never fail their brothers. 
True, however false are others : 

Give us men, I say again. 

Give us men." 



An Alaskan Winter Trail. 



W. K. Gish, '04 



Continued from November ] 



When old Dave the keeper of the 
'cabin realized what had happened, he 
said, "Boys this here hain't no wondur 
to me. I knowed Bill ever since them 
early days in the North. I an' him 
was palls down East. He's got a lit- 
tle cabin an' claim here on the creek 
but som' how luck never had nothin' 
good fer him up here, he's los' cour- 
age and took to boose. I've never 
beared him say a pleasin' word fer 
years: no, I'm not wonderin' that he 
done it and I hope the Almighty'll be 
easy on him fer he's had a tough lot — 
well boys, sit up now an' have yer 
meal." 

In the morning we three laid Bill 
away under the snow, and as we gave 
old Dave goodbye and turned to the 
trail, a howling East wind drove 
blinding snow in our faces as if defy- 
ing our strength and courage. At this 
point the trail takes the creek and fol- 



lows it to its source and then crosses 
a mountain range. The storm grew 
stronger as the morning passed by. 
At one place we spent at least half 
an hour trying to pass a bend in the 
stream where the ice was smooth and 
the gale so fierce that it rolled us back 
at each attempt. As a last resort we 
climbed the bank and waded the deep 
snow breaking the cru.st with our arms 
every step of the way. 

We had again returned to the ice 
and were slowly working our way up 
stream when above the noise of the 
wind we heard the yelping of dogs 
and the shouts of a man. We looked 
ahead and could see nothing, but in 
another instant two caribou swung 
around a bend at full speed, retaining 
their footing with difficulty on the 
glare ice. Close behind them came 
the mail team like a bird on the wind. 
The dogs excited and unmanageable 



OUR COLLE'GE TIMES 



13 



paid not the slightest heed to their 
master's command for a halt, and in 
their eager pursuit the possibiHty of 
becoming entangled with their har- 
ness in the antlers of the caribou never 
once occurred to them. The wind had 
blown all the snow from the ice, mak- 
ing the creek a smooth and varnished 
race track of these wilds. Even with 
their sled the dogs had the advantage 
on the ice and were gradually gaining 
on the game but one of them was be- 
ing dragged by the other five and was 
unable to regain his footing at that 
remarkable speed. The driver himself 
clinging to the back of the sled and 
rolling along on the ice first on one 
side then on the other, resembled a 
trailing mail bag perhaps more than 
anything else. But when the caribou 
saw us in their track they turned for 
the bank ; one slipped, staggered a 
few paces and fell with a thud that 
shook our footing. In another instant 
the dogs would be upon him, yet he 
rose in the niche of time and took to 
the deeper snow along the side where 
the team was compelled to stop. He 
ascended the steep bank in leaps and 
when almost at the top an avalanche 
of snow took him again to the ice but 
he was up and away. After exchang- 
ing a few words with the trailing-trail- 
er-of-the-Fairbanks-Limited as he cal- 
led himself, we went our way and 
soon reached the range, but because 
of the low temperature we could not 
camp for the night. 

We crossed these hills with no great 
difficulty but the following day the 
overflows gave considerable trouble 
and we frequently broke through this 
glacial formation. We were compelled 
at times to build a fire and change our 



footwear. That afternoon we stopped 
at a miner's cabin and altho he was not 
about the place we helped ourselves 
to a meal and had a rest. We knew 
that we were welcome to what we 
took because it is the disposition and 
custom of an Alaskan sourdough to 
take a fellow stranger in and share 
with him whatever he may have, even 
though it be his last. 

We rose over the portage that even- 
at sunset. We had no more glaciers 
to contend with and as the trail was 
now easy and well defined we did not 
mind traveling a while during the 
night. But we lingered for some time 
on that elevation, charmed by the 
grandeur of that twilight scene. The 
sun had already dropped below the 
hills but the western sky was all aglow 
with its upshot flames while a narrow 
path of gold glazed the crests of the 
graceful hills along the horizon. Far 
to the left numerous peaks of perpet- 
ual snow still reflected the sun's rays 
like silver shields. But gradually this 
conflagration was quenched by tortur- 
ed twisted rivers of blood. Below us 
lay the valley where the shadows had 
long been gathering and while the 
light was yet lingering on the distant 
hills it was being slowly varied to a 
more pensive glory as it was wedded 
to the gentle soothing twilight of the 
valley, and. as if to add a sacred touch 
the gray vapor of the Hot Springs rose 
over all like burning incense. While 
we looked and wondered my friend 
said, "Pard, I believe with 'Preachin 
Bill' that when God looked on the 
work of His hands and called it good. 
He was looking at this country". 

The next morning we started on 
the most exciting and difficult part of 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



our trip. The day was to be spent in 
crossing the famous Eagle Summit. 
On this mountain the trail is danger- 
ous and deceiving. Five valleys have 
their beginning at its summit and 
more than a few men, losing the sense 
of direction, have descended into one 
of the five that lead astray. The trail 
has been staked part of the way and if 
it were not for those little guides few 
could cross at all. 

We started early in the morning 
and as we went up we stopped here 
and there to view the mountains 
that lay all around us like great bil- 
lows. When far above the timber 
Hne we were overtaken without warn- 
ing by a storm so strong that nothing 
could turn against it, and more than 
that, we could not help being swept 
along with it. At once we realized 
that there was no hope of our safety 
if we parted or if we missed the 
stakes. 

Conversation was almost impossible 
and because of the blinding snow we 
could not see fifteen feet. In a few 
minutes all the snow on the windward 
side of the mountain was carried 
across the peak and deposited on the 
leaward slope and in the valley. 
There was but one thing left for us 
to do — to keep together, and prevent 
our limbs from being broken, if possi- 
ble, while tossed about over those bare 
rocks. We managed to bind ourselves 
together with our parkas, and we clung 
to rocks and stakes as best we could. 
We were tossed about almost like two 
chips, but by keeping together each 
saved the other. Had the wind been 
blowing across the trail we could not 
have saved ourselves. When we reach- 
ed the top we chanced on a sloping 



crust and before we could realize what 
was happening we were sliding down 
and down somewhere into a deep ra- 
vine. We finally found ourselves de- 
posited in a great quantity of loose 
snow and we decided we must ascend 
that slope again if we ever should suc- 
ceed in finding the trail. By punching 
lioles in the crust we actually found 
the stakes above after a long, exhaust- 
ive and anxious effort. We were now 
on the leaward side and out of the 
clutch of the storm. When we reached 
the roadhouse at the foot of the moun- 
•tain we met a few other travelers 
waiting for the storm to subside. We 
were indeed thankful for having 
reached this shelter so fortunately for 
a broken limb would have been death 
itself. From this cabin to Circle is a 
distance of about forty miles across 
a flat open country with few hind- 
rances to fast traveling which justi- 
fied, as we thought, a good long rest 
after our exhaustion. 

As we were preparing to leave this 
place an excited young Indian with 
his fleet team rushed up to the door 
of the cabin to purchase a few sup- 
plies. The dusky maiden in the 
sleigh cast a half pleading look at us, 
as I interpreted it; and seeing that 
they were both from a Tanana tribe, 
and traveling toward Circle, I inquir- 
ed of them their errand. 

By means of a few sentences of 
broken English mixed with their own 
native dialect we understood that this 
couple was one of those romantic and 
dangerous love matches of the dusky 
race. 

It is the custom among many tribes 
for the parents to choose the mate for 
their child which often results in an 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



unhappy union. Sometimes, as in 
this instance, the girl will not con- 
sent to live with the choice of her 
parents but instead will flee from 
camp with her true lover never to 
return. The issue of such a flight is 
sometimes a happy one, j'et a hot pur- 
suit by the rejected lover is almost 
sure to follow, frequently ending in 
a tragedy. 

^^■e at once understood their situ- 
ation and with a hearty grasp of the 
hand my companion and I pledged 
them our best aid in outwitting their 
pursuer. Having given their dogs a 
few minutes to devour their breakfast 
of fish and cornmeal we dashed off to- 
gether ' on our forty mile stretch to 
Circle. A stiff north breeze was toss- 
ing the snow about considerably and 
we were in hopes that our trail might 
be completely blown over before any 
one could trail us. We traveled for 
hours without stopping but we soon 
saw that because of the loose snow 
we could not reach Circle before the 



ne.xt morning. At dusk we built a 
small fire, made a little tea and had a 
short rest. We had no more than 
covered our ashes with snow when 
we heard faintly in the distance the 
yelping of dogs behind us and 
the frequent "Kow How" of their 
master encouraging them to their 
best. Yes, they were trailing us hard 
and fast. At that moment we saw 
but one course to take. Accordingly, 
my partner and I were off at once 
with the team luring our pursuer on 
and on past Nita and Blackfoot ?n 
their hiding, and leaving them to find 
Circle as best they could. Late in 
the night we were overtaken by our 
friend whose bewilderment and dis- 
Receiving from us no satisfaction of 
the whereabouts of the pursued, he 
slowly turned in discouragement to 
resume his search along another trail. 
Today among half a dozen other 
little huts along the upper Yukon 
rapids may be seen the cozy little 
Blackfoot cabin. 




OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




^Hi-HHH 




A merry, merry Christmas ! ! ! 

To our readers, one and all, we ex- 
tend the compliments of the season. A 
Happy Christmas to our widely scat- 
tered College family, to our exchanges, 
and to all other friends. May there be 
a generous infusion of the true Christ- 
mas spirit throughout the world. 

December — the month of the Sav- 
iour's birthday, the time of rejoicing, 
the crown of the year ! 

"Heap on more wood ! — the wind is 

chill; 
But let it whistle as it will, 
We'll keep our Christmas merry still." 
—Sir Walter Scott. 



I 



Joseph Pulitzer. 

N the death of Joseph Pulit- 
zer, editor and manager of 
New York World, which oc- 
curred Sunday, October 29, America 
lost one of her greatest journalists. 

Mr. Pulitzer was born in Buda- 
Pesth, Hungary. April 10. 1847. An 
alien, friendless, and ignorant of the 
English tongue he landed on our 
shores, fifty years ago. On the very 
spot where once stood a hotel in which 



because of his shabby clothes, he was 
denied warmth, and which after a per- 
iod of twenty-two years, he claimed as 
his own property, now stands the great 
"World" building. He began life as a 
poor boy and died a millionaire. Well 
directed nergy and native shrewdness 
were the keynotes of his success. And 
be it said to his enduring credit he 
did not entirely forget the days when 
he was almost a pauper, as is shown, 
by the numerous practical charities 
for which he stood as patron as well 
as founder. In 1909 Mr. Pulitzer an- 
nounced his intention to provide the 
sum of $2,000,000 to establish a School 
of Journalism at Columbia University, 
Xew York, the fund to be available at 
his death. A new building for this 
purpose will be erected at a cost of 

$-=;oo,ooo. 

The attributes that spelled success 
for Joseph Pulitzer should prove an in- 
^iration to every young man who 
reads the story of this great journalist. 

Another Journalist Gone. 

THe following editorial from the 
Lancaster New Era is worthy 
(if notice: "The death of Dr. 
.Mfred C. Lamdin. Editor of the Phila. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



IN 



I'ublic Ledger, removes from the ranks 
of Pennsylvania Journalism one of its 
brighest ornaments, who, at the same 
time, was a sturdy and unflinching 
figure in the battk to maintain the 
standard of the newspaper press at 
that lofty attitude which, in an earlier 
epoch, won for it the somewhat bom- 
bastic designation of "palladium of 
our liberties." Dr. Lambdin, though 
not an old man in the usual accept- 
ation, was a veteran in the field of 
journalism as we now know it, and his 
pen, wielded with consummate grace 
of diction, never faltered in its vigor- 
ous advocacy of what his high intelli- 
gence, keen foresight, admirable judg- 
ment, and indomitable courage con- 
ceived to be the right, any more than 
it lacked trenchant force and splendid 
intrepidity, when brought to bear 
against ends that offended his con- 
science. Withal, his writings ever 
bore the impress of the courteous 
gentleman and chivalric disputant. It 
is to be said to the lasting credit of the 
•knightly journalist, suddenly sum- 
moned to his final account, that his 
voice and pen were invariably lifted 
in behalf of clean, wholesome methods, 
and that he held in abhorrence the 
"yellow" features which have obtained 
in a certain class of the metropolitan 
press and its imitators. Joined to his 
ability in political polemics. Dr. Lam- 
din was gifted with an artistic sense 
that was mirrored in his literary 
essays, his dramatic and musical criti- 
cisms, and in every department of 
the profession which he adorned." 

Bible Term 

The Annual Spiritual Feast at Eliz- 



abethtown College in the form of the 
Bible Term is being prepared and 
herewith a preliminary announcement 
of the same is made. The time has 
been set' for it to begin on January 11, 
1912, and to close on January 21. A 
large variety of subjects will be taught 
which will be of interest to all Sunday 
School and church workers, and es- 
pecially to ministers of the Gospel. 
The instructors will consist of several 
members of ilie Faculty, several trus- 
tees, and two special teachers of 
national reputation in the Church of 
the Brethren. The special teachers 
are Elder Galen B. Royer. of Elgin, 
Illinois, and Elder J. Kurtz Miller, of 
i'rooklyn, New York. Brother Miller 
will teach two periods a day. one being 
devoted to a study of John's Epistles, 
and the other to a consideration of 
messages from great chapters of the 
Bible. Brother Royer will teach also 
two periods each day presenting the 
office and work of the Holy Spirit and 
Parables oi our Lord. Brother Royer 
^vill preach evangelistic sermons each 
evening during the entire term. 

Elder Jesse Ziegler. President of the 
Board of Trustees, wil! give several 
lessons on Prayer Broihcr J. K. Kel- 
ler, also a Trustes, will teach several 
days on a theme to be announced later. 
Elder S. H. Hertzle.- will continue his 
instruction from the Book of Romans. 
Prof. H. K. Ober will present the sub- 
ject of S.inday School Per'agogy. Sis- 
ter Lydia Stauffer the regular Bible 
teacher of the school. \%iil give instruc- 
tion along some line to be tnnounced 
later. Sister Kathryn Miller, the Vo- 
ral Music teacher ci the College, will 
give daily instruction in the art of 
singing. 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



In addition to thi^ varied 4< ly pro- 
gram, a few special features will oc- 
cur throughout the term in the form 
of special programs. On Sa'.urday, 
January 13th the Educational pro- 
gram will be renedered. On January 
14th, the Sunday School Program; 
on Saturday, January 20, the Mis- 
sionary and Temperance (Program. 
The special prog-ams together with 
the schedule of daily work of Ihe teach- 
ers of the Bible term, will be an- 
nounced in the January issue of Our 
College Times. A special circular will 
be ready in December giving full par- 
ticulars and will be mailed to all ap- 
plying for it. Tuition will be free to 
all those lodging at the College. A 
contribution toward the defraying of 
the expenses of the special Bible teach 
ers will be solicited from all who at- 
tend, and especially from those who 
do not lodge at the College. The ex- 
penses for those boarding and lodging 
at the College will be five dollars for 
the ten days. Single meals may be had 
at the College dining-room at twenty 
cents, and a single night's lodging at 
fifteen cents. 

Let all reading this announcement 
consider themselves invited to be 
present the entire session and urged 
to speak to some friend who may not 
know of these splendid advantages to 
learn more about God's word. Altho 
the Bible Term is a common feature, 
let it be remembered that there will 
be many new things presented and 
many old things in a new and interest- 
ing way. Remember that the Bible 
Term occurs in January again, and 
that you arrange to come at least a 
few days if you are prevented from at- 
tendance at the entire session. Ask 



for the special Bible Term circular. 

China 

The eyes of all civilized nations are 
turned upon China. Confucianism and 
superstition must fall when confront- 
ed by intelligence and Christianity. 
God is in history overruling the des- 
tiny of nations. 

College Heights. 

The Alwine farm lying south of the 
College was bought a few years ago 
by the Buch-Hoffman Company, of 
Elizabethtown. This tract of 84 
acres, now known as Beautiful College 
Heights, has been surveyed by Prof. 
H. K. Ober and laid out into building 
lots, seventy-five of which were put on 
sale Nov. 4th, by the College Heights 
Development Company whose gener- 
al office is at 55 North Queen St., Lan- 
caster, Pa. 

Orange Street, along which many 
of these lots are located, now runs par- 
allel with College Ave. and it is sup- 
posed by some that it will in the fu- 
ture become the main thoroughfare 
to the College, as there are cement 
walks being laid from the street car 
tracks to the College Campus. 

The Lancaster Examiner of Nov. 16 
reports twenty-four lots already sold 
and says that contracts are already be- 
ing let for twelve buildings to be erect- 
ed in the Spring. 

The circular printed to advertise 
these lots contained the following: — 

"Elizabethtown College is located 
on a beautiful eminence, surrounded 
by charming landscapes and hills, and 
the College is recognized as a very fine 
institution, teaching all the necessary 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



branches to fit students for professions 
business, music, etc., and persons who 
have young men and women to edu- 
cate should be interested in this Col- 
lege Heights tract, so they can build 
and live near this institution. 

A Good Position 

We neglected in our former issues 
to report that Mr. Andrew Henry who 
was a student here last year, was ap- 
pointed post-master at Hershey, Pa., 
on Sept. 11th. About three hundred 
pieces of mail matter are daily sent 
out from this office. We wish abund- 
ant success to Mr. Henry in his new 
field of labor, and thank him for the 
copies of the "Hershey Press" which 
he sends to us weekly. 



Thanks! 

The College expresses thanks to our 
friends from town, Mrs. H. K. Ober, 
Mrs. Jos. Heisey, Mrs. Lizzie Brill, 
Misses Anna Hostetter and Lizzie 
Zug for their services in helping to 
pare fruit for canning this fall. 

Our famous groceryman, Oliver 
Heisey and wife, Elizabeth Lewis Hei- 
sey are the proud parents of a four 
months old baby boy whose name is 
Abram Lewis Heisey. We meant to 
publish this fact among our School 
News items earlier, but carried it on 
the inside lid of a check-book until 
reminded of it a short time ago. 




'a'a'a.^A.'aTa A A i 



H 



chooljxote: 





iA 



IT is no exaggeration to say 
that during no previous Fall 
term have the students on Col- 
lege Hill been quite so busy as at pres- 
ent. There are so many extra lectures 
and meetings of various kinds that de- 
mand a certain amount of the students' 
attention, yet we believe that all are 
being benefitted by them, because of 
the inspiration received. 



On Oct. 30, Galen B. Royer, Secre- 
tary of the Foreign Mission Board of 
the Brethren, gave a very stirring ad- 
dress on "Mission Work in China and 
India." J. M. Blough of India, spoke 
to us on the same theme, on the night 
of Nov. 6. He spent a number of 
years in the work and will return in 
a few weeks. Both these men made 
plain to us the great need and prob- 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



lems of workers in those lands. 

Many of the teachers and students 
attended the love feast in the town 
church, Nov. 2nd and 3rd. Some 
heard the lecture on Martin Luther, 
given in the Lutheran Church by Dr. 
F. A. Holtzhausen. 

The boarding students spent an hour 
very pleasantly on Hallowe'en, in the 
College kitchen and dining-hall, pull- 
ing taffy and engaging in a few short 
and appropriate pastimes. 

We were all pleased to have Dr. 
Apple, president of Franklin and Mar- 
shall College, address us the night of 
\'ov. 13, the occasion being the An- 
niversary of the Founding of the Col- 
lege. 

Many of the gentlemen students 
heard the very excellent lecture given 
in the High School-room in town, Nov. 
15, by Mr. Roberts, National Secretary 
of the Y. M. C. A. 

Not a few of our number attended 
Teachers' Institute held at Lancaster, 

from Nov. 13th to 17th. 

Some of our teachers are still lectur- 
ing in the interests of the Anti-Saloon 
League. 

Among those of our number who 
took an active part in the Ministerial 
Meeting at Petersburg, on Nov. 8 and 
9th were, — Dr, Reber, Miss Stauflfer, 
Miss Myer and Mr. Ziegler. 

Mr. Levi Ziegler was recently called 
to Harrisburg to deliver a few ser- 
mons in the Brethren Church. 



Basket ball is the great recreation at 
present for the College boys. Sharp 
games are frequently played between 
Alpha and Memorial Halls and be- 
tween day and boarding students. 

Homerian News 

THE Homerian Literary Socie- 
ty has decided to render a pub- 
lic program every four weeks. 
Since Friday evening is the most suit- 
able time for such a program and since 
the Keystone Literary Society has al- 
ways held a meeting on each Friday 
evening, it was necessary for the two 
societies to have an agreement con- 
cerning the time for holding public 
meetings. The Keystone Society 
agreed to give one Friday evening out 
of every four to the Homerian Society, 
and on that evening to hold their 
meeting privately and at such an hour 
as will not conflict with the Homerian 
meeting. 

A public program was renedered by 
the Homerians on Friday evening, 
Nov. Uth. The devotional feature was 
conducted by the chaplain. Prof. H. K. 
Ober, who read a very short but fitting 
scripture, and offered a fitting prayer. 
The first musical number was a vocal 
duet entitled "Sunset." sung by Misses 
Leah SheafFer and Kathryn Miller. 
Miss Minerva StaufFer then in her 
charming manner recited "One of 
Bob's Tramps." 

The question. Resolved, That Uni- 
versal Peace should be established, 
was debated affirmatively by Jacob E 
Myers and W. K. Gish ; and negatively 
by H. K. Eby and L. W. Leiter. After 
the debate, a male quartet sang a ger- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



man song called "Du du liegst mir im 
Herzen." The next number was an 
oration, "The Universal Language," 
by Miss Leah Shaeffer. The last fea- 
ture of music, "The Bells of St. 
Mary's," a vocal solo by Miss Kathryn 
Miller, proved a most appropriate close 
to the excellent exercises of the even- 
ing. 

The critic. Dr. D. C| Reber, was 
wise, witty, and whetting in his re- 
marks. 

The executive officers elected and in- 
stalled for the next eight weeks are, — 

Speaker, B. F. Waltz; Vice Presi- 
•dent, Laban W. Leiter ; Monitor, W. 
K. Gish ; Secretary, Mamie B. Keller; 
Chaplain. Prof. H. K. Ober; Critic, Dr. 
D. C. Reber. The term officers are, — 
Librarian, Jacob E. Myers; Reviewers, 
Profs. J. G. Meyer and R. W. Schlos- 
ser. There is also one year officer, — 
Treasurer, H. K. Eby. 



Keystone Literary Society Notes 

ON Oct. 20, the new officers of 
the K. L. S. were inaugurated 
The Pres., Mr. Holsinger, gave 
his inaugural address having for his 
subject, "Success in One's Calling." 
Mr. C. L. Martin made an extempore 
speech on "The Educational Value of 
Lectures." Miss Viola Withers, a 
former student here, now a student of 
music in Phila., gave to the Society 
«ome excellent music which was. much 
appreciated. 

On Oct. 27, the "College Hill Quar- 



tet" appeared for the first time in pub- 
lic and sang. "The Feller on My Knee." 
At this meeting Geo. C. Neflf gave a 
select reading; Orpha Harshberger 
read a splendid essay on "Character"; 
Elsie Adams discussed "The Iron Sup- 
ply of the World and its Influence upon 
Civilization"; Gertrude Miller gave a 
recitation entitled "Old October." 

On Nov. 3, an Evangeline program 
was rendered. The entire poem was 
recited by eleven persons. It was the 
first of its kind ever given by the Key- 
stoners and it is under just such tests 
that the great talent of the Society 
becomes evident. The program was 
interspersed with appropriate music. 
"Coming O'er the Sea," was sung by 
the Quartette. 

At a previous meeting the Homer- 
ians were granted the request to have 
one Friday evening out of every four 
to hold a public meeting, necessarily 
shortening the time for the program of 
the Keystone Society. The literary 
part of the program for Nov. 10, was 
therefore omitted. The program con- 
sisted of business and parliamentary 
drill, it being the last evening of Mr. 
Holsinger's administration. 

A considerable amount of business 
is being transacted at our executive 
sessions. The Society is making a 
strong effort to improve the Constitu- 
tion so as to meet our growing needs. 

The new officers are, — President, J. 
D. Reber; Vice President, R. C. Long; 
Secretary, Irene Sheetz; Critic, Levi 
K. Ziegler; Editor. Wm. Kulp. 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




«/ tew*-. J»^^»«*i -*•'•'!*'•■•" ■•■•'I J***'"' J* ■»**'«wi^^ 



THE exchange editor has been 
real busy reading the differ- 
ent exchanges which have come 
in during the month. We extend the 
hand of welcome to all of them and 
would say, "If you do not see a com- 
ment on your paper in this issue, 
watch the exchange department of fu- 
ture issues of this paper." 

The symposium, "Fifty Years of a 
Great Republic" in Normal Vidette," 
rings with patriotism for our glorious 
fatherland. It deals with the history 
and prosperity of the youngest nation 
on the globe. 

"Purple and White" comes to us 
with a new cover and greatly improv- 
ed. Its pages contain good up-to-date 
orations on economic problems con- 
fronting the American people. These 
issues must be solved in the future by 



the students now in college. 

"Delaware College Review" should 
select advertisements appropriate for a 
College paper. The mechanical part of 
the magazine is of good material and 
the cuts give it an artistic finish. 

The discussion on "Dickens' Christ- 
mas Books" in "Mercury" names the 
different characters in the novelist's 
pathetic works. The writer gives some 
characteristics of Dickens that made 
him the much appreciated author. "I 
am the Man" recounts some of the 
world's heroes that were notable in a 
certain ambition, and concludes with 
the Nazarene as supreme in all traits. 

"Wealth vs. the Commonwealth" in 
AVestern Maryland College Monthly 
states that we have not yet attained 
the true democracy. A comparison is 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



made with the English Courts and the 
American Courts showing that justice 
is meted out immediately by the for- 
mer. The writer urges the necessity 
of education to help men to stand 
against the bosses and scorn their 
bribes. 

"An education renders a man not 
only better prepared to wrestle with 
the difficulties that may confront him, 
but it gives him a fuller appreciation 
of life. What beauty can the business 
man derive from an elegant painting 
or an inspiring Hterary or dramatic 
production, unless his tastes have been 
cultivated?" 

— College Student. 

"Congress has been most shameful- 
ly indifferent to education. Almost ev- 
ery other interest of the people is 
treated generously. Yet we hope a 
brighter day will come when money 
shall be appropriated for schools more 
generously than for battleships, and 
when a secretary of education shall be 
accorded as much honor as the secre- 
tary of war." — Normal Vidette. 

Rebecca: "Abraham, your fire in- 
surance runs out on Wednesday." 

Abraham : "Never you mind, the 
firemen run out tomorrow." — Ex. 

"Not like Caesar stained with blood. 
But like Washington great and good 
Not like Arnold paid in gold 
But like Hamilton of worth untold. 
Not like Nero besmearched with 

mur. 
But like Jackson knelt in prayer. 
More like Lincoln in victory, 
More like Christ in Galilee. 



Let these be mottoes then. 
For every woman and every man. 
Till from here below we pass. 
Far more durable than brass." 

— Purple and White. 

"Backward, turn backward, O Time 
in your flight, and give us a maiden 
dressed proper and right. We are so 
weary of switches and rats, Billy 
Burke clusters and peach basket hats. 
\\'ads of jute hair in a horrible pile 
stacked on their heads to the height 
of a mile. Something is wrong with 
the maidens we fear ! Give us the girls 
as they used to appear. Give us the 
girlies we once knew of yore, whose 
curls didn't come from a hairdressing 
store. Maidens who dressed with a 
sensible view. And just as Dame Na- 
ture intended them to. Give us the 
girl with her figure her own and fash- 
ioned divinely by nature alone. Fem- 
inine style's getting fiercer each year 
— oh, give us the girls as they used 
to appear." — Red and Black. 

"But what we need today are con- 
sciences which will not only refrain us 
from being contaminated, but which 
will compel us to attack evil wher- 
ever it exists. There are enough hon- 
est, good-intentioned, sober-minded 
citizens in this land to make it a per- 
fect L'topia. But unless their con- 
science prods them on to a fuller real- 
ization of governmental duties devolv- 
ing upon them, the on-coming gener- 
ations must justly render the verdict 
pronouncing them as guilty as those 
who were corrupt." — College Student 

We gratefully acknowledge the fol- 
lowing exchanges: Dickensonian. Tar- 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



gum, Carlisle Arrow, Perkiomenite, 
Lordsburg C'^llege Educator, High 
School Review, Western Maryland 
College Monthly, Albrigh Bulletin, 
Purple and White, The Rer Man, Pur- 
ple and Gold, College Ri s, M. H. 
Aerolitii, Normal Scl^'"'^- '^'^'rald. Sig- 
nal, The Collegian, jeiaw*re College 



Review, Philomathean i.,U ".♦hly, Rays 
of Light, College Student, Manchester 
College Bulletin, The Gettysburgian, 
College Folio, Normal Vidette, Linden 
Hall Echo, Mercury, Red and Black, 
The Berean Worker, Ursinus Weekly, 
and Friendship Banner. 



Snowflakes on the night of Nov. 14. 

Miss Ruth Erb and Louise Mathias 
enjoyed the Institute address and sour 
crout lunch at Lancaster on Nov. 14. 

Miss Xora Reber and her friends 
took dinner at the famous Nissley 
luch rooms on Chestnut Street. 

"The shops are closed, the bells ring 
out, 
The holly gleams thru every pane ; 
Each house-wife plies a busy task- 



'Tis happy Christmas Time again." 

Don't forget the Bible Term. It be- 
gins January 11, 1912 and continues 
ten days. Elder Galen B. Royer and 
Elder J. Kurtz Miller will be the spe- 
cial teachers. 

A postal card with your address on 
the back, sent to Dr. D. C. Reber will 
bring you our College catalogue. 

Do you want to fit yourself for 
teaching? Write to us for a catologue 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 




Enoch R. Madeira, '09, has recently 
returned from Canada, where he was 
studying the bee industry. He is the 
first of our graduates to become an 
apiarist. 

Enos Prey, '10, has been elected 
bookkeeper for the A. S. Staufifer Coal 
and Feed establishment at Palmyra. 

The West again claims one of our 
graduates in the person of E. Roy 
Engle, '06, who is now at Raisin, Cal- 
ifornia, where he and Willis Heisey are 
farming the land owned by Joseph G. 
Heisey and S. P. Engle of Elizabeth- 
town. 

The College was indeed glad to re- 
ceive a visit from Miss Agnes Ryan on 
Friday, Oct. 27, to Oct. 29. These vis- 
its come seldom, but are much appre- 
ciated as are all visits from Alumni and 
and old students. 

A letter from Amos P. Geib, '09, 



who is now studying at Dr. White's 
Bible School in New York, says, "I 
like my work at the mission and the 
B. T. T. S. I think, often, of the val- 
uable discipline received during Col- 
lege days and trust I may always cher- 
ish reminiscences of the same." 

Miss Emma Cashman, '09, informs 
us that she is assistant teacher in the 
Music Department of Bridgewater 
College. Elizabethtown is surely well 
represented among the different 
schools of the Brotherhood and others : 
Miss Jennie Miller, '09, at Nokesville; 
Miss Gertrude Hess, '11, at Union 
Bridge ; Miss Cashman, '09. at Bridge- 
water; L E. Oberholtzer. '06, at Dale- 
ville : L Z. Hackman, '07, at the Phila- 
delphia Business College ; Luella G. 
Fogelsanger. '06, at Holyoke Business 
Institute, Mass. ; H. L. Smith, '09, at 
Messiah Bible School. Grantham ; be- 
sides four Alumni at their Alma Mater. 
.-Ml this shows that Elizabethtown Col- 
lege graduates are in demand. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Religious Appointments 

Regular Preaching Services: — 

Oct. 22, 7.30 p. m.— Sermon by Bro. 

John Zug. 
Nov. S, 7.30 p. m. — Sermon by Bro. 

Charles Madeira. Text, Luke 15: 

18. Subject — Lessons from the 

Prodigal Son. 
Nov. 12, 10.30 a. m. — Sermon Bro. 

Harry Mohler. Text, Jas. 3:5, 6. 

Subject — The Controlled Temper. 
Christian Workers' Meeting: — 

Oct 22, 6.30 p. m. — Leader, Miss 

Leah Sheaffer. 
Nov. 5, 6.30 p. m. — Leader, Charles 



E. Resser. 
Prayer Meeting: — 
Oct. 25— Led by Calvin Rose. 
Nov. 1 — Led by Miss Stauffer. 
Nov. 8 — Led by Gertrude Miller. 
Nov. 15 — Led by Levi Zeigler. 
Sunday Bible Classes: — 

7.30 a. m.— "Prayer," taught by Miss 

Stauffer. 
8:15 — S. S. Lesson, taught by Prof. 
J. G. Meyer. 

Missionary Reading Circle: — 
Saturday, 6.30 p. m. 

President— B. F. Waltz. 
Teacher — Lydia Stauffer. 
Reading— "The Unfinished Task." 



# 



50 N. QUEEN ST. 



: possible in the Jewelry business. 



LANCASTER, PA. 

Our new and larger store enables us to give you th- best serv-i 
SILVERWARE of the very best quality at prices most reasonau.e. 
WATCH ES. Our ranee in price is from $150 to $1.00. 
CLOCKS. From $300 chime clocks to the alarm clock at 85 cents. 
EYE-GLASSES and SPECTACLES fitted to the eyes with no charge for examination. 
Our Manufacturing and Repairing Department cannot be excelled in Pennsylvania. Everything is 
done in our own shop, by -jur own workmen — You are always welcome at Zook's Jewelry Stere. 

D. Walter Miesse 

The College and School Photographer 

INDIVIDUAL AND CROUP 

PORTRAITS 



Bell Telephone 290J 

24 WEST KING STREET, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writir 



GEO. R. KERSEY A# 



DENTIST 



ElilZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

TOOTH BRUSHES, FLESH BRUSHES, 
SPONGES, Etc. 

A. W. CAIN 



•W^ DO IT RIGHT. 



Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES CSi. SON 
A. R. LEI CHT 

Jfannfactnrer ol FlnB VehlclCS 

Repainting and Repair Work Given Careful Attantion 
EUZABETHTOWN, PA. 



> ♦♦ » # ♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦ * * ♦ * l "H"l" l " l "H"H"I ' 

LEO KOB 

: Heating and 

Plumbing 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

* ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ ♦♦ » ♦♦♦♦ » ■ > ♦ < ■ ■ H"l"l " H"l ' 



FRANK H. KELLER 

Dealer in Fancy and Staple Groceries 
Provisions, Etc. 



Our HIghist Ambition to Please You. 



BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO SUPPLIES FOR SALB 

Centre Square 



.iijpiiiiiaiiiiiBniai''.iaiiiiiBiiiiflii«iiiiiiiinHiiiiniiiifli>!iia';iii:,iiB|i 

g College Jawelry ot the Better Sort ■ 

Ig.wiiiTreisnerI 

I Manufacturing | 

I Jeweler | 

s Class Pins and Rings Prize Cnps ■ 

i Fraternity Jewelry Medals | 

1 LANCASTER, PA. | 

Siiiiiia ■iiiaiiiiiBiiiH ■iiiiaiiiiiBi!iiaiiiiiBiiiiaiiiiiHiiiiaiiiiirfr 

F. DISSINGER and H. H. CARMAN 
GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 

HORSESHOEING A SPECIALTY 
North Market Street. ELIZABETH OWN. PA. 

J. CROFF & SONS 

Meat Marlcet 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



, . <„iMi I i ii n .. t* . m | . n ..t. n . » <.. i .»»* » »»» j 

I Thote who are judges ol good Ice Cream say that 

: Miesse's Ice Cream 

is the most Delioiona and Satisfying 
they have eaten. Try it for yourself 

We serve Parties, Weddings, Dinners 
and Receptions with cakes and ice cream 
with perfect satisfaction. 

0. W. MIESSE, 123 N. Queen St.. Lancaster 

Our Ice Cream sold in Elizatiethlown b) I. C. Gross 

i- l" l " l "l"H" l " >- H"l"> - l"M" »- H"H - 4"l"l"H"l"H . » 



UP TO DATE 

Shaving and Hair Cutting 

R. B. SBISSLER. 

Ctias. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Careiolly Compounded 



28 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



I/. E. BELSERl 

2 For Rooting, Spouting, Tin and ^ 

£ Granite Ware, MilfCans, Radi- i^ 

J ators. Portable Furnaces.Uranite ^ 

$ Lisk Roasters in four sizes, or ^ 

^ any special orders in tny^iine. ^ 

$ Give me a trial. ' ' * 

^ Opp. Exchange Bank ^ 

f ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. * 



* ***4Mk* ******* **************** 

I O. Zimmerman | 

1 CHOICE BREAD AND * 

* CAKES I 

2 Weddings and Parties supplied with # 
^ Fancy Cakes at short notice. » 

1 t 

2 S. MARKET ST., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA $ 

« % 



First-Class Shoe Rjepairing 

Work Guaranteed Prices Reasonable 

RUBBER HEELS make WALKING EASY 

JOHN C. BERBERIAN, E. High St 

\H. H. BRANDrl 

A Dealer in * 

J ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 

♦ SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 

♦ 

J Elizabothtown, 



Penna. J 



E. L. RENSEL 

General Blacksuiithin? 

and Repair Work 
Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

Park St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Plain Snits, Ready-Made or Ordered, at 

ADOLPH GANSMAN'S 

Clothier 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orangs Sh., Lancaster, Pa 
ELIZABETHTOWN 

Dental Parlors 

S. J. HEINDEL, Dentist. 



1912 



Touring Car 
89OO.00 
boutSSOO 




Fully Equipped at Above Prices 
Call on or Address 



I ELIZABETHTOWN 

t ROLLER mills! 

♦ J. F. BINKLEI-, Propr. X 

J Manufacturer of Best Grades f>t ♦ 
J FLOUR AND FEED ♦ 

« Highest Cash Prices paid for grain, i 

♦ bay and straw ^ 

♦ ELIZABETH 1X)WX, - I'EXN.A. t 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦ 

5 AND lOc STORE 

Let us make your Nickels. Dimes and 
Quarters do double duty. Nothing in the store 
is priced more than lOc and from that down. 

M. W. ESHENOWER 
ELIZ.4BETHTOW.\, - PENXA. 

John A. Fisher 



BARBER 



H. S. NEWCOMER, 



Mt. Joy, Pa. Centre Sqr 



Elizabethtown. Pa 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



Chas. R. Boggs, Restaurant 



First-Class cTVIeals at All Hours 



Oysters In Season 



Confectionery-, Ice Cream 



S. G. HERSHEyI 

Groceries, Dry ♦ 

Goods and ♦ 

Notions ♦ 

EMZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. f 



JACOB FISHER 

Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Center Square, Elizabethtown, Penna. 

With you for 81 years. That's All 

E. H. LEHMAN 
COAL 

WOOD, GRAIN, PEED, FLOUR. 

SEWER^PIPE, ETC. 

Telephone 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Bell ami Ind. Phones 
t The Lancaster Mail Order House 

* Dealers in 

■'Hew and Old Books 
East Orange St., liancaster, Pa 

CHOICE MEATS 

A. K. Young 

EIrlZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



For AH Kinds of 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & McBride 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



DR. JEROME G. HESS 
DENTIST 



Hertzler Bldg. 
Elizabethtown Pa. 




Ebersole & Baney 

Dealers in 
Choice Groceries, Fine Grade of Teas and 

Coffees, Fresh Country Bntter and Eggs 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Penna 




Grover HefBefingen 

Shoes Repaired Shoes Shined 

Hats Cleaned 

S. Market St. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



For Up-to-Date 

Furnishings 



Men, Women 

and Children 



I. D. 
BENEMAN'S 

Depl. Store 
MT. JOY, - PA. 




30 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of lour Patronage. 



THE ''ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD" 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year Sample Copies Free 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



H K. OBER 

Notary Public 

Surveyor and Conveyancer 
Ellzabethtown, - - Penna. 



CUY COCHNAUER'S 

Up-to-Date Shaving Parlor 

!^outh .Market St., Ellzabethtown, Pa. 



Poorman's Bakery 

Choice Bread, Rolls & Cakes 

HUMMELSTOWN ST, 




S. B. KIEFER 

Notary Public 

Insurance, Keal Estate and Collections 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PEN! 



Bay The Famous 



CENTRAL MEAT 



MARKET 



All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



Overland Automobile 

/ First Class Automobile Repairing j 
< A Complete Line of Sporting Goods ) 



GEO. A. FISHER 

e:lizabethtowx, - penna. 



H. H. GOOD 



ELIZABETHTOWN 



p [MPI [ Dry Goods, Notions, Foot- 



S. Market & Bainbridee Sts. 
XLIZABETHTOWN. • PA. 



Wear, Carpets, Linoleums 
and Oil Cloths 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



♦♦♦ ♦ ♦♦♦ ♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ ♦ <"I"I"I"I -* * * I"I* 



'Breitigan's Regal Strain" 



I Silver Plymouth Rocks I: 



The foundation to succoss lies in the getting ol the 
right start. You can get the right start in Silver Ply- 
mouth Rocks by getting a setting of eggs, a pair, trio 
or pen from my Hagerstown. Md .. Philadelphia, Nor- 
ristown. Columbia. Lebanon and Lititz Prize-winners 

The Silver Plymouth Rocks retain the utility quali- 
ties of their cousins, the Barred Plymouth Rocks, and 
have the extremely beautiful Plumage of the Dark 
Brahma, a silvery white on a solid black Write for 
circular and prices. 



James H. Breitigan 



UTITZ, PENNA. 



^i' m '' i"i"H"H"i"H"i"H"H"i"i"i"i"r ' i ' H"i"H"< 



D. C. BRINSER 



Coal 



Grain, Flour, Feed, 
Seeds, Hay, Straw 
and Fertilizer. 




Bell & Ind. Phones 

Rheems, - - Pa. 



5 The latest current events ^ 

S For Ladies and Gents, ^ 

.!j^ Who always are looking ^ 

S For good country cooking. S 

5 AT NISSLEY'S $ 

2 LUNCH AND DINING ROOMS t 

£ 14-16 B. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa S 



WE ARE AFTER 

cTVlR. cTVlAN 

We want you for a customer, 8o we 

tempt you with a store full of uncommon ♦ 

values. Come and see them. Sooner * 

or later you are going to find out the ♦ 

advantage of quality, service and price, ♦ 

to be obtained here. The sooner you X 

(io it the better it will be for you. J 




t^ 




^y 



Our customers are all pleased custom- 
ers, because we really stand back of 
everything we sell. 



MARTIN 

Clothier and Furnisher 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PKNNA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



ItHE ^ BOOK ^ STORE I 



Books, Stationery, School 

Supplies and Post 

Cards 



Q 



Sunday School Supplies 

and Mottoes 

Mail Orders Solicited 



I C. rj. FALKENSTEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. I 







ipaintiiiG anb IPaper 
Ibanging 

AMOS B. DRACE 

J. M. BENNER 

FREIGHT, BAGGAGE and EXPRESS 
Furniture, Pianos, Machinery 

PLATE GLASS A SPECIALTY. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 


^ S. G. GRAYBILL 
College Hill Dairy 

Fresh milk and cream daily. All milk 
tested forchildren; free from tuberculosis 

HOTELS mND families SUPPLIED 




c^. W MARTIN 

COAL, WOOD. GRAIN 
FLOUR and FEED 

Telephone 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 


TAKE YOURj 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday morning. 
Returns Wednesday and Friday afternoon. 

J. RALPH GROSS 


H THE BARBER jj 


ELIZ \BETHTO\V\ - PENN.A. 







O. N. HEISEY 



;$ Provisions, Groceries, CS, Choice Candies ^ 

■^ HEISEY BUILDING ELIZABETHTOWN. - PENNA. fc 



&C ^ n-t t nt #. 




THE ETHICAL FUNCTION OF THE SCHOOL 8 

THE CLEVER THIEF 11 

EDITORIALS 13 

PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE 14 

NATIONAL BLESSINGS 14 

BIBLE TERM FOR 191 2 16 

SCHOOL NOTES.... 18 

KEYSTONE LITERARY SOCIETY NOTES 19 

DEPARTMENT WORK 20 

BIBLE AND RELIGIOUS NOTES 20 

THANKSGIVING VACATION 22 

RELIGIOUS APPOINTMENTS 22 

EXCHANGES. . 23 

ALUMNI 25 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



EVERYBODY'S STORE 



ELIZABETHTOWN 
PBNNA. 



Your needs supplied at 
satisfactory prices in Dry 
Goods, Groceries, Keady- 
to-VVear Clothing for Men 
and Women of all ages. 
Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oil- 
Cloth, Shoes, Etc. 

Polite attention. 
Square dealing. 
■Guaranteed satisfaction. 




Agents for Made-to- 
measure 

CLOTHING 

International Tailoring Co. 
New York 

Star Tailoring Co. 

Chicago. 

American Ladies Tailoring Co. 

Chicago 

Up-to-Date Sample* 

On Hand 



>IERTZLER BROTHERS AND COMPANY 



W. S. SMITH, President. 



PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 



AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier. 



U. S. DEPOSITORY 



Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits Over $145,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid on 
special deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 





DIRECTORS 




V. S. Smith 


Elmer W. Strlckler 


Peter N. Rutt 


^ W. Qrofl 


J. S. Rlsser 


B. L. Q«yer 


1. 0. Qlnder 


Amos 0. Coble 


B. E. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



^ "T he Hous e of Good Clothes" f 




Get that Aitumn Suit or Overcoat off your mind and on your back. A "High 
Art" Model will compliment your tasle and your tailor. 

"THE STORE ACCOMMODATING" 

S. M. MYERS & CO., i\^i 

_^ CLOTHIERS, HATTERS AND FURNISHERS , 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



^♦' H"l"H i- | i*- | i* » » » » » »' M"l"H"l"H 'l " l "H -4i I lliaillllBIIIHIIIIHIIIIIBIIIII 



SHOES 




More and more ^ 

Elizabeth t own 4' 

feet are getting 4. 

the habit of keep- ^ 

ing comp'ny with * 

onr Shoe Depart- ^t 

ment. There's a ^ 

reason of course. * 

Prices very, very + 

easy on the purse ^ 

and easy on the i| 

"" ' t 



feet 

for the 
family. 



foi 
-hole 



Huntzberger-Winters Co. $ 

* Department Store * 

I 



L 



ELIZABETHTO-WN, PA. 



This space is reserved for 
The ELIZABETHTOWN 
& MARIETTA ELEC- 
TRIC LIGHT CO. 



m COLUMBIAN and RED CRUSS 

I Heaters and Ranges. 

i THE FINEST LINES MADE 




JOS. H. Rider & Son 



jaiiiiniiiiii 



I WE EARNESTLY SOLICIT A 
I LIBERAL PATRONAGE 



I 



FOR 



LUMBER 

AND MILL-WORK 

Cement, Slate, 

Sackett Plaster Board, 

Patent Plaster, 

Rubcioid Rooflng, 

White Coat, 

Mapes & Miller's Fertilizer, 

Ruberine Paint, 

and all kinds ot 
Building Material. 
We aim to give a square deal that will 
merit your trade and friendship. 
Give lis a trial. 

MUTH BROTHERS. 

EI;IZ.\BETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writi 



■IIUIBllllBIIIIBIIIIiaillllBIIIHBIIIIIBIIIilBlllllBIIUIBIIIIIBIIIIIBIIIIH 

GET THIS BIG | 

POULTRY REFERENCE BOOK | 





GREID£R'S FINE CATALOG m 

1912 has 224 pp containing 67 pictures of show fowls 5 
in natural colors Largest and most practical pnultry g 
book published for experienced raisers. Its text is so H 
clear and concise that beginners can eisily understand g 
and master it. Price 15 cents § 

B. H. GREIDER, BoxCRHEEM S. PA.|| 

lii ■llliH!H ■illilHIIIBili:HIII!IBinHllliBllllinil1!BiBliliia¥ 

« » 

I You Can Improve Your | 



By Subscribing for 
THE BUSINESS EDUCATOR 

By Practicing from 
THE ZANER METHOD MANUAL 

or By Attending 
THE ZANERIAN COLLEGE 



For CirculsTs, Prices, Etc. 
Apply to 



I ZANER & BLOSER CO. | 

^ Penmanship Specialists J^ 

I Columbus, - - Ohio | 



We Are Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
Made To Order 

Plain 
Clothing 

In This Country 



Lancaster it will pay 
,isit ours, .the only 



When 

you ti 

Clothing Store in that city that 

has One Price to All and gives 

discounts to none. .See us for 



Men's Ready Made and 
Made to Order 

Clothing 

AND 

Furnishings 



Youth's and Boys* 
Clothing 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Since 1S54 at 
Centre Square, Next to City Hall 

Lancaster, Pa. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 




Everybody 
Loves a 
Winner 

Year after year, as steadily 
as clockwork, the 



UNDERWOOD 

Typewriter | 



n speed and reliability by winning every type. 
at the Annual Business Show at Madison Square 



demonstrates its superiority 
writing- contest in every cla; 
Garden, New York City. 

1911 RECORDS 

World's Professional Championship (One Hour) 



Ist- UNDERWOOD 
2nd— UNDERWOOD 
3rd— UiNDER WOOD 
4th— UNDERWOOD 
5th— UNDKRWOOD 



112 wdrds per minute 

111 

107 

107 

106 

W^orld's Amateur Championship (Thirty Minutes) 
1st— UNDERWOOD Gus R. Trefzger 98 words per minute 

2nd— UNDERWOOD 
3rd — UNDERWOOD 
4th— UNDERWOOD 



H. O. Blaisdell 
Florence E. Wilson 
Rose L. Fritz 
E. A. Trefzger 
.1. L. Hoyt 



Margaret B. Owen 
Bessie Friedman 
Lottie E Betts 



World's School Championship (Fifteen Minutes) 

Ist— UNDERWOOD William F. Oswald 77 words per minute 

World's Edison Transcribing Contest (Ten Minutes) 
Ist— UNDERWOOD Lottie E. Betts 03 words per minutes 

NOTE — Above records are net. Five words were deducted for each and everv error. 

The oHicial record of the UNDERWOOD for one hour's work is 26 wonls per minute 
greater than the best olhcial record of any other competing machine. 

F:very UNDERWOOD used in above Championship Contests is a STOCK .Machine, an 
exact duplicate of which can be purchased in every large city in the world. 



The Machine You Will Eventually Buy." 

25 N. Third St., 
HARRI8BURG,PA. 



Underwood Typewriter Co., Inc. 



(i«r OloUpgp ®tmp0 



Elizabkthtown, Pa., January, 1912 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Elizabeth Myer Editor-in-Chief 

VV. K. Gish, '14 School Notes 

Mamie Keller, '12 Society News 

Levi Ziegler, '13 Society News 

W. F. Eshelman, '12 Exchanges 

Leah M. Sheaflfer, '09 Alumni Editor 

Ralph W. Schlosser, '11 Business Manager 

Daisy P. Rider, '10 Art Editor 



Published monthly during the school year. 

This paper will be sent continuously to old subscribers, so as not to break their files, and ar- 
rearages charged, unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration. 
Address all business commuuications to the Business Manager. 
Terms : 50 cents per year ; single copies, 10 cents. 



y»j^^/l»>i' *» <^ U n n ^t ^/|»»ii » ^W< * ■ O ^tf» '•mt 



.► IMPORTANT! STUDENTS I 



DO YOU KNOW THAT 

TT is only because of the kind patronage of our business and our profes. 
•^ sional men in this town and elsewhere, that this magazine exists. They 

have indeed shown themselves friends of Our College and of " Our Col- 
lege Times." 

Therefore, we justly and fairly may ask you, when about to buy any- 
thing, to consider first those who by their advertising have made this maga- 
zine possible- 

We have solicited only advertisers who are reliable in all respects- 



! 



I READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS 



.^ww;» 



U'^ 



BUSINESS MANAGER OF "OtTR COIXB6E TIBCES 



The Ethical Function ot the School 



Amos G. Hottenstein, '08. 



THE advance of the world has 
been marked by an advancing 
and developing system of edu- 
cation. As the world has advanced 
more phases and elements of life have 
been made departments of training. 
Men who formerly dug into the earth 
with rude shovels in search for ore, 
without a thought of previous school- 
ing, are now trained into mining engi- 
neers. Men instead of measuring land 
by ploughing it with oxen and count- 
ing the number of days as our fore- 
fathers did are now trained as civil 
engineers. Schools for journalism, 
business,, trades, sewing, cooking, re- 
place the incidental instruction given 
ill former days, by the editor to his 
assistant, the business man to his 
clerk, the employer to his apprentice, 
the mother to her daughter. The play 
of children has been handed over to 
the teacher in the kindergarten to be 
made more fruitful, and even teaching 
itself has been made the subject of in- 
struction and men are taught how to 
teach. 

But the nineteenth century has 
handed down to the twentieth a ma- 
terial civilization which has suddenly 
outrun all other factors and elements 
in the development of a world life. It 
is an exaggeration to say that the 
]jroblem of a material basis for a new 
and better vv-orld life has in many re- 
spects been solved? The telegraph 
and telephone, the printing-press and 
post office already answer every prac- 



tical purpose. The railroad and steam 
ship in their various forms have suffi- 
ciently solved the problems of the 
discovery and use of material, and the 
physical forces by which to make the 
finished products have also been ade- 
quately solved. 

In this difficult work of creating a 
material basis for a new and better 
world life, education has had an im- 
portant part. But there yet remains 
the more difficult problem of convert- 
ing all our manifold wealth and power 
into the highest life and of building a 
higher life on this material basis. If 
education in the nineteenth century 
has been important, in the twentieth 
century in its broadest sense, it must 
be supreme. Material development 
left to itself does not rise into the 
higher symmetrical life, but in the 
main it gravitates downward and that 
with crushing force at places. 

Many of these facts and conclusions 
apply with particular force to the 
United States. Here is more steam 
power, more applied electricity, here 
more wheat and cotton is raised, more 
iron is produced, more coal is mined 
than in any other country. Who can 
fortell the privileges and possibilities 
of this position even in the near fu- 
ture? And yet, with all these advan- 
tages and all these possibilities the 
United States has its capital and labor 
problem, its immigration problem, all 
demanding solution. Surelj here we 
must bend everv energv to the discov- 



I 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



— f 

ery and utmost development of every 
educational and religious resource. If 
there be any unused power in ed- 
ucation to give new efficiency to 
Christianity, or in Christianity to give 
new power to education, or in a com- 
bination of the two in order to set 
great moral forces at work in the 
world, the utmost power is needed by 
the twentieth century and most of all 
in our own land. President Roosevelt 
has said that "sturdy, self-respecting 
morality, and instant response to the 
very call on the spirit of brotherly love 
and neighborly kindness — these quali- 
ties must rest at the foundation of 
good citizenship in this republic, if it 
is to achieve the greatness we hope 
for it among the nations of mankind." 
We here notice that the relation of 
moral culture to material and national 
development and find this relation to 
be one of supreme importance, but we 
must also notice that moral together 
with religious education is the most 
important element of culture. The 
qualities given by it are needed in the 
right performance of every act; they 
are required hourly and by every one. 
The knowledge that the square of the 
hypotenuse is equivalent to the sum 
of the squares of the two legs may be 
of practical value once a year but we 
need to practice courage, juctice and 
veracity to ourselves and • others a 
score of times every hour. If a man 
has intellectual powers, he can make 
exchangeable articles; but if he has 
not veracity, altruism and faith his 
powers cannot enrich the world . If he 
has intellectuality alone, his life and 
work is likely to perish at any moment 
but if he has a developed spiritual na- 
ture whatever he accomplishes is es- 



tablished, is multiplied, and endures. 

In the future the moral element of 
life will be of even greater importance. 
Just in proportion as the relations of 
life will become more numerous and 
the interests of society more various 
and manifold, the range of possible 
oft'enses will be continually enlarging. 
More exchange calls for more moral- 
ity; more wealth for more love; more 
truth for more faith. In life the moral 
together with the religious element is 
and always must be the largest. The 
soul which is the most truly moral as 
well as religious will be the one which 
will find life the most precious, and 
will search out the means of preserv- 
ing it ; he will do all in his power to 
make life full of pleasure and comfort 
for all his fellow creatures. Ethical 
training may well rise, as the Herbar- 
tians affirm, as the first element and 
aim of education. Such being the 
position of the ethical element in edu- 
cation, and such its relations to the 
other elements we must consider what 
important work the school as compar- 
ed with the other institutions of civil- 
ization, has to do in order to make the 
ethical element as effective a part as 
possible in a general system of edu- 
cation. 

The function of the church as an in- 
stitution of civilization is religious 
teaching and some kinds of moral 
instruction can propably best be given 
in connection with such teaching. 
Some persons, however, will insist 
that moral training should be given 
entirely by the church in connection 
with the Sunday School. But in spite 
of the grand work done by the church- 
<s and Sunday Schools — for they 
teach what is right and give direction 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



and inspiration — but they cannot train 
like the home and school. Training 
takes far more time than that spent in 
Sunday School and church. The influ- 
ence of the teaching that can be given 
in an hour is little as compared to the 
training which the child receives for 
sixteen hours a day and seven days in 
a week. Then again the church and 
Sunday School are under the disad- 
vantage of divorcing intellectual and 
physical education from the moral. 
The whole child, mental, moral, and 
physical can best be trained in actual 
life and in secular activities. Further- 
more this institution fails to reach the 
increasing majority entirely outside of 
its refining influences. Can the State 
which depends for its very life on the 
intelligence and morality of the indi- 
vidual permit these millions to in- 
crease in number and strength that 
lack this moral training which is ab- 
solutely necessary in a democratic 
form of government? Asking the 
question is answering it. We must 
have besides the church a more uni- 
versal method. 

No one will deny the universality of 
the home and certain it is, that the 
home should pay much attention to 
this subject and not attempt to shift 
the whole responsibility on others. 
However, the fact remains that many 
of the functions of the home have been 
delegated to the schools. The Ameri- 
can hon^p. "the very heart of society 
ou": of v.li'cli arc the ir.'--ues cf Hic," is 
falling further short of its moral oppor- 
tunity in the cultivation of the youth 
than any other social institution. This 



added burden rests upon the schools 
until through the reformation of fam- 
ily life, where needed, there shall once 
again be a fair division of responsibil- 
ity. 

But the school has also the predom- 
inant condition for moral training 
which the home does not have, that is, 
community life, the society of the 
school. The social factor in education 
stands far above methods, subjects, 
principle, above all other factors. It 
is not possible to educate the child at 
home by a private tutor. "The great- 
est study of mankind is man." Through 
gaining knowledge of other characters, 
through perception of weakness and 
strength, feeling of duty, unselfish 
giving of one's self for the good of the 
community, the child acquires lessons 
more necessary to his well-being than 
all his book lessons in themselves. 

The inestimable glory of the com- 
mon schools is that it contains all the 
necessary factors of an embryonic 
democracy. If the altruistic motive 
controls the teacher and his methods, 
the conditions are perfect. Here meas- 
ures of history are acquired by actual 
experience; here civics is essentially 
practiced. The home is the centre of 
the child, the church makes the home 
better, but the common school Ls the 
place where the lessons gained in both 
are essentially practised. Here the 
children of the rich and poor learn to 
respect each other : the intelligent and 
ihc irnorant arc i;'.c::cc-l by r.iuUial 
action and love. Order, work and play 
all tend to the cultivation of true man- 
hood. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



The Clever Thief 



L. W. Leiter, '14 



John Mason and his brother, James, 
lived on a large farm in the heart of 
the beautiful Cumberland Valley. The 
boys were robust farmers, who adored 
the beauties of nature, and both had a 
keen sense of activity. Accordingly, 
just before the autumn work began, 
they decided to have some adventures 
and to see the great and wonderful 
Blue Ridge Mountains. 

On a Monday morning as the first 
rays of the sun shone across the hori- 
zon, they set out with their faithful 
mule, Jack, that carried their camping 
outfit. The queer looking combination 
passed fields rich with corn, meadows 
feeding cattle and swine, and hillsides 
abounding in luscious, juicy, red- 
cheeked peaches. They finally came to 
the foot of the mountain, and being 
very tired they decided to prepare 
their supper and erect their tent for 
the night. John placed the stove out- 
side the tent flap and began to prepare 
the meal, while James carefully fed 
the mule and picketted him within a 
few yards of the tent. After supper 
was over and everything was arranged 
for the night, they watched the sun 
sinking in his glory and soon after- 
wards they fell fast asleep. 

They awoke at daybreak to find 
their camp in a state of confusion. 
Their stove was upset, their pies which 
were in the stove were stolen and the 
milk in the large bucket was drunk, 
the cover lying at its side on the table. 
The blanket which had been placed on 



the mule was lying near the stove, the 
thief evidently intending to take it 
along. "Who do you think did this?" 
inquired John. "I can see no tracks 
near the tent or the stove except those 
made by our mule when we unpacked 
the outfit." Suddenly James cried out, 
"The stake to which Jack was tied is 
pulled out ! I believe the thief must 
have been scared away, John, I actual- 
ly believe he meant to steal our mule. 
"Who might it have been?" "What 
shall we do?" After holding a con- 
sultation they decided to leave the 
place as soon as possible. 

After their hasty breakfast was end- 
ed, they proceeded along the mountain 
road, slowly ascending the high moun- 
tain. They traveled on and on admiring 
the valley below with its fields of 
green and brown intermingled. In 
addition to the beauties of the valley 
on either side of the road they passed 
chestnut trees loaded with burrs, and 
here and there an oak grove. 

Seeing a large bare spot in the dis- 
tance, they decided to explore it. After 
tying Jack to a tree they began to 
climb rock after rock. Satisfied with 
climbing the rocks they started back 
to Jack and on their way they met a 
man with a large club. "What are you 
doing with that club?" asked John. 
The man replied, "I am looking for a 
snake. The other day I was out at this 
very place and I climbed to the top of 
yonder rock to sleep in the sun. Then 
I noticed that the rock seemed to 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



move. I was frightened and started to 
run. But I said to myself only cowards 
run ; so I went back to learn the cause. 
Now, under that huge massive rock 
lay a big, black snake coiled up in 
sleep and whenever he inhaled a breath 
he raised the boulder which would, as 
he exhaled, fall back with a "plunk." 
I had been losing some of my cattle 
and directly before that snake I saw 
the head of one of my big Jersey cows. 
He had eaten all except the head. To- 
day, I am come to find that snake." 
He also told the boys that the place 
on account of the large rocks and the 
great number of snakes was called the 
"Devil's Race Course." The boys, al- 
though they doubted the truth of the 
story, were nevertheless much fright- 
ened. 

The boys decided to leave the place 
at once. They quickly loosed Jack. 
Then with John riding the mule and 
James walking, they proceeded on 
their way. Jack went only a short dis- 
tance until he became frightened at 
some object — the boys thought he 
must have seen or smelled the large 
snake — and he began to kick and rear 
and then started to run as fast as he 
could. Finally, John managed to bring 
the mule under his control. They 
then went back to find James. After 
going some distance they found him 
sitting by the roadside trembling from 
fright. 

After conferring with each other, 
for a short time, they decided to go in- 
to camp for the night, both having had 
enough adventures for the day. After 
supper was finished John took special 
care to cover their large milk bucket 
?nd placed it under the flap of the tent. 
He placed the table with pies, cakes. 



apples, peaches and wheat biscuits on 
i: directly inside the canvas, thinking 
that in case another invasion should 
be made, they would hear the thief. 
The boys, shaken up and tired out by 
the adventures of the day, were soon 
sound asleep— a sleep such as nature 
alone sends to relieve wearied bodies. 
In the morning, after sunrise, James 
not being as tired as John, awoke to 
find the tent flap pushed aside which 
he knew was carefully closed the even- 
ing before. "John, John, Get up, 
John !" he cried ; "they've been here 
again." "Who-o-o-o?" sleepily mur- 
mured John. "The robbers, John, the 
robbers ! Get up ! Get up !" On looking 
around they found the cover oflf the 
milk bucket and the milk drunk; the 
wheat biscuits seemingly were eaten 
from the dish as it was very dirty. "I 
think they might have washed their 
dishes," dryly remarked John. In addi- 
tion, the pies, the cakes, the apples, and 
even the peaches were gone ; the cover 
of the basket containing these eatables 
was found outside, dirty and torn. The 
stove was upset and broken as if a 
man had kicked it over. But no clue 
to the thief was to be found. "The 
thief is evidently a shrewd and a bold 
one," said John. 

After the scanty breakfast was hasti- 
ly ended, they hastened away from 
this place fearing that they might be 
held up any minute. They went only 
a short distance, however, when 
the mule began kicking ar.d rearing, 
throwing James off. Then they de- 
cided to lead him. Finally, after decid- 
ing to walk back to their homes — a 
distance of about twenty-five miles — 
both boys agreed to sell the mule if 
possible to the first farmer they met 



OUR COLLE'GE TIMES 



13 



as a first class mule and a good leader 
— for he led very well when the boys 
had hold of the bridle. They soon 
found a farmer who was glad to pur- 
chase such a good leader at the reason- 
able price that the boys offered him. 

Being relieved of their burden the 
boys started homeward having seen all 
the country and having had all the ad- 
ventures they desired. They travelled 
only five miles until night overtook 
them. Tired and hungry they lay 
down beneath the trees, for they had 
given the camping outfit to the man 
to whom they had sold the mule. 
However, in the morning, tired and 
footsore from walking so much, they 
decided to go back for the mule. He 



was easily purchased from the farmer. 

"I would kill that mule if I would 
keep him a week," said the farmer. 
"That mule pushed the kitchen door 
open which had stood ajar, walked in- 
to our house, ate our pies, our cakes, 
our apples, our pears, and even tasted 
a large pumpkin ; he pushed the lid off 
the milk bucket, drank the milk and 
upset the stove with a kick as if he ex- 
pected to find more to eat in it. I say, 
I would kill him if I were you." 

The boys said not a word but quiet- 
ly proceeded on their journey, leading 
the mule. Finally James said, "John, 
this same mule has been our robber." 
That was exactly what I was think- 
ing" replied John. 




Goodbye, Old Year! 

And as the moments slip away. 
The midnight bells sweep o'er the 
sky-- 
"Goodbye, Old Year," — we softly say, 
"Oh, dear Old Year, — good-bye — 
good-bye !" 

"Go, long tried friend — we part in 
peace'^ 
Thine hour is come, thy tale is told ; 
Time gives the signal for release — 



And thou art with the days of old!" 
Helen Marioe Burnside. 
Oh, New Year, teach us faith! 

We'll hold our patient hands, each in 

his place. 
And trust thee to the end; 
Knowing thou leadest onward to those 
spheres 
Where there are neither days, nor 

months, nor years. 

— Dinah Muloch Craik. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Elizabethtown College is now eleven 
years old — "goin' on twelve." 

New Year Greeting 

Our College Times extends a cor- 
dial N^w Year's greeting to subscrib- 
ers, advertisers, and all other friends. 

We gratefully acknowledge the sup- 
port and the co-operation which has 
made the success of our paper possible 
in the past, and we kindly solicit your 
contipued patronage and encourage- 
ment during the New Year which is 
just opening. 

Pnst, Present and Future 

"The good old days" and "The gold- 
en age to come" are phrases that ap- 
peal very strongly to both sentiment 
.-and imagination. The appeal has its 
work to do. We are not to forget the 
good the past has achieved, and we are 
to look to the future with expectation 
of better things. Yet withal, it is none 
the less our privilege to rejoice in the 
present and find its values. However 
good the past has been, the pre'^ent is, 
in relation to the past, a golden age ; 
it is the sum of all the good — the gold— 
the world has ever known. Also in 
relation to the future, the piesent is 
a golden age fo- it is crov/ded with 
golden '-iportuniiies to set influences 
at work that shall make the w-orld bet- 
ter for ourselves and for all who shall 
•come after. — The New Century Teach- 
ers' Monthly. 

National Blessings 

DURING the year that has just 
closed our dear Heavenly 
Father has blessed us in every 
activity of life. But to my mind the 



greatest of all blessings of the year is 
the work of the Church which in all 
her departments has prospered as 
never before. 

Think ol the great Sunday School 
Conventions tiiat were held during the 
_year, and what they have done for he 
advanceinei;t of religion in encourag"r.g 
Bible sa'dy 

Foreign ?nd Home Mission.^ have 
prospered greatly. The spirit of sacri- 
fice is manifested in the fathers and 
mothers ^\ho have consecrated their 
sons artd c'aughters to the service of 
our Lord. Hearts have been touched 
by God's Sv-irit and many soulf have 
been won for Him. Liberal oflferings 
were given for Missionary Work. For- 
eign Missionaries have enjoyed good 
health and their work has been blessed 
indeed. 

In connection with Missionary work, 
we should regard the Laymen's Con- 
vention that was held in Lancaster 
City a few weeks ago a great blessing 
to our country. Three thousand men 
were present at that assembly ; and do 
you know that the object was to inter- 
est the business men of Lancaster 
County in Mission work? 

Closely associated with the Church 
is the Woman's Christian Temperance 
Union. The work done by the W. C. 
T. U. this year is a blessing to our 
country almost as great as the work of 
the Church. The influence of this 
work upon the lives of men will be 
one of the means of wiping from our 
land the liquor traffic. 

It might be well for us to consider at 
this time the work done by the Anti- 
Saloon League. Think of the blessing 
that has come to our land through men 
of strong Christian character, who have 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



sacrificed their Sundays in order to in- 
fluence men to abstain from using 
strong drink. 

The victory that was won in Maine 
this fall in favor of Local Option is a 
valuable blessing to our country. 

But let us not forget what a great 
blessing the educational advantages 
are to our country. Oh, the blessings of 
the Public School system! About 80 
years ago people paid more to educate 
their children in private schools than 
the entire amount of the school tax at 
the present time. Only the rich could 
educate their children, but today there 
are in the United States besides all the 
many Public Schools about eight 
thousand High Schools whose doors 
are open to rich and poor alike. 

Another blessing to our country is 
the work done among the country boys 
by the Y. M. C. A., the greatest or- 
ganization of men in the world. Its 
aim is to furnish a strong Christian 
man as a leader among country boys 
in every community to help the boys 
form strong characters ; for, it is upon 
the country boy that the future work 
of the nation depends. 

Do you know that every president 
of the United States except seven, was 
raised on the farm? And do you real- 
ize that eighty per cent, of all the suc- 
cessful men in the business and the 
piofessional world were men who were 
raised in the country? And the fact 
that so many country boys have found 
their wav into schools, colleges, and 
universities, during the year is a bless- 
ing that cannot be over estimated. 

Again, the New School Code that 
was passed is a blessing to our country 
that should not be forgotten. It pre- 
vents that class of people from teach- 



ing, who today are working in opposi- 
tion to and even trying to break up our 
splendid public school system. 

On the other hand, our Father has 
saved from pestilence and famine such 
as now are threatening the lives of 
eight million people in Russia. In con- 
trast to this our farm productions have 
been abundant and our industries have 
produced more than the United States 
can consume. 

Materially and spiritually, we were 
blessed during the year far above many 
other nations. Conditions in general in 
the United States were improved dur- 
ing the year. The political machine 
in Philadelphia was broken up. Trusts 
are being investigated and the fact that 
California voted in favor of woman's 
suffrage, shows that the United States 
has respect for woman which is in- 
deed a blessing to our country. 

We were saved from war. The Unit- 
ed States experienced years ago such 
conditions as now exist in China. We 
should be very thankful for the bless- 
ings of peace, and for the work that 
was done during the year toward es- 
tablishing universal peace. 

— Edgar Diehm for Thanksgiving 
program. 

Miss Orca Z. Miller of Mechanics- 
burg, who was a student here several 
years ago, is now Assistant Matron in 
the Burd School, and Episcopal Insti- 
tution for young Girls, located at Six- 
tv-third and Market Streets, Philadel- 
phia. 

Besides her work as matron, she is 
pursuing studies in German and Do- 
mestic Science. Miss Miller thus is 
getting practice with theory in Domes- 
tic Science. 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Don't forget the Bible Term ! It be- 
gins January 11 and lasts ten days. El- 
der Kurtz Miller, of Brooklyn, Elder 
Gakn B. Royer, of Elgin, Illinois, S. 
H. Hertzler, of Elizabethtown, togeth- 
er with several members of the College 
Faculty will do the teaching during the 
Bible Term. You can't afford to miss 
hearing them. 

Write to Dr. D. C. Reber that you 
are coming and tell him how long you 
can stay. 

School closes for the holiday vaca- 
tion on Thursday, December 21 and 
opens again on Tuesday, January 2, at 
9 a. m. 

Send for our catalogue if you are in- 
terested in College work. A postal 
-card addressed to Pres. D. C. Reber 
•will bring the answer. 

President Henry H. Appel, of F. & 
M. College writes, — "I have very 
pleasant recollections of my trip to 
Elizabethtown College." 

Because of serious illness. Trustee 



J. W. G. Hershey, of Lititz, has recent- 
ly had a leg amputated. His friends 
despaired of his recovery but have 
reasons to be more hopeful at present. 

We neglected in our last issues to 
report the death of Amos Kuhn's fath- 
er which occurred October 25, caused 
by accidental shooting. He was a min- 
ister of the church known as the Breth- 
ren in Christ, and grandfather to Miss 
Orpha Kuhns, who is at present a stu- 
dent here. We extend sympathies to 
all these bereaved friends. 

Sympathies 

Our hearts go out in sympathy to the 
Board of Directors, Public School 
Teachers, school children, citizens, 
janitor, and all people of the vicinity 
of Elizabethtown, who feel the loss 
and inconvenience sustained by the 
burning of their beautiful new High 
School Building, which occurred on 
Monday, Dec. 11, at five o'clock in the 
morning. Spontaneous combustion a- 
mong the coals lying in the cellar is 
supposed to have been the cause of 
the fire. 



Bible Term For 1912 



The Twelfth Annual Session of the 
Bible Term will be held at the College 
from January 11 to 21, only ten days. 
Let every one take in the entire term. 
Please note following Daily and Spe- 
cial Programs: — 

Daily Program — Morning 

9.00 Chapel Exercises. 

9.20 John's Epistles, J. K. Miller. 



10.00 Romans, S. H. Hertzler. 

10.40 Holy Spirit. G. B. Royer. 

11.20 Studies from St. Marie, three 
lessons. J. H. Keller: Prayer, five les- 
sons. Jesse Ziegler. 

Afternoon 

1.40 Parables of our Lord, G. B. 
Royer. 

2.20 Messages from great Bible 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



Chapters, J. K. Miller. 

3.00 Sunday School Pedagogy, four 
lessons, H. K. Ober; Psalms, three 
lessons, Lydia Stauffer. 

3.40 Vocal Music, Kathryn Miller. 
Evening 

6.45 Song Service, Kathryn Miller. 

7.00 Evangelistic Sermon, Elder G. 
B. Royer. 

Educational Program 

Jan. 13, 2 p. m. (Will be announced 
later.) 

^Missionary and Temperance Program 
Jan. 20. 2 P. M. 

Moderator — R. W. Schlosser . 

Devotional Exercises. 

Song. 

How may our Local Congregations 
Became Aggressive Factors in the 
Temperance Cause? — J. B. Asper. 

Song. 

Why Should Every Congregation 
"have a Mission Study Class? — Mazie 
R. Martin. 

Our Greatest Needs in Missions — 
•Galen B. Royer. 

Song 

Round Table— D. K. Kilhefner. 

1. How may our Brethren Col- 
leges become more Active Centers of 
Temperance Work? 

2. What can we do to encourage 
•our young people to prepare for the 
Mission Field? 

3. What are some of the hindran- 
■ces in preparing for Mission Work?. 

4. What Constitutes a Missionary 
Call? 

Missionary Offering. 

Sunday School Program 

Jan. 14, 2 P. M., College Chapel 

Moderator— W. K. Gish 



1. Music. 

2. Invocation, J. Kurtz Miller. 

3. The Organized Sunday School 
Class, Mamie Keller. 

4. How Interest the Indifferent? 
Elizabeth Myer. 

5. Music. 

6. The Most Dangerous Neglects of 
a Sunday School Teacher, D. V. Shank 

7. The Graded Lesson System for 
the Primary Department, Lydia Stauf- 
fer. 

8. Music. 

Boarding and lodging for the ten 
days will be $5.00. For less than the 
full term 60 cents per day. Those not 
lodging at the College will be expected 
to contribute (say $1.00) towards de- 
fraying the expenses of the special 
teachers. Contributions from the 
others for the same purpose will be ap- 
preciated. Single meal tickets at Col- 
lege dining room, 20c. Lodging per 
single night. 15 cents. 

A limited amount of room at the Col- 
lege is available for Bible term stu- 
dents. Those desiring to lodge at the 
College should apply at once stating 
when they are coming and how long 
they intend to stay. All accounts are 
to be settled with J. Z. Herr, Treasur- 
er. On arriving at the depot, take 
Pierce's hack for the College. Bring 
Brethren Hymnal, Bible, towel, soap, 
and a woolen blanket (if the weather 
is very cold.) 

Further information, on application 
to 

D. C. REBER, President. 



A noble life, with poetry that flows 
In mighty music of the major cloud." 
— Juniata Echo. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




% School Note S^' 



Youmo^cSur 




Many students spent Thanksgiving 
vacation at their homes, but about a 
dozen remained at the school where 
they enjoyed a bountiful Thanksgiving 
feast, and a few quiet days. Some one 
remarked that there were more "turn 
up" dainties served in the reception 
room during these days of leisure. 
At least, the short vacation was bene- 
ficial to all, for a number of teachers 
upon their return, noted that the ma- 
jority of the College Hill people wore 
broader smiles, and that hearts were 
"Leiter" than ever. 

The school was glad to welcome the 
new students who enrolled at the be- 
ginning of the winter term. The lit- 
tle initiation given the new boys on 
Memorial Hall, was taken in good 
spirit by the new comers, who have 
since become acquainted with dormi- 
tory life and their new environment. 

A few questions recently asked: 

Mr. Myers — "Miss L. S., are you 
getting company the night of the re- 
c-tr.P" Reply— "Dear l'r!0"-«." 

Miss Adams — Oh, why is this the 
little spelling teacher?" 

Mr. Nefif— "Why had we no milk for 
breakfast the morning of the fire in 
town ?" 

Miss Mathias— C'Xt lunch) Oh, 



George, ? 

Memorial Boys — "Say, Chum, where 
was George, Dec. 17?" 

On the night of Dec. 19th, the 
Music Department of the school ren- 
dered a very excellent recital, consist- 
ing of vocal and instrumental selec- 
tions. 

Dec. 20th, Prof. Elmer Schreiner of 
Akron, Ohio, favored us with an in- 
spiring lecture, "The Awakening." 
This was an extra number and quite a 
treat. 

Prof. Ober's illustrated lecture on 
Dec. 14, entitled "Python Snakes and 
tlic American Boy" was quite a suc- 
cess. The audience was large and ap- 
preciative. 

Some students and a few teachers at- 
tended regularly the protracted meet- 
ings in the Church of the Brethren in 
town from Dec. 2nd, to the 17th, with 
John Zug of Elizabethtown as minister 

Prof. Ober superintended the spray- 
ing of the College orchard, a few weeks 
apo. 

To those interested in the physical 
and chemical department of the insti- 
tution, it will be of interest to learn 
that an exceptionally fine air pump has 
just been received from Cologne. Ger- 
many. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



Mr. Rose's latest literary production : 
I'll have the pie, — 

Please pass the pie, — 
Js there no pie? 

I want some pie ! 

Mr. Christman — "What's the mat- 
ter. Burgess?" 

Mr. B. — "G'on you're always trying 
to run my character down at the table." 

Mr. C. — "What d'you mean, what did 
I ever do?" 

Mr. B.— "You. . . .A. . . .Well. . .you 
put pepper in my water.".. 

Information regarding Mr. Diehm's 
whereabouts may be had at any time 
"by inquiring at Hertzler Brothers. 

"The beautiful regular flower beds, 
the smell of the woods, and the small 
yet commodious pavilions make us 
think of Pluto's Republic." How in- 
viting, Mr. Waltz! 



Keystone Literary Society Notes 

The K. L. S. has been showing 
a spirit for doing something. Society 
Hall has been papered. New members 
have been added to the ranks, and the 
meetings are showing work and prep- 
aration on the part of those that take 
part in the programs. The new mem- 
bers are falling in line and standing by 
their Society. The 'College Hill Quar- 
tet" has been appearing at each meet- 
ing. From appearances, the boys' ef- 
forts are appreciated. The Society and 
especially the Quartet miss Mr. Levi 
Zeigler, who has not returned to 
school for the winter term. 

The meeting on the evening of Nov. 
17, was interesting as well as instruct- 
ive. The new officers were inaugurated 
and assumed their duties. The chief 
features were : "The President's In- 



augural Address," the three essays on 
"Modes of Travel — 'In Colonial Times, 
by C. J. Rose; 'Today, by Miss Irene 
Sheetz; 'Fifty Years Hence," by V. C. 
Holsinger ; and the music by the Quar- 
tet. 

On November 24, in celebration of 
Thanksgiving, the following program 
was given : 

1. Music. 

2. Thanksgiving Proclamation, Ira 
Coble. 

3. Review of National Blessings 
during the year, E. G. Deihm. 

4. Debate : Resolved, That Thanks- 
giving day brings with it more pleas- 
ures and greater significance than the 
Fourth of July. The affirmative speak- 
ers were Mamie Price and Orville 
Becker. 

The negative speakers were Orpha 
Harshberger and Isaac Foreman. 

5. Music — Piano Duet, Misses Erb 
and Dennis. 

6. Essay — An Ideal Thanksgiving, 
Miss Mary Sheaflfer. 

7. Recitation — Thanksgiving Story, 
Rhoda Miller. 

Dec. 8 being the evening given to the 
Homerians, our program was rendered 
Dec. 9. For some reason, possibly be- 
cause it was Saturday evening, the at- 
tendance was not as large as it should 
have been. Ruth Reber recited "When 
Papa was a Boy." The vocal solos, 
"Rock me to Sleep," by Miss Dennis 
and "Little Girl Don't Cry," by Miss 
Erb, were appreciated by all. 

On Dec. 15 the new officers were in- 
augurated. The President, Mr. Christ- 
man, gave an address on "Capacity for 
Work." Other features were, — The 
vocal solo, by our vocal teacher. Miss 
Kathryn Miller; Select Reading by 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Paul M. Landis, the debate and the Lit- 
erary Echo. 

The Society is awakening to her 
needs and is taking strides towards 
supplying them. At the Executive 
session, Nov. 24, quite a bit of import- 
ant business was transacted. Several 
new offices were created. The new 
corps of officers is: — Pres., W. F. 
Christman; Vice Pres., A. L. Reber; 
Secretary, Edna Brubaker ; Critic, Prof 
J. G. Meyer; Editor, Miss Irene Wise; 
Chorister, W. K. Kulp ; Reporter, Har- 
ry Shank; Custodian, O. L. Becker; 
Recorder, H. H. Nye. 



DEPARTMENT WORK 
Music Department. 

SINCE the beginning of the Fall 
term the number of music stu- 
dents has been steadily increas- 
ing, so much so that we await with 
muoh pleas-re the coming of a tirrd 
teacher on Ja.i. 2r,d, 1912. 

Piano students nunil.icr ihirty-fonr 
arc voice st.i.lents twenty-one. Six 
girls are taking the full Music Course. 
Two classes in Harmony, one each, in 
History of Music, Solfeggio and Au- 
dition. Beginners, Vocal and Chorus 
Classes recite daily. 

At the close of the Fall term a pri- 
vate song recital was given by the fol- 
lowing voice students: — Lizzie Ging- 
rich, Ruth Erb, C. L. Martin, A. Louise 
Mathias, Sara Moyer, Bertha Hollinger 
r-rr^-^ Barc'ay. Mamie Keller, Edna 
Brubaker and Carrie Dennis. It is 
only by constantly "keeping at it" that 
we learn to forget self when we appear 
before the public in song. So take 
courage. Songsters ; next time it will be 
easier. 



On December 19, at 8 p. m. the fol- 
lowing Christmas program was given 
in Music Hall: — 

1. Chorus — No Shadows Yonder,. 
Gaul. 

2. Piano Duet — Queen of Fairies, S^ 
Smith, Misses Carrie Dennis and L 
Ruth Erb. 

3. Vocal Solo — I Fear No Foe, Pin- 
suti, C. L. Martin. 

4. Piano Solo — Dying Poet, Gotts- 
chalk, Gussie Barclay. 

5. Obligate Duet — Holy Nighty 
Lorenz, (Quartet Accom). Misses- 
Sheaffer and Reber, Misses Keller,. 
Miller, Messrs. Kulp, Holinger. 

6. Piano Trio — Gypsy Rondo,. 
Haydn, Misses Dennis, Barclay, Erb. 

7. Girls' Chorus — Shout the Glad 
Tidings, Alexander. 

8. Reading — The Trappers Xmas 
Summons, Walter K. Gish. 

9. Chorus — There Were Shepherds, 
Lorenz. 

10. Piano Quartet — Valse Brilliante 
Schuthoiif, Misses Dennis. Barclay. Erb 
Shank. 

11. Piano Soli— (a) Valse Op. 34- 
No. 1, Chopin ; (b) Prelude. Dream, 
Chopin, Carrie Dennis. 

12. Piano Duet — Midsummer 
Night's Dreams. Mendelssohn. Miss 
Sheaffer, Dennis. 



Bible and Religious Notes 

THIS term we have classes tak- 
ing regular work in the follow- 
ing courses : — Old Testament 
History, Bible Geography. Lesson 
Story Building and Epistles. Good in- 
terest is shown in all these classes. 

The class conducted in the home of 
Mrs. Frank Groff shows much earnest- 
ness and zeal. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



We have an enrollment of twenty in 
the Sunday morning "Sunrise" Class 
studying "Prayer,'' with an average at- 
tendance of seventeen for the Fall 
term. 

Our enrollment in Mission Study 
Class is twenty-six. The average at- 
tendance for the Fall term was twenty- 
one. The contributions for Missionary 
purposes, $7.76. 

Instead of the usual Course in 
Teacher Training at the College, a 
class has been organized in the church 
in town with an enrollment of twenty- 
three, with Miss Lydia StaufFer as 
teacher. 



Sewing Department 

THE Sewing Department is in- 
creasing both in numbers and 
interest. The work done at the 
opening of this term consists of the 
drafting of waists and sleeves, and cut- 
ting patterns therefrom to help stu- 
dents in their practical work. During 
the term patterns will be cut for dif- 
ferent styles of waists and sleeves. 
Skirt drafting will also be taken up 
during the Winter term. Three new 
students have enrolled since the last 
issue of the College Times, namely, Sa- 
lome Eshleman, Mt. Joy ; Noami T 
terline, Rheems ; Anna Grubb, Middle- 
town. This makes a total enrollmen 
of fifteen. 



Appretiated Kindnes<;es 
Through the kindness of Mr. Daniel 
Shank, Sr., the College orchard re- 
ceived a thorough spraying on Friday 
December 8. Mr. Shank had offered 
the sprayer and his assistance to Prof. 
Ober and, of course, the offer was 



heartily accepted. Prof. Ober put on 
some old clothes and rubber boots and 
with the assistance of Mr. Shank and 
Mr. S. B. Dennis, the janitor, the or- 
chard was thoroughly sprayed. The 
trees are in very fine condition and look 
very promising. The Agricultural De- 
partment is taking keen interest in 
them and the College hopes to enjoy a 
harvest of berries and a little fruit by 
next summer. This kindness on the 
part of Mr. Shank was very highly ap- 
preciated, and we take this opportunity 
to say with special emphasis, "Thank 
you, Mr. Shank, in behalf of our 
school." Mr. M. G. Gibble, of Master- 
sonville, who has always been a warm 
friend of the College, has made over 
fifty brooms from the broom corn 
which was raised on the campus. Al- 
though he did not donate all of his ser- 
vices, we appreciate this kindness. 



Agricultural Notes 
On December 13, the College sold 
one of its fat porkers which weighed 
dressed three hundred and forty-seven 
pounds. There is another ready for 
market by the time this is in print. It 
will likely also be turned into sausage, 
ham and pork. In the College hog sty 
there are 9 nice flourishing shoats 
which ought to make real nice porkers 
by next March. Mr. Dennis has done a 
little fall plowing and has covered part 
of the College Truck Patch with man- 
ure. The Collc"c :ii:v.s to raise all the 
plants it needs bj' next spring, such as, 
tomatoes, cabbage, celery, redbeets, 
sweet potato, sprouts, etc. The grape- 
vines have made very nice growth and 
we hope to put up an arbor for them 
by next spring. By present indications 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



they ought to bear. The celery, cab- 
bage, and other vegetables are housed. 
The corn is husked and fodder is being 
turned into manure. It is the ambition 
of those in charge of the Agricultural 
Department to make the orchard and 
truck patch a very helpful source of 
income to the College. 



Thanksgiving Vacation 

THE Fall Term ended on Wed- 
nesday, November 29. The ma- 
jority of the students went to 
their respective homes for several days 
vacation. On the following day five 
chickens were roasted and served as a 
Thanksgiving dinner. Some of the ac- 
companing dishes served were mashed 
potatoes, corn, celery, cranberries, 
pumpkin pie. fudge and apples. There 
were only twenty persons who re- 
mained to eat of this splendid amount 



and variety of food. 

During this vacation. Miss Elsie 
Adams, of Lititz, spent Saturday and 
Sunday with Ella Stoner, of Donegal 
Springs. Miss Myer and her mother 
visited their relatives in Philadelphia, 
eating their Thanksgiving dinner at 
the home of Mr. W. S. Grofif and fam- 
ily, at 1518 Edgely Street. Among the 
guests at this dinner were Elder D. 
W. Kurtz and wife, together with their 
little son, Albert Wheeler Kurtz, a 
bouncing boy of eight months. 

Miss Sheafifer went to her home at 
Bareville and Miss Kathryn Miller to 
her home at Greencastle. 

Several of the College people attend- 
ed the dedicatory service at Stevens 
Hill, where a new church-house was 
erected by the Brethren of Elizabeth- 
town congregation. This building is 
modern in construction and is forty by 
sixty feet in dimensions. 



Religious Appointments 

Regular Preaching Services: — 

Nov. 17, 7.30 p. m. — Sermon by Bro. 
R. W. Schlosser, Subject, Les- 
sons from Psalm 103. 

Nov. 24, 10.30 a. m. — Sermon by 
Bro. G. N. Falkenstein. Text— 
Heb. 11:24. Subject, "The Choice 
of Moses." 

Dec. 3 — No services (Vacation). 

Dec. 10 and 17 — No services (Series 
of Meetings in progress in town 
Church.) 
Christian Workers' Meetings: — 



Nov. 17, 7.30 p. m. — Leader Miss 
Katharine Miller. 
Prayer Meetings: — 

Nov. 22— Led by H. K. Eby. 
Sunday Bible Classes : — 

7.30 a. m. — "Prayer" taught by Miss 

Stauffer. 
8.15 a. m. — S. S. Lesson taught by 
Prof. J. G. Meyer. 
Missionary Reading Circle : — 
Saturday. 6.30 p. m. 
President— B. F. Waltz. 
Teacher — Miss Stauflfer. 
Reading — "The Unfinished Task." 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 




T^i^kZTIZnilXZZI^IiXJii^^^ 



Our exchanges now number more 
than three times as many as those of 
last year. This fact shows that we are 
progressing. Several new ones have 
arrived and are added to our list with 
pleasure. 

"Red and Black" has an attractive 
as well as an appropriate cover design 
for its November issue. One can read- 
ily see that this school has performed 
daring feats on the gridiron. 

The cuts for the different depart- 
ments in Shamokin High School Re- 
view are quite suggestive and show 
cleverness and originality on the part 
of the Art Editor. 

Lordsburg College Educator should 
have a table of contents. Some of the 
departments are rather weak, especial- 
ly 'l^e literriry and editorial. 

"Great movements spring from 
small beginnings, high attainments are 
born in humble hearts; but sincerity 
must be the life germ of every great 
movement and every high attain- 
ment." — Albright Bulletin. 



"Calvin Rose sat on a tack 

Calvin Rose." — Ex. 

"The garden in which woman can 
do her most important work is the 
home. Here are her true place and 
power; here shfe can do her best work 
and exert her most powerful influence 
for all that is noblest and best. But 
in order that she may have this pow- 
er, that she may brighten and bless the 
home with her very presence, she must 
be enduringly and incorruptibly good 
and instinctively wise ; hence her train- 
ing should be not so much for the 
purpose of knowing, as for that of in- 
spiring." 
— Western-Maryland College Monthly 

Teacher — "Fools often ask questions 
that no wise man could answer." 

Pnp'I — "T euess that's the reason 
then why I flunk so often in tests." 

First boy — "What would you do if 
you had water on your knee?" 
Second boy — "You got me." 
First bov — "W^ell I'd wear pumps." 
—Ex. 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



"In all his poems VanDyke is sim- 
ple, pure, and uplifting. He has given 
us much of his own personal experi- 
ence, and we learn to know of his 
noble and splendid character through 
his inspiring thoughts and messages. 
We can trust him for the best things, 
and this cannot be said of many of 
our present writers. Surely he has 
justly earned a place of honor as a 
writer of prose and as one of the Amer- 
ican poets we can truthfully say of 
him as he has said of Milton, — 
"How now big, Edgar, 
What makes your hair so red?" 
"I had the scarlet fever. 
And it settled in my head." — Ex. 

Professor — "What works of Scott have 
3'ou read ?" 

Student — "I think I've read Scott's 
Emulsion." — Ex. 

"The college men are very slow 
They seem to take their ease. 
)For even when they graduate 
They take it by degrees." — Ex. 

"Governor Woodrow Wilson is em- 
inently fitted to apply a remedy to our 
political ills. He is an authority on 
government who is recognized the 
world over. He, more than any other 
man in .\merica, has at his fingers' 
ends an expert knowledge of the prin- 
ciples and details of practical govern- 
ment and has a serious and earnest 
desire to correct the misusages of the 
present and past. Lincoln-like, he be- 
lieves in the supremacy of the opinion 
of the people. He resents with all the 
vigor at his command the conduct of 
government for the benefit of any spe- 
cial interest." The Perkiomenite. 

We thank our co-laborers for the 



following words of commendation : 
"Our College Times holds its rank as 
a school journal among our present 
Exchanges." — Red and Black. 

"Our College Times shodld be con- 
gratulated upon the neat appearance 
of its new cover." 

—Albright Bulletin. 

"Our College Times contains many 
articles of literary excellence. We 
would suggest that our students read 
'Factors Producing an Ideal Educa- 
tion.' The author shows in eloquent 
language, that to attain an ideal edu- 
cation is not only to develop the mind, 
and that in struggling for mental edu- 
cation we should never forget the phys- 
ical and spiritual part of ourselves. 
The author of 'Pan in Wall Street, 
makes an appeal to man to develop 
the aesthetic qualities along with the 
practical. For neatness and good ar- 
rangement your paper may serve as a 
model." M. H. Aerolith. 

The following exchanges have been 
received since the last issue: — Al- 
bright Bulletin, College Life, College 
Rays, College Folio, The Collegian, 
College Student, Dickinsonian, Dela- 
ware College Review, Friendship Ban- 
ner, The Gettysburgian, Linden Hall 
Echo, Lordsburg College Educator, M. 
H. Aerolith. Juniata Echo, The Red 
Man, Washington Collegian, Red and 
Black, Purple and White, Carlisle Ar- 
row. Shamokin High School Review, 
The Perkiomenite, The Owl, The Tar- 
gum, Western Maryland College 
Monthly, The Signal, Rays of Light, 
Mercury, Philomathean Monthly. Urs- 
inus Weekly, Purple and Gold, Tempe 
Normal Student, Normal Quarterly. 
—Ex. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 




Alumni Notes 

WHEN we think of the many- 
graduates of Elizabethtown 
College who are at present so- 
journing in Philadelphia and vicinity 
the question arises in our mind: — 
Why not organize a Philadelphia 
branch of the Alumni Association of 
our school? Here are the addresses of 
the persons referred to above: — El- 
mer Ruhl, '08, and Linneaus Earhart, 
'10, both students at the University of 
Penna.; Daisy P. Rider, '10, student 
at Philadelphia School of Design ; Hen- 
ry Garman, '04, stenographer, 41 N. 
10th St. ; Isaac Z. Hackman, teacher 
in Philadelphia Business College; Vi- 
ola Withers, '09, student at Comb's 
Conservatory of Music ; Elizabeth A. 
Zortman, '06, who entered the Munici- 
pal Hospital on Sept. 30, to pursue a 
six months' Post Graduate Course in 
contagious diseases ; Floy S. Croutha- 
mel, Souderton ; Kathryn T. Moyer, 
Lansdale ; Geo. H. Light, Hatfield. 

Among those who have not gradu- 
ated but have been former students 
are: — Orca Z. Miller, who is assist- 
ant matron at the Burd School, 63rd 
and Walnut Sts. ; and Emma Buck- 
waiter, who is taking a course of train- 



ing in Nursing at the University of 
Penna.; Mary Cassel of Lansdale; 
Anna and Carrie Cassel of Hatfield; 
Marie Grater, Carrie Ellis and E. F. 
Nedrow of Norristown. And there 
may be others whom we failed to men- 
tion. 

Now if a program were arranged to 
be rendered at a certain place in Phil- 
adelphia, and if all of these persons 
were urged to attend, what an inspir- 
ing meeting might be held ! And what 
an advertisement for our College these 
meetings would be. 

Then too, several members of the 
Faculty could be placed on the pro- 
gram. Who would not rejoice to be 
in the presence of the teachers whom 
v\e have learned to love, and whose 
wholesome advice and instruction have 
had such great influence on our lives 
and helped to make us what we are. 

The wife of Mr. C. S. Livengood, 
'06, spent several days, recently in 
Elizabethtown. Mr. Livengood has 
two fine daughters, Martha and Mary. 
Everyone remembers C. S. as being 
full of jokes and wit and the elder, 
Martha, has unmistakable evidences 
of his characteristics. 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



W'e are glad to have Mr. Henry 
Sheaffer, "10, again as a student for the 
remainder of the year. 

Mr. W. K. Gish, '10, spent part of 
Sunday, Dec. 17, with his brother, 
who is undergoing an operation at the 
Medico Chirurgical Hospital, Phila. 

We are informed that on December 
14, Mr. H. L. Smith, '09, took to him- 
self as the enriches of his life, and de- 
voted companion in all his labor. Miss 
Katie Burkholder of California. No 
doubt he is at present spending his 
honeymoon on the shores of the Paci- 
fic. We extend our best wishes and 
heartiest congratulations to Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith. 



The Typewriter Industry 

A-\IOXG the many American in- 
dustries which distribute their 
products throughout the world 
and lead the old industrial nations of 
Europe in size and importance, none 
is more typical of the aggressiveness 



and success of the American commer- 
cial spirit than the typewriter industry. 
It is stated upon competent authority 
that 90 per cent, of the typewriters used 
in the civilized world are made in the 
United States. Notwithstanding the 
large and growing market for type- 
writers in England, Germany and 
France, countries numbering in their 
population many skilled industrial 
workers, the fact remains that the peo- 
ple of these countries use American 
typewriters to a larger extent than ever 
before, although for several years for- 
eign manufacturers have had machines 
on the market and have competed vig- 
orously at home and abroad. 

While typewriters were originally 
designed for regular correspondence, 
they are today used for all classes of 
tabulating, statistical and accounting 
work, so that many corporations use 
from four to ten times more type- 
writers in this work than they use for 
corrjspondence. 



50 N. QUEEN ST. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

s us to give you th" bes 

luality at prices most r( 
WATCH ES. Our ranee in price is from $150 to $1.00. 
CLOCKS. From $300 chime clocks to the alarm clock at 85 cents. 
EYE-GLASSES and SFECTACLES fitted to the eyes with no charge for exami.-ation. 
Our Manufacturing and Repairing Department cannot be excelled in Pennsylvania. Everything is 
le in our own shop, by jur own workmen— You are always welccme at look's Jewelry Stere. 



D. Walter Miesse 

The College and School Photographer 

INDIVIDUAL AND CROUP 

PORTRAITS 



Bell Telephone 290J 

24 WEST KING STREET, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 
GEO. R. KERSEY i^ 



27 



9 College Jewelry of the Better Sorl 



DENTIST 



ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

TOOTH BRUSHES, FLESH BRUSHES, 
SPONGES, Etc. 

A. W. CAIN 

WE DO IT RIGHT 



Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES CBb SON 



A. R. LEICHT 

Manufaotarer of FmeVehlcleS 

Repainting and Repair Work Given Careful Attention 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



LEO KOB I 
Heating and | 

JPlumbing | 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. | 

,,,... ..,,.,■■...,., J,,.* 

FRANK H. KELLER 

Dealer In Fancy and Staple Groceries 
Provisions, Etc. 

Our Highest Ambition to Please You. 



BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO SUPPLIES FOR SALE 
Centre Square 



G.Wm.REISNER 

Manufacturing 
Jeweler 

Class Pins and Rings Prize Caps 

Fraternity Jewelry Medals 

LANCASTER, PA. 

lilllllBllliailllBIIIIBIIIIIBIIIIBIIilBIIIB!li:iBlin«llini:iBlllBIII!ltfl|. 

F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 
GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 

HORSESHOEING A SPECIALTY 
North Market Street- ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

J. CROFF & SONS 

Meat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 




4» Those who are judges of good Ice Cream say that J 

I Miesse's Ice Cream I 

* is the most Delicious and Satisfying J 

^ thev bave eaten. Try it for yourself j, 

4| We serve Parties, Weiiilings, Dinners ^ 

* and Receptions with cakes and ice cream 4> 
with perfect satisfaction. * 

D. W. MIESSE, 123 N. Quoen St., Lancaster f 

Ice Cream sold in Elizabethtown by J. C. Gross •!• 



UP TO DATE 

Shaving and Hair Cutting 

R. H. SHISSLER. 

Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions CareluIIy Compounded 



28 Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 

I/. E. BELSER 



2 For Koofine, Spouting, Tin and 

^ Granite Ware, Milk Cans, Radi- 

« ators. Portable Furnaces, Granite 

^ Lisk Roasters lo four sizes, or 

^ any special orders in my line. 

* Give me a trial. 



First-Class Shoe Rjjepairing 

Work Onaramteed Pricra Reasonable 

RUBBER HEELS make WALKING EASY 
JOHN C. BERBEAIAN, E. High St. 



2 Opp E;:change Bank S 

« ELIZABETHTOVVN, - PENNA. » 



Weddings and Parties supplied 
Fancy Cakes at short notice. 



$ S. MARKET ST 



Ih. .h BRANDT \ 

\ Dealer in % 

♦ ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL ♦ 

♦ SLATE and ROOFING PAPER J 

I I 

^ Elizabcthtown, - - Penna. T 

E. L. RENSEL 

y General Blacksinithing 

* and Repair Work 
ELIZABETHTOVVN, PA ^ Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

* Park St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



I W. A. Ashenfelter | 

I CHOICE BREAD AND * 

« CAKES % 



ith 



Plain Snits, Ready-Made or Ordered, at 

ADOLPH GANSMAN'S 

Clothier 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orangs St:., Lancaster, Pa 
ELIZABETHTOWN 

Dental Parlors 

S. J. HEINDEL, Dentist. 
■\a*n Touring Car 




♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦I »4 

X ELIZABETHTOWN % 

X ROLLER MILLS: 

X 3. P. BINKLEV, Propr. 2 

X Manufacturer of Best Grades ol ♦ 
X FLOUR AND FEED ♦ 

4 Hig!-est Cash Prices paid for grain, Z 

♦ hay and straw # 

♦ ELIZABETHTOWN, - PEX\A « 

5 AND lOc STORE 

Let us make your Nickels, I>imes and 
tiuarters dodoulile duty. Nothing in the store 
is priced more than 10c and from that down. 
M. W. ESHENOWER 



ELIZABETHTOWN. 



PENNA. 



John A. Fisher 



Fully Equipped at Above Prices 
Call on or Address 

S. NEWCOMER, - Mt. Joy, Pa. 



BARBER 



Centre Square. 



Elizabethtown. Pa. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



Chas. R. Boggs, Restaurant 

First-Class cTVIeals at All Hours 



Oysters In Season 



Confectionery", Ice Cream 



I S. G. HERSHET | 

I Groceries, Dry | 
J Goods and { 

I Notions I 

I ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. J 



JACOB HSHER 

Watchmaker & Jeweler 

■Center Square, Elizabethtown, Penna. 

With you for ai years. That's All 



Bell and Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers In 

New and Old Books 

East Orange St., Lancaster, Pa 

CHOICE MEATS 

A. K. Young 

EMZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



For All Kinds of 
FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & McBride 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PE^ 




Hours 8 to 6 



DR. JEROME G. HESS 
DENTIST 



Hertzler Bldg. 
Elizabethtown Pa. 




Ebersole & Baney 

Dealers in 
Choice Groceries. Fine Grade of Teas and 

Coffees, Fresh Country Butter and Eggs 
Bell Phone ElizabeUitoAvn, Penna 



Grover Hefflefinger 

Shoes Repaired Shoes Shined 

Hats Cleaned 

S. Market St. ELIZABETHTOAVN, PA. 




For Up-to-Date 

Furnishings 



I. D. 
BENEMAN'S 

Depl. Store 
MT, JOY, - PA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of if our Patronage. 



THE "ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD'' 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year Sample Copies Free 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 



ElilZABETHTOWN, 



H, K. OBER 

Notary Public 

Snrvejror and Conveyancer 
Elizabethtown, - - Penna. 



GUY COCHNAUER'S 

Up-to-Date Shaving Parlor 

South Market St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

CENTRAL MEAT MARKET 

All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



H. H. GOOD 



ELIZABETHTOWN 



Poorman's Bakery 

Choice Bread, Roils & Cakes 

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EDITORIAL STAFF 



Elizabeth Myer Editor-in-Uhief 

W. K. Gish, '14 School Notes 

Mamie Keller, '12 Society News 

Levi Ziegler, '13 Society News 

W. F. Eshelman, '12 Exchanges 

Leah M. Sheatfer, '09. Alumni Editor 

Ralph VV. Schlosser, '11 Business Manager 

Daisy P. Rider, '10 Art Editor 



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Knighthood of To-Day. 



H. K. Eby, '14 



WE have reached that age in 
civiHzation when it becomes 
our duty to weigh the prob- 
lem of our knighthood. In doing so 
we are forced to look at the results 
rooted and grounded by ancient chiv- 
alry, in order to make manifest more 
vividly the conditions of to-day and 
to compare the modern spirit of man 
with the spirit of chivalry. 

In the year 1270 Louis IX of 
France and Edward 1 of England, at 
the head of a large army of European 
knights set out upon a perilous jour- 
ney to the Holy Land to make one 
more attempt to capture the secret 
sepulchre from the hands of the infi- 
del. Seven years later Edward 1 was 
carried wounded and bleeding before 
the ragged remnant of his army de- 
feated and repulsed from the firm 
walls of Jerusalem. It was the last 
crusade. It was the final manifesta- 
tion of the enthusiasm which prevailed 
in Europe centuries upon centuries 
and had caused men, women, and chil- 
dren in countless thousands to meet 
death by famine, fever and sword. We 
cannot fail to see the weakness of this 
\tMovement, for its strange mingling 
of motives, its cruelty yet gentleness, 
its distant performances to the neglect 
of friends at home, were all hindrances 
in its unsuccessful progress. 

However, we must recognize its 
grandeur and the fact that beneath its 
fallacies lie principles which are as im- 
perishable as the soul. This craze for 



the sepulchre was a part of the world's 
blind striving after a right ideal, and 
the knight facing his enemy unwaver- 
ingly without reproach was an image 
of the Christ unfolded by an emotional 
and romantic people because of a faint 
knowledge of our eternal God. It was 
an awakening to a real meaning of 
life — to attain a spotless character, to 
live a stainless career, to fight for the 
weaklings, and relieve the oppressed 
from torture, pain and grief to real liv- 
ing. This momentary vision of such an 
ideal was an invaluable impetus to 
every rational creature in the universe. 

This spirit of chivalry has passed 
away and has become the heritage of 
history and thought. All its pride and 
dignity have died away; its warfare is 
partially forgotten ; and its chief aims 
seem childish and vain. Is nothing 
then left of this valor but its name, 
which represents a vague dream of ro- 
mantic and remote tenderness? 

Today we are in an age of tremen- 
dous unrivaled progress in science, 
industry and art, and especially in an 
age in which humanitarian ideas are 
fostered by many. It is true that with 
these accomplishments man}' seem to 
rest easy in their conscience that God's 
design has been achieved up to this 
time and that civilization has been per- 
fected. In the midst of this bright 
picture we are nourishing doubt and 
unbelief from which will dawn an 
alarming and bitter awakening. The 
sounds of science and civilization are 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



rising and blending in exquisite har- 
mony while the mournful, depressed 
and discordant cry of God's poor are 
in darkness and hindered from the path 
of progress. 

We are clearly conscious that these 
sufferings are not due to errors but to 
wrongs ; not to the weak and the suff- 
erer, but to the yearning greed and 
foolish negHgence of their brothers. 

It is not true that the prevalent cus- 
tom of society in dealing with such 
tendencies is to let them alone? Man 
says, "Allow such conditions to take 
care of themseh-es and as civilization 
grows these will be eliminated." But, 
sorrowfully, the weaker classes are al- 
ways and ever will be deprived of 
being unlocked from their abyss of su- 
perstition, the exponent of ignorance, 
unless man awakens to his duty. 

However, from this method of ne- 
glect for the elimination of such 
conditions a more direct solution arises 
which goes to the very core with shiv- 
ering and amazing results. There is a 
time when that burning sense of in- 
justice becomes hotter and hotter until 
the social mind of the weak causes the 
best of nations to be demolished. 
China did not answer to the oppressed, 
but was indifferent and seemed help- 
less. Now rebellion is taking ven- 
geance and in due time China will 
answer to the sufferer's "I can't help." 
Other nations are in similar circum- 
stances. America is one of them. 

Shall we be negligent or shaP. we 
lift the poor from the circuit of the 
same endless and narrow round? We 
have the opportunity to avoid destruc- 
tion and to revive the old spirit of 



awakening but with deeper seated and 
more far-reaching results than before. 
Those of us who have been dubbed 
under the knighthood of the twentieth 
century must put away all fancy and 
parade. W^e must lift the helpless. We 
must recognize the brotherhood and 
and interdependence of mankind and 
splendor and dignity of service. We 
must foster a free and living principle 
to save man in order not to have his 
path spotted with the horrors of war 
but marked with the joy of peace. We 
must bring all to one plane which 
means universal education, prosperity 
and honor. 

Ideal education must not only ad- 
vance principles but it must develop 
men to uphold them and insure an ab- 
solute obedience to moral and Chris- 
tian laws. Until education is directed 
to eliminate greed, instead of satisfy- 
ing the belligerent spirit of man, these 
problems will be solved only by the 
sword. Youth must be taught to de- 
spise the toils of war; they must learn 
to be merciful and love peace; neither 
can they afford to spend their courage 
in adventure, but they must learn to 
serve mankind in all humility. 

Friends, when this end is accom- 
plished there will be no need to fear 
the future. In the struggle that is sure 
to come, we shall not lack warriors; 
we shall not lack heroes ; and if need 
be, martyrs. Thus, only, shall we be 
preserved from the extreme folly of 
solving disputes by the bloody sword. 
Thus, only, shall we have enlisted 
properly and fully under this the 
knighthood of the twentieth century. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Enoch Arden 



Elizabeth Kline, '13 



THE fact that this narrative has 
been written, as Wordsworth 
says, by one of the greatest 
poets, is sufficient reason to arouse 
our interest in the poem. Tennyson, 
unlike many other poets, had great 
confidence in humanity. He believed 
that love, truth, fidelity, and beauty 
existed in the hearts of men, and for 
this reason his pictures of life are al- 
most ideal. We may account for this 
faith from the fact that the great poet 
was exceedingly shy and "morbidly 
reticent," and thus shrank from con- 
tact with the world at large. He 
knew only the sympathy and friend- 
ship of the tried and chosen few, and 
well might he give us this beautiful 
picture of fidelity and love. The key- 
note of the story is the strength of 
human love, and so wonderfully is it 
told that the doubts of the most scep- 
tical fade and leave the reader with a 
greater degree of confidence in human- 
ity. 

The scene is laid in a little fishing 
village. Here, day after day, three 
children, Annie Lee, Philip Ray, and 
Enoch Arden played together. Their 
favorite play was housekeeping, and 
their most common quarrel was who 
would be master. 

"Rut when the dawn of rosy child- 

.\nd the new warmth of life's as- 
cending sun 

Was felt by either, either fixt his 
heart 

On that one girl." 

Finally, Enoch won her and Philip 



was left alone. They lived happily 
for a time, but because of some 
misfortune, that grim monster, Pov- 
erty, stepped in and threatened the 
destruction of their little home. 
Through the kindness of a friend. 
Enoch received employment on a ves- 
sel bound for China. After fitting up 
a little store in their home by which 
Annie and the three children might 
earn a livelihood, he left them. Ten 
long years slipped by ; but no news 
from Enoch. During this time Annie 
became quite poor and Philip who 
was wealthy ofifered to assist her by 
educating her children. She reluct- 
antly, consented and Philip thus kept a 
watchful eye over the little family. 

Enoch was quite successful in dis- 
tant China, and long before this, had 
started for home with his little for- 
tune. However the vessel encountered 
a heavy storm, and he, with his two 
companions was stranded on an island. 
Soon afterwards his companions died, 
and after years of solitude he was res- 
cued by a passing vessel and taken to 
his home. 

Having heard nothing through all 
these years his family thought he was 
dead : and Philip, the ardent lover of 
tlieir childhood days, won Annie's 
'heart and married her. Enoch, so 



nized in his home town ; and when he 
went back to their little home, he 
found it deserted. Upon inquiry he 
was directed to the home of Philip 
Ray and here, through the darkness, 
he looked into the well-lighted room 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



and saw the rival of his boyhood as 
the father of his family. 
Broken-hearted but noble-hearted, 
"He therefore turning softly like a 

thief, 
Crept to the gate, opened it, and 

came out upon the waste." 
His anguish will be best understood 
in his own words : 

"To hard to bear ! why did they take 

me thence? 
O God Almighty, blessed Saviour, 

Thou 
That didst uphold me on my lonely 

isle 
Uphold me, Father, in my loneliness 
A little longer; aid me, give me 

strength 
Not to tell her, never to let her 

know. 



Help me not to break in upon her 
peace." 

His desire was granted, for the facts 
were not told until after his death. 

A certain writer compares this poem 
with the old Corinthian ornateness, 
and we must agree that it is beautiful- 
ly adorned and ornamented. Tenny- 
son here clearly shows that he is a poet 
of art, for one cannot but be impressed 
with the refinement and high finish of 
this poem. Again we note the grace, 
melody, and ease in the structure of 
his verse, and this makes the poem ex- 
ceedingly attractive and charming. 
The poem can be summed up in the 
words of a writer who says: "The 
rough edges and sharp angles of fact 
are softened, and life is seen through 
a golden haze of meditative beauty." 



The Bible Term 



Sermon by Eld. Galen B. Royer 

Jan. 1-1 — Subject — "Blessings of 
Obedience," Text, Ps. 144:15. 

Notes : — Obedience brings happi- 
ness. Many of us seek happiness. We 
have a right to be happy. Those who 
give themselves to God's Service are 
happy. Satan does not give us true 
happiness in this life or in the life to 
come. The Sinner may seemingly be 
happy, but it is not true joy. Noth- 
ing disturbs the soul that trusts in 
God. Trial is the test of obedience. 

Partial obedience does not bring 
complete happiness. Love seeks op- 
portunity to manifest itself to those 
in whom we trust. Partial obedience 
brings in-subordination. Human au- 



thority does not desire partial subordi- 
nation. The Sailor must have abso- 
lute obedience and authority for 
safety. 

Obedience by subsitution is found 
in the perfect life of Jesus Christ. 
Through the work of the Holy Spirit 
in our life we may give complete obe- 
dience. 

Jan. 15 — Subject — "Great Faith." 
Text, Matt. 15:28. 

Jesus had secretly withdrawn to 
Phonicia. He did not want to be made 
known, but this woman heard of him 
and came beseeching him to heal her. 
We know nothing further of the wo- 
man. Her coming is mysterious, 
so also is His dealing with her. Tt> 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



us she appears as very earnest ant; 
■-incere. We see her persistent in:- 
ploraion. He recognizes her, but 
£ay^. "It is not meet to give the chil- 
dren's bread to dogs." She says yes, 
1)Ut the dogs eat of the crumbs thai 
full from the table." She recognizes 
her position, but hungers for ev'cn 
w'lat she may have. 

Msy the Apostles have needed a 
s.rong example of faith and Jesus 
Lnew he would find it in this woman? 
May this have been at least one rea- 
son for him to have dealt thus with 
this woman? • 

We do not trust enough. How 
much do we trust beyond what we 
have in sight? 

Are we satisfied to recognize our po- 
sition to the extent that we may re- 
ceive the blessing? 

Are we as parents concerned about 
our children as this mother was? The 
Love of Jesus is greater than the 
Mother Love. 

Jan. 16 — Subject — ''Peace be unto 
you." Text, Lk. 24:36. 

It is said that in the Alps Moun- 
tains, there are passes or gorges hun- 
dreds of feet deep. Falling into one 
of these means death. The guides 
who conduct tourists in these moun- 
tains, leap across these chasms, then 
kneel on the other side and the tour- 
ist places one foot in the hand of the 
guide and thus leaps across after them. 
Thev must have implicit trust in the 
: -.litlc ;o i'.;r..-. fo'.lv.v.- him. .\fter the 
Resurrection the Disciples were slow 
to believe that the Master had risen. 
They could not comprehend that Jes- 
us had burst the bars of the grave. 
The nail prints in his hand was his 
proof to them that he had risen. It 



was through the death on the Cross 
that Jesus spanned the chasm and 
now reaches to us and bids us have 
faith in him as a guide. He wants 
us to be reconciled to God and obtain 
the "peace which passeth all under- 
standing." The ocean bird rides on 
the huge billows and is in peace, so 
we may be in peace, by fixing our 
trust and faith on Him. 

Jan. 17 — Subject — "The Difficulty 
of Doubting." Text, John 20:27. 

The Resurrection was a complete 
victory. It is the most important vic- 
. tory ever won. After the Crucifixion 
there was a period of darkness, until 
the tomb was made empty. The dis- 
ciples received the news with open 
hearts except Thomas. He could not 
believe the report of the ten and 
said he would not believe unless he 
placed his fingers in the nail prints 
and the wound in his side. Thomas 
was a loving, ardent man, but he was 
a pessimist. This is characteristic of 
him as we see him in different in- 
stances. Elijah too, was pessimistic, 
when he thought he was the only one 
of God's Servants. Do we think too 
that the Church and all is lost when 
individuals go astray? Thomas could 
not believe beyond his sight. Do we 
too demand a faith (sight) to reach 
to heaven before we accept? Doubt 
is the enemy of the day. Will we 
continue to live in the doubt side of 
life or on the faith and hope side? 

Jan. 19 — .-"^ubjcc; — ".\ Mc. ".;^c of 
Service." Text, John 21:6. 

We have here the account of the 
great draught of fishes after the Res- 
urrection. Jesus carried with him a 
preciousness after he had conquored 
death, hell and the grave. It was in 



OUR COLLE'GE TIMES 



13 



Galilee that Jesus accomplished his 1st 
great work in his ministerial work, so 
he again goes to Galilee to perform 
this miracle after the Resurrection. 
It was after he had had two meeting 
in Jerusalem after his resurrection. 

Peter had concluded to go to his 
former occupation. It required more' 
faith on Peter's part to go fishing 
than to sit down and wait. What 
dignity bestowed on labor — this great 
Apostle, called to help launch the 
great church, goes to his former oc- 
cupation. 

This second draught of fishes was 
taken after Jesus was in a glorified 
state, the first was in his natural state. 
Jesus asks the disciples what success. 
The answer came "no success." So 
also before the fiood there was no suc- 
cess. In the wilderness, at Sinai, God 
realized no fruits from his people — 
"no fish." In the Church to-day we 
must too frequently respond, "no fish." 
In the individual we find the same re- 
sfionse. The person is utterly help- 
less to results without God. We need 
Jesus Christ to direct our fishing as 
he tenderly dealth with these disciples. 
His instruction was simple — "Cast the 
net on the right side." The boats are so 
constructed that the right side of the 
boat were the improbable waters, but 
by his direction and authority the great 
draught of fishes came from the most 
improbable side of the boat. So to- 
day we are to cast the net into the 



seemingly unfruitful waters. A com- 
forting thought comes that although 
we toil all night, yet he feeds us. After 
the earnest toil he has a feast prepared 
for us. There is no such feast prepared 
for those who are not in Christ Jesus. 

Jan. 20— Subject— "The Message of 
Power." Matt. 28:20. 

When this message was given the 
Master's work was complete. He had 
come into the world without power. 
Now he is sovereign. He had con- 
quered all. His meetings with the dis- 
ciples became very sacred. The place 
undoubtedly became very Sacred to 
them. Our place of communion with 
God becomes very sacred to us. It 
is there that we obtain power with 
God. His power becomes our pro- 
tection. The Gospel becomes a power 
to every one that believeth. The pow- 
ers of earth are insignificant in com- 
parison with that of Jesus Christ. He 
is my strength and I'm dead to sin — 
Rom. 8:34. 

After he had conquored then he said 
to his disciples "Go." This commis- 
sion is world-wide, to all nations, ton- 
gues and religions. We are to be bap- 
tized into the name (nature) of Fath- 
er, Son and Holy Spirit. Have we 
much of the nature of the Trinity! 
Our growth depends on our "abiding 
in Him." Just to the extent that he 
leads us holding our hand have we 
His strength and power. Those out of 
Christ do not have this power. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




Winter 

Wintry winds are blowing, 
Trees are bare, — 'tis snowing, 
Beneath the drifts the flowers are bur- 
ied deep. 

But in their icy dwelHng 
Little brooks are telling 
That winter is but springtime fast 
asleep. — Selected. 



Of armed strength: his pure and 
might}- heart. 

Richard W. Gilder. 



In this issue of Our College Times 
the editor submits most of the space 
usually devoted to editorials to reports 
and items of interest concerning the 
Bible Term. 



February 22nd. 

Welcome, thou festal morn ! 
Never be passed in scorn 

Thy rising sun, 
Thou day forever bright 
With freedom's holy light, 
That gave the world the sight, 

Of Washington. — Selected. 

Abraham Lincoln 

Yes, this is he who ruled a world of 
men, 

As might some,, prophet of the el- 
der day, 

Brooding above the tempest and the 
fray 

With deep-eyed thought and more 
than mortal ken, 

A power was his beyond the touch of 
art 



The Bible Term 

THE Bible Term which began 
on Thursday, Jan. 11, at 9 o'- 
clock and closed Jan. 21, was 
une of the greatest in interest and at- 
tendance ever held at Elizabethtown 
College. 

Eld. Galen Royer came in on Wed- 
nesday already, as did several others. 
Eld. Royer is now and has been for 
years Secretary of the General Mission 
Board and his knowledge of, and close 
touch with, the work of our Mission- 
aries in India, China, Sweeden and 
France, as well as with those in the 
home countr)'-, adds special interset to 
his efforts as teacher and preacher at 
a Bible Term. Before beginning his 
sermons on several evenings, he read 
to us letters or announced news and 
greeting from our friends at a distance. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



The letter from Brother and Sister J. 
F. Graybill now in Sweden, and greet- 
ings from Brethren D. L. Miller then 
in California, and J. G. Royer, teach- 
ing at Bible Term in North Manches- 
ter College, Indiana, were especially 
interesting. Our hearts were sadden- 
ed, however, with the news of the 
drowning of Prof. Fahnestock of Mc- 
Pherson, Kansas. 

Elder J. Kurtz Miller taught John's 
Epistles and other Great Bible Chap- 
ters with the vim that is characteris- 
tic of the man. J. H. Keller taught 
from St. Mark; Jesse Ziegler, taught 
on "Prayer" during the 11.20 period; 
Samuel Hertzler gave lessons from 
the Book of Romans; Prof. H. K. 
Ober on Sunday School Pedagogy; 
and Miss Lydia Stauflfer on the 
Psalms. Misses Kathryn Miller and 
Elizabeth Kline conducted the Music 
classes during the Bible Term. 

The Chapel Exercises during the 
Bible Term were conducted on the 
different mornings by the following 
Bible students or teachers:- — Jan. 11, 
Eld. Galen B. Royer; Jan. 12, Eld. Jes- 
se Ziegler; Jan. 15, Levi Mohler ; 
Jan. 16^ Eld. j. Kurtz Miller; Jan. 17, 
Amos Kuhns ; Jan. 18, Nathan Mar- 
tin ; Jan. 19, P. M. Habecker. 

Eternity alone can reveal the far 
reaching influences of the Bible Term. 
Some of the immediate results were 
the conversion of three souls, and the 
consecration of two young brethren 
(now students here) to the Mission 
field. 

Three ministers from the Mechanic- 
grove Congregation, were in attend- 
ance at the Bible Term. What if 
each congicgcition in Eastern Pennsyl- 
van-a would send us as good a repre- 



sciiuitive as this for our next Bible 
■ crni? 

Among those who responded when 
caiitd upon by Dr. Reber for an ex- 
pression of appreciation of the help re- 
ceived while attending this Bible 
Term, were the following: — Rufus 
Bucher (by paper) ; M. G. Gibble, 
Aaron C. Reber, Eld. S. H. Hertzler, 
B. Mary Royer, W. G. Group, S. S. 
Miller, John Zug, Mazie Martin Gish, 
Lydia Stauffer, Kathryn Miller, Eld. 
Galen Royer, Eld. Jesse Ziegler and 
Eld. J. Kurtz Miller. 



We note with sorrow the death of 
Bessie Horst's mother which occur- 
red on January 18th. We extend to 
her and other bereaved friends our 
sincerest sympathy, and commend 
them to God. who alone can heal the 
heart that's broken. 



Educational Program 
On Saturday afternoon, Jan. 13,. 
at 2 p. m., a large audience gathered 
in the College Chapel, to hear the 
Educational program of the Special 
Bible term. The calling to order by 
the Moderator, Prof. Ober, was fol- 
lowed by the Invocation b}' Eld. Jesse 
Ziegler of Royersford, Pa. The next 
was music, "Life's Dream" by a Lad- 
ies' Quartet, Misses Miller, Sheaflfer, 
Wolgemuth and Kline. Eld. J. Kurtz 
!\Iiller, of Brooklyn, N. Y., then spoke 
of the "Educational Need in the 
Church." He showed the need of prep- 
aration, especially on the part of the 
Minister, Missionary, S. S. Superinten- 
dent, and Sunday School teacher. He 
said that the apparent need of an edu- 
cation depends largely upon the angle 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



from which we view the subject, and 
that the demand today is for men who 
are leaders and thinkers and can use 
what they know, and know where to 
reach for what they want. Xhe Male 
Quartet, Messrs. Kulp, Gish, Shank 
and Holsinger. sang "Daddy" after 
which Dr. Stahr, ex-president of 
Franklin and Marshall College dis- 
cussed "Education for Service." He 
said that education is a nourishing and 
tempering process, the value of which 
depends largely upon the motive 
of getting. He emphasized strongly 
the statement that the mind must be 
harmoniously developed and that no 
person is truly educated unless he or 
she has given God a prominent place in 
his or her life. 

■"Onward Christian Soldiers" was 
"then sung by a mixed octette — Misses 
Kathryn Miller. Leah Sheaffer, Eliza- 
beth Kline and Anna Wolgemuth and 
Messrs W. K. Gish, R. W. Schlosser, 
J. G. Myer. W. E. Glasmire.— Re- 
ported by \'. C. H. 

Sunday School Program 

The Sunday School Program ren- 
dered Jan. 14th., was most interesting 
and the audience was large and appre- 
ciative. Miss Keller read a very fine 
paper on the Value of Organizing a 
Sunday School Class. Eld. G. B. Royer 
presented Methods of Interesting the 
Indifferent. He showed by examples 
how necessary it is to find the "point 
of contact." D. V. Shank emphasized 
the fact that lack of preparation and 
wrong methods of presentation are 
some of the Most Serious Mistakes of 
the Teacher. "The Graded Lesson 
System for the Primary Department" 



was discussed by Lydia Stauffer, after 
which a few minutes were devoted to 
general questions and remarks. New 
thoughts were suggested to church 
workers wh'ch they will do well to 
practice. — Reported by W. K. G. 

Mission and Temperance Work 

The Missionary and Temperance 
meeting constituting a part of this 
year's Bible Term was held Saturday, 
Jan. 20th., with Trof. R. W. Schlosser 
as moderator. 

J. B. Asper of Mechanicsburg stated 
that in order to do aggressive temper- 
ance work in the local congregations 
we must sow the seeds of temperance 
in the hearts of the young, just as be- 
fore the Civil \\'ar anti-slavery senti- 
ment was implanted by voice and pen 
in the minds of the rising generation. 
Children who are persuaded to sign 
the pledge will as a rule be found to 
have honored the pledge. Christians 
must vote for temperance. They must 
unite and organize. 

^Irs. Mazie Gish urged that each 
congregation should have a mission 
study class. She stated that there 
should be weekly meetings of this 
class, good preparation and deep earn- 
estness. To know the needs of missions 
is to long to help. The study makes 
worldly Christians spiritual. So it may 
come to pass that, because of the 
spiritual quickening which Christians 
experience, by the time the church has 
saved the heathen, the heathen will 
in a sense have saved the church. 

Elder Galen B. Royer in his discus- 
sion on "Our Greatest Needs in Mis- 
sion Work," said that our greatest 
need is a praying church. Our praying 
should be direct and specific. There 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



are more women consecrated for the 
work than men. 

The College Hill quartet sang "Day 
is Dying in the West." An oflfering 
was taken for missions amounting to 
Reported by J. H. 

THE SPRING TERM 
Reorganization of Classes 

DURING the Spring Term 
which opens on March 25th, 
many new classes will be 
College Times 9. 

formed that will be of special interest 
to those who have been teaching. The 
term lasts twelve . weeks and offers 
advantages to prospective teachers and 
to regular teachers who have not 
ceased to grow professionally. Pupils 
from the Public Schools will be ac- 
commodated with work in the com- 
mon school branches suitable to their 
degree of advancement. College Pre- 
paratory students will find work that 
is suited to their needs conducted 
■during the Spring Term. 

The Faculty 

The standard of scholarship in thf- 
Faculty has been maintained during 
the past year. Although several ex- 
cellent teachers are no longer in the 
Faculty, yet those who have taken 
their places have proved very success- 
ful during the year thus far. Our 
teachers are not only thorough 
scholars, but also trained teachers, 
many of them having been graduated 
T)y the Normal School, College or 
:University. maintaining Pedagogical 
Courses. The Faculty is amply large 
to accommodate the many new stu- 
dents entering in the Spring Term. 



DEPARTMENTS 

Pedagogical. — The Pedagogical De- 
partment has been regularly main- 
tained for ten years and in this time 
has graduated several dozen students 
who have either continued their 
studies in College or else have suc- 
cessfully taught in Public Schools 
and in Township High Schools. The 
course has been enlarged to four years 
and is fully as strong as that offered 
by the Normal School. During the 
-Spring Term the following pedagogi- 
cal subjects will be taught: Elemen- 
tary Pedagogy, School Management, 
Genetic Psychology, Systems of Edu- 
cation, Ethics, and Philosophy of 
Teaching. 

English Scientific. — All the common 
school branches will be taught and 
such classes formed as will meet the 
needs of Public School pupils. Other 
studies such as Civics, Algebra, Amer- 
jican Literature, Drawing. General 
History will be taught. 

College Preparatory.! — Classes in 
Caesar, Cicero, Vergil as well as in the 
Elements of Latin, Geometry, EngHsh 
History, English Classics, Etymology, 
and Trigonometry will be conducted. 
Commercial. — The Commercial De- 
partment offers thoroughly revised and 
up-to-date courses necessary for a 
commercial education equal to the 
best. Classes in Bookkeeping, Com- 
mercial Arithmetic, Rapid Calculation, 
Commercial Law. Business Corres- 
pondence, Shorthand and Typewriting 
will be formed. 

Music. — The Music Department of- 
fers daih' instruction and practice in 
chorus singing and sight reading, Les- 
sons in Voice Culture, Harmony, 
Theory and History of Music, Piano 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



and Organ will be given at the usual 
prices. The' department is amply 
equipped with teachers and instru- 
ments and has maintained the high 
standard of work of former years. 

Industrial. — Elementary Agricul- 
ture will be taught for those who ex- 
pect to pursue an Agricultural Course 
as well as for those teachers of the 
Public Schools who will be required 
to teach it since the enactment of the 
School Code of Pennsylvania. 

Blible. — The College maintains a 
Regular Bible Department and offers 
a number of classes which meet daily 
in Bible study. All students are urged 
to take some study in the Bible De- 
partment. Classes in Mission study 
and Sunday School Normal work 
meet weekly. 

Expenses. ■ — Total expenses for 
boarding students during the Spring 
Term is fifty-five dollars. The ex- 
penses for day students for the term 
is eighteen dollars and fifty cents. 

.Additional Information. — The work 
done by the students during the 
Spring Term will count towards com- 
pleting the various courses. Anyone 
desiring to avail himself of the oppor- 
tunities afforded at Elizabethtown 
College for a practical education 
should write for the annual catalogue 
and engage room in the buildings by 
making early application to the Presi- 
dent. 

College Prayer Day 

FOR the first time in the his- 
tory of our College exercises 
appropriate to this dav were 



held in the College Chapel at 9.20 a. 
m.. on January 25. 

Pres. D. C. Reber discussed the 
"History and Purpose of the Day." 
He stated that last year in a certain 
college three sessions of speechmak- 
ing were held — morning, noon, and 
evening — for the purpose of impress- 
ing students with the importance of 
World Evangelization ; that this day 
is recommended to be observed in 
Christian Colleges in all countries. 
One year Ursinus College had for its 
theme on the observance of this day 
"World Peace." Dr. Reber spoke of 
the appropriateness of such a theme 
since there are pending in our United 
States Senate, bills concerning treat- 
ies of peace between this and other 
countries. 

Prof. H. K. Ober spoke on the ques- 
tion of "How may Christian Educa- 
tion be Promulgated, Universally, by 
a Day of Prayer?" Some of his re- 
marks were as follows : Leaders are 
needed in the world who pray. It is 
a mistake for leaders in any depart- 
ment of the world's work to look for 
power to any source lower than Christ, 
Himself. The real Christ life should 
exist among students and teachers in 
all Christian Colleges. If nations 
work as a united force, and bow to- 
gether in supplication to God for 
power asking that the Kingdom of 
Heaven may come upon the earth, 
what great results may we expect in 
accomplishing the evangelizafcton of 
the world? 

The meeting was closed with a sea- 
son of Special Prayer. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




ghoolNote^^.?^-' 







i^ 



Prof. Ober spent Jan. 22nd in Phila- 
■delphia, attending a meeting of the 
Orphanage Committee for Eastern 
District of Pa. Among the immediate 
results of this meeting was the de- 
cision to erect an Orphanage Building 
on the grounds of the Old Folks Home 
at Xefifsville, Pa. 

Students who have enrolled since 
Bible Term are, — Henry Heisey and 
John Bufifemyer of Rheems and 

College Notes 

All on College Hill were anxiously 
looking forward to Bible Term with its 
new interests, but when it was really 
upon us, attracting the student to a 
great extent from his regular work, 
we heard him almost gasping for 
breath under his increased load. Now 
that it is past, we delight in new ac- 
quaintances made and reflect on many 
lessons learned. 

It is not amiss to say that the in- 
terest shown throughout this session 
was deeper and more intense than in 
any previous term. The good evening 
attendance is proof enough that Eld. 
Royer's excellent sermons were ap- 
preciated. 

Because of the increased demand 
for instruction in Music, both in 



Voice and Piano, an additional teacher 
has been secured for that department. 
We are all glad to have Miss Eliza- 
beth Kline back again as one of the 
Faculty. The school also welcomed 
a number of new students who be- 
gan work after the Holiday vacation. 

Have you seen the colors and hap- 
py smiles ^the seniors wear? Why 
should they not be happy? On the 
night of January ninth the class held 
its term social. All spent an exceed- 
ingly pleasant and social evening. 
And then, think how they're running 
away with the high scores in Basket 
Ball.^ But, — Oh, you seniors! we'll 
get you yet" — Under Graduates. 
Rev. Z. A. Jones of the South Car- 
olina Normal and Industrial Institute 
lately paid a visit to College Hill. 

The Senior Class of Mt. Joy High 
School, taking advantage of the good 
sleighing on Jan. 11th, stopped at the 
College and visited the classes then 
in session. 

Whenever any of the Memorial 
boys referred to George's secret trips 
to Lancaster, he would always say, 
"Well, no remarks now, that's O K,— 
everything's O K." But imagine the 
surprise when later, the whole matter 
was revealed as H. K. and not O. K. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Prof, of Rhetoric — "Mr. Martin, de- 
fine exposition." After some hesitan- 
cy — "Well, what do you do when you 
recite a lesson?" 

Mr. Martin — "I expose myself." 

Prof. — "Yes, your knowledge or 
your ignorance." 

Es fehlte mir der Appetit zum Es- 
sen. "My appetite is not hungry" — 
Mr. Eby.' 

To the generosity and good will of 
Mr. Isaac Neflf* of Harrisburg, the 
boarding students and teachers are in- 
debted for some of the best fish ever 
served in the College Dining Hall. 

Mr. and J\Irs. Gish express their ap- 
preciation of the reception given them 
by the school on January tenth. A 
short and suitable program was ren- 
dered. We believe the evening was 
enjoyed by all, at least one spoke from 
the abundance of her heart." "Who'll 
be the next?"— Miss L. S. 

Our ne.xt Lecture will be given on 
February second by Byron Piatt. He 
has chosen for his subject, "American 
Morals." 

On P""riday forenoon, January 19th, 
a part of the regular school work was 
dispensed with and many Bible Term 
students addressed the school. Some 
expressed their appreciation of the ex- 
cellent teachings by the special Bible 
teachers ; some suggested how the 
Bible Term might be improved up- 
on and made still more profitable ; 
and others spoke more especially to 
the regular student body. 

We call upon the president of the 
Seniors to explain Mr. Christman's 
strange expression on the class photo. 

A question with which the students 
of psychology are grappling is: Why 



our grammar teacher in filling out a 
passing card for Mr. Landis, instead 
of placing her usual signature on it, 
really signed it Elizabeth Landis? A 
number of hypotheses have been of- 
fered but none have been satisfactory. 
These students hope to have an exact 
and psycholbgital explanation ready 
for the next issue. 

Homerian News 

The Homerian Literary Society ren- 
dered the following program on Fri- 
day afternoon, Jan. 19th: 

Prayer by the Chaplain. B. F. 
Waltz. 

Music— "Gay Little Butterfly" — 
Ladies Quartet. 

Oration — "Knighthood of today" — 
H. K. Eby. 

Reading — "The Death Bridge of the 
Tay" — Mamie B. Keller. 

Music — "Those Evening Bells" — 
Mixed Quartet 

Oration — "Freedom of the Will" — 
Laban W. Leiter. 

Extempore Speeches by Galen B. 
Royer and J. Kurtz iVIiller. 

Music — "Lullaby" — Quintet. 

Critic's Remarks b\' Prof. Ilarley. 

The officers for the new term are as 
follows : Speaker. Jacob E. Myers - 
Vice President. II. K. Eby: Chaplain. 
B. F. Waltz; Monitor. Prof. W. K. 
Gish : Recording Sec. Mamie B. Kel- 
ler: Critic. Prof. Jacob Harley. 

Can you think of an easier way to 

Society Notes 

.\nother year has come and gone 

and we a;c now wnr I'g the book t: 

1912. The Society being inspired \>y 

■ne work ^,or>e during the past yea- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



is striving to make this year the 
best in its history. The HoHday va- 
cation seems to have put new ambi- 
tion into all its members. 

On Jan. 5, an interesting program 
was renedered. Although the weather 
was very cold the attendance was 
fair. The chief features were: Essay, 
"Coal supply of Pennsylvania," by 
Ava Witmer; Extempore speech on 
"The White Slave Traffic," by W. K. 
Kulp ; two selections of music by the 
College Hill Quartette, consisting of 
Messrs. Kulp, Gish, Shank and Hol- 
singer. 

On Jan. 9, the following program 
was rendered : — 

Declamation — "Lincoln's Mother," 
Ira Coble ; Music — "Star of the Even- 
ing," College Hill Quartet; Debater- 
Resolved. That more benefit is derived 
from the study of science than from 



the study of language. It was dis- 
cussed affirmatively by C. L. Martin 
and V. C. Holsinger, and negatively 
by E. G. Deihm and H. F. Shank. 
Soliloquy — C. J. Rose; Literary Echo, 
by the editress, Irene Wise; Music — 
"Juniata" by the College Hill Quartet ; 
and Critics remarks by 

Friday evening, Jan. 19, the Society 
met in private executive session. The 
meeting was entirely a business meet- 
ing except a much appreciated address 
by Eld. J. Kurtz Miller of Brooklyn, 
N. Y., on "The Result of Doing Little 
Things." Parlimentary Drill and elec- 
tion of officers were the most import- 
ant features. The new officers are : — 
President, O. Z. Becker; Vice Pres., 
Paul M. Landis; Sec, Rhoda Miller; 
Editor, Harry F. Shank; Critic. Prof. 
W. K. Gish. 




22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




More wedding bells a-ringing! On 
December 24, 1911, Mr. W. K. Gish, 
'10, was married to Miss Mazie Mar- 
tin at her home in Ephrata. Mr. Gish 
has resumed his school duties here, 
which he will continue until Com- 
mencement time when he and his bride 
will leave for Alberta, Canada. We are 
loath to have them leave us but we 
wish them a \ery happy and prosper- 
ous life in the "land of the maple." 

Mrs. Gish was in attendance at the 
Bible Term. On the evening of Jan. 
10, the students and teachers of the 
school gave the young couple a little 
reception in honor of the event. Stu- 
dents and teachers marched into the 
room in pairs, singing a greeting song. 
After the congratulations Misses Mil- 
ler and Sheaffer sang the Bridal Chor- 
us from Lohengrin. Prof. Meyer gave 
a short talk and Mr. Gish replied. 
These were his closing words: 

"Here's to the stork who brought us, 
Here's to the mother who taught us, 
Here's to the rivals who fought us, 
Here's to the maiden who caught 

us." 
Refreshments were then served and 



all chatted and were merry, rejoicing 
with Mr. and Mrs. Gish in their good 
fortune. 

At the beginning of the New Year, 
Mr. A. P. Geib, '09, spent an afternoon 
at the College. He says he enjoys his 
work at the Bible school as well as at 
the mission. He is in preparation at 
present with the view of going to 
China in the future. The Alumni of 
E'town are beginning to waken up to 
mission work. Others are in prepara- 
tion. May we hope that many more 
will follow their example. 

During the Bible Term Mr. J. F. 
praybill, '07, sent us a taste of the 
bread they eat in Sweden. It is rather 
strange looking compared to our bread 
but quite palatable, and undoubtedly 
more nourishing. 

Miss Mamie Keller is taking advan- 
tage of Leap Year, especially in the 
way of making dates. 

Quite a number of our Alumni at- 
tended one or more sessions of the 
Bible Term. Among those who were 
present are the following: — Ruth 
Stayer, '07, Mary Royer, '07, Mrs. 
Frank GroiT, '04, Jno. Miller, 'OS, Es- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



tella Frantz, '09, Ella Young, '09, 
Floy Crouthamel, '10, Kathryn Moyer, 
'10, Martha Martin, '08, Will E. Glas- 
mire, '07, Bessie Rider, '03, C. M. Neff, 
'08, Martin S. Brandt, '09. 

Mr. Holmes S. Falkenstein, '10, 
spent some time here on Jan. 2 before 
returning to his work at Juniata. 

We are very glad to say that Miss 
Lillian Falkenstein, '11, is with us 
again as a student. 



Miss Elizabeth Kline, '10, has re- 
turned to the old place as the third 
teacher in the music department. Her 
smile of good will and her genial dis- 
position make work easier and burdens 
lighter. 

E. G. Diehm, '10, is back at work 
again after a prolonged absence, hav- 
ing been engaged in helping to survey 
the borough of Elizabethtown for the 
development of sewerage plans. 



Resolutions of Respect 



Whereas, It has pleased the Al- 
mighty to call from time to eternity 
Mr. Abram M. Price, father of our 
feltew-student Miss Mamie Price, be 
it resolved : 

First, That we, the faculty and stu- 
dents of Elizabethtown College, do 
hereby tender to the sorrowing family 
our deep sympathy, and do most earn- 
estly commend the grief-stricken 
mother and children in their sadness to 



the One who can comfort as none other 
can. 

Second, That a copy of these reso- 
lutions be sent to the bereaved family, 
and that copies of the same be pub- 
lished in the Harleysville News and in 
(3ur College Times. 

Sara T. Moyer 
Paul M. Landis 
Jacob Harley 

Committee 



# 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




['.m^...L^...J .,*.-..i Ji.,«...« J. *««..,Lw«^L , i*r.AV;,I« H« 



Albright Bulletin always contains 
excellent stories and the Christmas 
issue seemed above the standard. The 
paper is very well edited which shows 
activity in every department. "The 
New \'oice in the Choir" is especially 
fitting at that season of the year when 
gifts are so freely given. The author of 
"Genius — An Acquired Power" states 
that that characteristic has been de- 
veloped in most men instead of being 
inherent and cites several notable 
persons to prove his point. 

"College Student" is the first school 
paper of the new year to come to our 
table. Judging from this number they 
mean to keep up and raise the standard 
of their paper. An interesting and in- 
structive discussion is given on the 
"San Jose Scale" and how to rid the 
country from such a pest. "Com- 
panionship and Example" shows how 
much we are influenced by our asso- 
ciates and notes several famous men 
who say they owe their place in the 



world to their companions whom they 
had as examples. 

In scanning the pages of the Wash- 
ington Collegian, we notice that over 
half of the paper is devoted to athletic 
notes and advertisements. The only 
literary feature "The Literary Value 
of the Old Testament" is a well writ- 
ten essay on the literary importance of 
the Book of Books, and how much this 
masterpiece contains that we are ig- 
norant of and consequently can not 
appreciate. 

In a trolley car: 
She wished she stood within hi.- shoes, 

Because he had a seat; 
But since that was impossible, 

She stood upon his feet. 

"The nation of today, more than 
ever, needs men strong not only 
physically, but also mentally, and yet 
more morally, for the prosperity and 
permanence of any nation depends, 
above all else, upon the moral charcter 
of the statesmen who lead and the citi- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



zens who follow." — Normal Vidette. 
"It is up to the voter to say wheth- 
er we will have party bosses or wheth- 
er we will have leaders controlling 
our government. It is the duty of ev- 
ery voter to go to the polls on election 
day and place in office only those who 
stand for right and justice, and have 
at heart things that make for the com- 
mon good." — The Susquehanna. 

The fateful time is drawing near 
When bachelors should falter, 

Else some one fair, the present year 
Will lead them to the altar. — Ex. 

"Idleness produces pain and the 
pain becomes a spur to activity. Pleas- 
ure at best is a poor incentive to eflfort. 
Man needs the spur of misfortune to 
enabPe him to meet heroically the pro- 
blems that confront him during life." 
—Normal Vidette. 

"The world today is crying for the 
noble, the true man and woman ; the 
one to whose care can be entrusted the 
affairs of the nation, a great nation, a 
great people ; the one whom they can 
trust to do the right thing at the right 
time; the one who will not shirk duty; 
the one on whom they can fully de- 
pend. We need not necessarily do 
anything great, but we must do the 
little things that we may chance to 
find each day, fill in the nicks where 



no others can, work in that quiet, un- 
assuming way which finds a place in 
the world at all times." 

— Hebron Star. 

"Honor, dignity, aristocracy, prefer- 
ment and the like, have in times past 
been thought to be the purpose of 
education, but thanks to the progress 
of education in this day that its first 
purpose is to make us better in be- 
ing able to serve our generation bet- 
ter. This noble idea of education 
grows more in a decade than it did 
formerly in a century. This means 
the betterment of the world in all 
lines." — College Life. 

The following college publications 
have been received: Weekly Gettys- 
burgian, Washington Collegian, Pur- 
ple and Gold. (Ford City), The Tar- 
gum, The Comet, Shamokin High 
School Review, College Rays. Carlisle 
Arrow. Lordsburg College Educator, 
The Perkiomenite, The Signal, Dale- 
ville Leader, Grove City Collegian, 
Delaware College Review, Purple and 
Gold fAshland), M. H. Aerolith, Heb- 
ron Star, College Student, Rays of 
Light, The Susquehanna, Albright 
Bulletin, The Owl, Friendship Ban- 
ner, Philomathean Monthly, Normal 
Vidette, Ursinus Weekly, Berean 
Worker, Tempe Normal Student, Red 
Man. 



26 OUR COLLEGE TIMES 

50 N. QUEEN ST. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Our new and la?ger store enables us to give you th* best service possible in the Jewelry business. 
SILVERWAKE of the very best quality at prices most reasonable. 
WATCHES. Our ranee in price is from $150 to $1.00. 
CLOCKS. Frcm $300 chime clocks to the alarm clock at 85 cents. 
EYE-GLASSES and Sf ECfACLES fitted to the eyes with no charge for exami.;ation. 
Our Manufacturing and Repairing Department cannot be excelled in Pennsylvania. Everything is 
done in our own shop, by -jur own workmen— You are always welcome at Zook's Jewelry Stere. 

D. Walter Miesse 

The College and School Photographer 

INDIVIDUAL AND CROUP 

PORTRAITS 

Bell Telephone 290J 

24 WEST KING STREET, LANCASTER, PA. 




Mention Our College Times When Writing, 
GEO. R. KERSEY <5<# 



27 



DENTIST 



ELKABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

TOOTH BRUSHES, FLESH BRUSHES, 
SPONGES, Etc. 

A. W. CAIN 



WE DO IT RIGHT. 



Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES CBb SON 
A. R. LEICHT 

Manufacturer ofPJne VeHJCleS 

Repainting and Repair Work Given CaretuI Attention 
EMZABETHTOWN. PA. 



I LEO KOB 

i * 

I Heating and { 

I Plumbing | 

I ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. | 

|„| i, | ,i lMl i. |„| ., H i » »» 4 .. H .. H .. H . 4 i, H .». | i. H .. i i4i. | .. l . 

FRANK H. KELLER 

Dealer In Fancy and Staple Groceries 
Provisions, Etc. 

Our Highest Ambition to Please You. 



BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 
PHOTO SUPPLIES FOR SALE 
Centre Square 



* College Jewelry of the Better Sort | 

IcWmTREISNERl 

I I 

i Manufacturing | 

i Jeweler I 



= Class Pins and Rings Prize Caps 

g; Fraternity Jewelry Medals 

1 LANCASTER, PA. 

SiiiiaiiinBii!!BiniBiinBiiiaiiiaiiiiiB!!iiniiiiBiniBiiiiBiiiiBiiiiii 



F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 
GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 

HORSESHOEING A SPECIALTY 
North Market Street. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



J. CROFF & SONS 

Meat Market 



NORTH MARKET ST. 



A 4* Thos< 



Those who are judges of good Ice Cream say that 

I Miesse's Ice Cream 

is the most Delicious and Satisfying 
thev have eaten. Try it for yourself 

We serve farties, Weddings, Dinners 
and Receptions with cakes and ice cream 
with perfect satisfaction. 






lESSE, 123 N.Qunen SL, Lancaster * 

iam sold in Elizabethtown by J. C. Gross ♦ 



UP TO DATE 

Shaving and Hair Cutting 

R. H. SHISSLER. 



Clias. H. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

EI,IZAB£THTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



28 Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage 

/. E. BELSER 



For Koofine, Spouting, Tin and 
Granite Ware, Milk Cans, Radi- 
ators, Portable Furnaces.Granite 
Lisk Roasters in four sizes, or 
any special orders in my line. 
Give me a trial. 



First-Class Shoe Rjepairing 

W^ork Guaranteed Prices Reasonable 

I RUBBER HEELS make WALKING EASY 
JOHN C. BERBERIAN, E. High St. 

I 

I 

Opp Erchangc Bank ^ 

I ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. * 

I W. A. Ashenfelter | | 

* ?* ♦ Elizabothtc 

« CHOICE BREAD AND * ♦ ^ 

^►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^♦oo^oooo 



**»•♦»♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

I H. .H BRAND! \ 

♦ 

J Dealer in 

♦ ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 

♦ SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 



I \V( 



CAKES 



E. L. RENSEL 



/eddings and Parties supplied with 9 
<J Fancy Cakes at short notice. » 

J^ y General Blacksmitliin^ 

* ♦ and Repair \Vi rk 

% S. MARKET ST., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA J Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

**»*«##♦♦***♦«****>- jr**r^#*^#*** Park St., Elizabeth town. Pa. 



Plain Suits, Ready-Made or Ordered, at 

ADOLPH GANSMAN'S 

Clothier 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orangs Sts., Lancaster. Pa. 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

Dental Parlors 



S. J. HEINDEL,, DenUst. 



RunalioutSSOO 




fully Equipped at Above Prices 
Call on or Address 

H. S. NEWCOMER, - Mt. Joy, Pa. 




ELIZABETHTOWN 

ROLLER MILLS 

J. p. BINKLiEV, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades ol 
FLOUR AND FEED 

Highest Cash Prices paid for grain. 

hay and straw 

ELIZABETHTOWN. - PEXXA. 

5 AND lOc STORE 

Let us make your Nickels, Dimes and 
liuarters dodouhle duty. Nothing in the store 
is priced more than U)c and from that down. 

M. W. ESHENOWER 
ELIZABETHTOWN. - PENVA. 



John .A Fisher 



BARBER 



Centre Square. 



Ellzabethtown, Pa. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



Chas. R. Boggs, Restaurant 



First-CIass c^VIeals at All Hours 



0/"8ters In Season 



Confectionery", Ice Cream 



»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

I S. G. HERSHEY 

< > ^ 

I Groceries, Dry | 

Goods and | 

Notions * 



-" ElilZABETHTOWN 



JACOB FISHER 

Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Center Square, EUzabethtown, Penna. 

Wilh you for 31 years. That's All 

E. H. LEHMAN 
COAL 




Bell and Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers In 

New and Old Books 

Bast Orange St., liancaster, Pa 

CHOICE MEATS 

A. K. Young 

EUZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



For All Kinds of 
FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & McBride 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 




DR. JEROME G. HESS 
DENTIST 



Hertzler Bldg. 
Elizabethtown Pa. 




Ebersole & Baney 

Dealers in 
Choice Groceries, Fine Grade of Teas and 

Coffees, Fresh Country Bntter and Eggs 
Bell Phone EUzabethtown, Penna 

Grover Hefflefinger 

Shoes Repaired Shoes Shined 

Hats Cleaned 

S. Market St. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 




For Up-to-Date 

Furnishings 



Men, Women 

and Cblldren 



I. D. 
BENEMAN'S 

Dept. Store 
MT. JOY, - PA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of iTour Patronage. 



THE ''ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD'' 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year Sample Copies Free 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 



EIvIZABETHTOWN, 



Poorman's Bakery 

Choice Bread, Roils & Cakes 

HUMMELSTOWN ST. 



Willow Grove 

Poultry Farm 

Emblem and Toulouse Geese Indian Runner 

Ducks, Rose Combed Rhode Island 

Red Chickens 

STOCK FOR SALE AND EGGS IN SEASON 

DUROC JERSEY RED HOGS 

J. B. ALDINGER, 

R D No 4 Elizabethtown, Pa. 




S. B. KIEFER 

Notary Public 

Insurance, Heal Instate ami Collections 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



GUY GOCHNAUER'S 
Up-to-Date Shaving Parlor 

South Market St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

CENTRAL MEAT MARKET 

All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 

H. H. GOOD EUZABETHTOWN 



GEO. A. FISHER 

HARDWARE 

Automobiles 
Plionoyraplis and 
Records 
F. P. GAS PLANTS 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - I'EN'NA. 




S. p. ENGLE 



Dry Goods, Notions, Foot- 
wear, Carpets, Linoleums 
and Oil Cloths 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



^M^.^.»,I „ ^ „^ ■■ ^ ■■^■^■»»^■^■. | .^i^l,|l,|■■^ „ ^■■ n ■ » »♦ 

Fashionable 

COLUMBIAN 

Plymouth Rocks 

THE UTILITY BEAUTY BREED. 
BREITIGAN'S REGAL STRAIN 

True Plymouth Rock and Light 
Brahma crosses reduced to the 
modern fishionable "Rock" type 
and size, resulting in constitutional 
strength and vigor and wonderful 
laying qualities. 

Kggs and stock for season. 
Write for illustrated circular and 
Mating list. 

James H. Breitigan 




Wenn Sie zu Stadt kommen auf dem 
Blitzwagen oder auf dem Eisenbahn, bit- 
ten wir Sie fur ein Stieck zer Erfriesch- 
ung. Das Nissley Zimmer hat schnelle 
Zubereitungen. 

14-16 Kesten Str.\szi 
LANCASTER, PA. 




: 

WE ARE AFTER YOU t 

cTVIR. cTVIAN 



We want you for a customer, so we 
tempt you with a store full of uncommon 
values. Come and see them. Sooner 
or later you are going to lind out the ^ 
advantage of quality, service and price, ♦ 
to be obtained here. The sooner you * 
do it the better it will be for you. T 




>« i 



MARTIN 

Clothier and Furnisher 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



: 
: 

: 

♦ 

i 
I 



fl> 



Our.customers are all pleased custom- 
ers, because we really stand back of 
everything we sell. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



I THE ^ BOOK ^ STORE 



Books, Stationery, School 

Supplies and Post 

Cards 



Sunday School Supplies 

and Mottoes 

Mail Orders Solicited 



I C. N. FALKENSTEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. | 



iPaintinG anb paper 
IbatiGlng 

AMO S B. DR ACE 

J. M. BENNER 

FREIGHT, BAGGAGE and EXPRESS 
Furniture, Pianos, Machinery 

PLATE GLASS A SPECIALTY. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



GRAYBILL 




ILL 



Fresb milk and cream daily. .\ll milk 
tested for children; free from tuberculosis 

HOTELS AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED 



J 



<iA. W. MARTIN 

COAL, WOOD. GRAIN 
FLOUR and FEUD 



Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWN, 



TAKE YOURj 

Laundry to Fisher's 

eaves every Tuesday and Thursday morninK. 
Returns VVednesday and Friday afternoon. 

J. RALPH GROSS 



THE B.\RBER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



I O. N. HEISEY I 

^ Provisions, Groceries, CBi Choice Candies ^ 

j^ HEISEY BUILDING ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. ^_ 



%(C0 n-t t n 




CHARACTER SKETCH LADY ALICE EGERTON 8 

POLITICAL BOSSISM 9 

SPARE MOMENTS 11 

EDITORIAL 13—17 

THE STUDY OF LITERATURE 14 

CHINAS PROGRESS 15 

VALUE AND INFLUENCE OF GOOD ENGLISH. 16 

SCHOOL NOTES 18—21 

KEYSTONE SOCIETY NEWS 18 

CHAPEL TALKS BY PROF. MEYER 19 

ALUMNI 22 

EXCHANGES 23 

RELIGIOUS APPOINTMENTS 25 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



EVERYBODY'S STORE 



ELIZABETHTOWN 
PENNA. 



Your needs supplied at 
satisfactory prices in Dry 
Goods, Groceries, Keady- 
to-Wear Clothing for Men 
and Women of all ages, 
Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oil- 
Cloth, Shoes, Etc. 

Polite attention. 
Square dealing. 
Guaranteed satisfaction. 




Agents for Made-to- 
measure 

CLOTHING 

International Tailoring Co. 

New York 

Star Tailoring Co. 

Chicago. 

American Ladies Tailoring Co. 

Chicago 

Up-to-Date Samples 

On Hand 



HERTZLER BROTHERS AND COMPANY 



W. S. SMITH, President. 



PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 



AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier. 



U. S. DEPOSITORY 



Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits Over $145,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid on 
special deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 











DIRECTORS 




W. S. Smith 


Elmer W. Strlckler 


Peter N. Rutt 


F. W. Qroft 


J. S. RlBser 


B. L. Qeyer 


B. 0. Olnder 


Amos O. Coble 


B. E. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



•I **The House of Good Clothes" ? 




RANDEGEE KINCA1D & CO 
CLOTHES 



Get that Aitumn Suit or Overcoat ott your mind and on your back. A "High 
Art" Model will complitnent your taste anil your tailor. 

"THE STORE ACCOMMODATING" 

S. M. MYERS 6l CO., ['a^( 

CLOTHIERS, HATTERS AND FURNISHERS 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



SHOES 



More and more 
Elizabe t h t o irn 
feet are getting 
the habit of keep- 
ing comp'ny with 
onr Shoe Depart- 
. ^ ment. There's a 
*^v^l reason of course. 
Prices very, very 
easy on the purse 
and easy on the 
feet. Shoes for 
for the whole 
famUy. 

: : Huntzberger-Winters Co. 

Department Store 
ElilZABETHTOWN, PA. 




"MH 



■♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• H-H-H 



IIIIIBIIIIBIIIIBIIIIBinBillllBIIIIIHIIIII 

COI.I3MBIAN and RED CRUSS 

Heaters and Ranges. 

THE FINEST LINES MADE 




This space is reserved for 
The EUZABETHTO-WN 
A MARIETTA ELEC- 
TRIC UOHT CO. 



Jos. H. Rider & Son 

lllinBIIIIBIIIIBIIIIIBIiniBIIIIBIIIIBIIIII 



^ ♦♦♦ ♦ ♦■ [ ■♦ ^ ■♦♦ ♦ ♦■ H . » »»» » *»»l | ll ||M| , » f 

I WE EARNESTLY SOLICIT A ; : 

LIBERAL PATRONAGE 

FOR 

LUMBER 

AND MILL-WORK 



Cement, Slate, 

Snckett Plaster Board, 

Patent Plaster, 

Ruberoid Roofing, 

White Ooat, 

Mapes & Miller's Fertilizer, 

Ruberine Paint, 

and all kinds ot 
Building Material. 
We aim to give a S(iuare deal that will 



MUTH BROTHERS. 
ElilZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



I GET THIS BIG 

I POULTRY REFERENCE BOOK 




I GREID£R'S FINX CATAIX)0 

B 1912 has 224 pp containing 57 pictures of show fowls 

g in natural colors Largest and most practical poultry 

= book published for experienced raisers. Its text is so 

H clear and concise that beginners can easily understand 

I B. H.GREIDER, Box C, RHEEMS. PA ■ 

iiiiiii!iiiiiaiiiiiiiiiHiiiaiiiiiBiiiiai»iiBiiiiiBiiiiBiiiiiaiiiiiniiiiBiiiiiB" 



2 You Can Improve Your * 



By Subscribing for * 

THE BUSINESS EDUCATOR » 

By Practicing from » 

THE ZANER METHOD MANUAL | 

or By Attending 5 

THE ZANERIAN COLLEGE t 



w For Circulars, Prices, Etc. 

5 Apply to 

I ZANER & BLOSER CO. 

£ Penmanship Specialists 

I Columbus, - - Ohio | 



We Are Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
Made To Order 

Plain 
Clothing 

In This Country 



When in Lancaster it will pay 
you to visit ours, the only 
Clothing Store in that city that 
has One Price to All and gives 
discounts to none. See us for 



Men's Ready Made and 
Made to Order 

Clothing 

AND 

Furnishings 



Youth's and Boys' 
Clothing 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Since 1854 at 
Centre Square. Next to City Hall 

Lancaster, Pa. 



I 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



f Greater Speed— Greater Accuracy— | 
I Greater Etficiency— are tlie i 
I logical results ot installing ttiel 



UNDERWOOD j 

Typewriter j 




EXCLUSIVE Underwood features make possible the most important labor- 
saving systems of modern accounting. 

The ever growing demand puts the annual sales of the Underwoods far 
ahead of those of any other machine — making necessary the largest typewriter 
factory and the largest typewriter office building in the world. 

Such a demand from busines^ men everywhere is unquestionable evi- 
dence of the practical mechanical superiority of 

''The Machine You Will Eventually Buy." 

Underwood Typewriter Co.- 

UNDERWOOD BUILDING NEW YORK 

I ♦♦■1^^1^^^^'I " ^'^'' ^ ^^ "^ ^ "I ■^ ^"^ ^^^ ^ ♦»^ I ^4H^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^» ^ ^^ I ^^ ^ ■^^^ I ^♦4^♦ ^ ^♦♦ ♦*^ ■ ^ ^ ^ ■^ I ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ * ^ ^ ^ * ' I ^^^ ♦ 



(§m (Halk^i ©tntPH 



Elizabjcthtown, Pa., March, 1912 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Elizabeth Myer Editor-in-Uhief 

W. K. Gish, '14 School Notes 

Mamie Keller, '12 Society News 

Levi Ziegler, '13 Society News 

W. F. Eshelman, '12 Exchanges 

■' Sheaffer, '09 Alumni Editor 

1 Business Manager 

'10 Art Editor 



Leah 



Ralph \V. Schlosser, '1 
Daisy P. Rider, 



Published monthly during the school year. 

This paper will be sent continuously to old subscribers, so as not to break their files, and ar- 
rearages charged, unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration. 
Address all business communications to the Business Manager. 
Terms: 50 cents per year ; single copies, 10 cents. 



E>N^ » II W i M<^;f-«w t ' ■ » « *<;^«-«>^^v*»*^;^*-»»A^ 






IMPOR TANT ! S TU DENTS I 
DO YOU KNOW THAT 

TT is only because of the kind patronage of our business and our profes- 
► sional men in this town and elsewhere, that this magazine exists. They 

have indeed shown themselves friends of Our College and of " Our Col- 
lege Times." 

Therefore, we justly and fairly may ask you, when about to buy any- 
thing, to consider first those who by their advertising have made this maga- 
\ > zine possible- 

MV have solicited only advertisers who are reliable in all respects- 

^AM»».^/WW .iiVlM 1^,11 ,^H »^M.«<|/W*W.rf|/Wi 

I READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS 



^ »<^/w»»«^/wt. 



r ll^uw*--uv- 



«v^ 



BUSINESS MANAGER OF "OITR COLI^EGE T1M£S • 
-»^ / Wt ..rf l ^it l^ y Vli .. ^M .^^^n i<| ^M ..<| ^| | 



Character Sketch ot Lady Alice 
Egerton 



Composition in Preparatory English by Rhoda Miller 



LAD\" Alice Egerton, the sister 
of Lord Brackley and Thomas 
Egerton, was the oldest child 
of the Earl of Bridgewater. She was 
about fifteen years of age and was by 
nature a loving, trustful girl, very 
deeply attached to her parents and to 
her two younger brothers who were 
her constant companions. She, as well 
as her brothers, had been reared in a 
royal home. Here they had everything 
they could wish for and "were nursed 
in princely lore." 

Lady Alice, because of her owii pure 
character, was an ideal person to por- 
tray what the author intended her to 
be ; viz., the personification of the pow- 
er and beauty of a virtuous life. One 
of her most noteworthy gifts was her 
musical voice. Her sweet singing was 
her greatest personal charm. It was 
not only sweet and clear, but it also 
reflected her depth of feeling and her 
depth of thought, Comus in compar- 
ing her singing to the singing of his 
mother, Circe, gives it full praise when 
he says, 

"Yet they (meaning Circe and the Sir- 
ens) in pleasing slumber lulled 
the sense, 
And in sweet madness robbed it of 
its self 
But such a sacred and home felt de- 
light, 
Such sober certainty of waking bliss, 
I never heard till now." 



When Comus came to her in the 
guise of a shepherd, she received him 
in a very courteous manner ; told him 
of her brothers ; and. without a thought 
of distrust, accepted his offer of help 
with these words, "Shepherd I take thy 
word, and trust thy honest offered 
courtesy." She not only trusted the 
shepherd but also her brothers whom 
she expected to come to her at any- 
time. On the other hand, her elder 
brother had full confidence in her. He 
knew her pure character and firmness 
of mind so well, that he felt confident 
she could resisit all temptations whicli 
she might meet. 

In her continued refusals to drink 
the cup of julep which Comus so per- 
sistently offered her, we have a good 
proof of her firmness of mind. That 
she was "not" afraid of Comus. nor 
afraid to give her own opinion, is 
shown by her reply to Comus. in which 
she boldly gave her own views as to 
what temperance meant. Her tone 
which was usually so gentle and kind 
was now so determined and convinc- 
ing that Comus began to see that he 
could not influence her. He knew that 
she told the truth and felt that her 
words were "set off by some superior 
power." 

This "superior power" was truly 
possessed by the Lady. It was virtue, 
her most striking characteristic around 
which all the others centered. It was 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



only because of her virtuous life that 
she was able to resist all the alluring 
temptations of Comus. Her elder 
brother was right when he said, "Vir- 
tue may be assailed but never hurt." 



His sister proved his statement. 

"After all the characteristics of 
Lady Alice have been summed up, she 
beams forth as an ideal type of woman- 
hood." 



Political Bossism 



J. E. Myers, '14 



THAT there are great political 
questions before our nation is 
a recognized fact. It is not too 
much to say that these questions are 
more difficult in their solution than was 
the great slavery question of our fore- 
fathers. One of these questions is 
boss rule in politics. Political bossism 
is an organization, usually a leader and 
his ring, who, unauthorized, have 
charge of selecting candidates for of- 
fices to suit themselves and elect them 
through corrupt methods. 

Nearly one million people vote each 
year for the first time and are then 
sought, coaxed, deceived, belied, el- 
bowed, and bribed. Hence my purpose 
in choosing this qeustion has been to 
direct our minds more fully to exist- 
ing conditions so that we may not be 
influenced by bribery and fraud, but 
so that we may take a stand for truth 
and justice and be staunch patriots to 
our nation. 

The original idea of a party was a 
group of citizens gathered about a 
prominent nian. The leader created 
his party ; and not the party, its leader. 
Xo party put Hamilton at the head of 
the Federalists nor Jefferson at the 
head of the Republicans of their day. 
The party was regarded essentially a? 



a school of political thought and the 
leader as one of exceptional personal 
qualities. 

Today no one is designated to have 
charge of selecting candidates and con- 
seciuent!}' it has become the common 
resort of selfish and unprincipaled men. 
Our political machines are putting 
men into office who suit their own sel- 
fish motives and purposes. The man 
does not seek the office but the office 
seeks the man. The conditions now 
are such that we have made the inci- 
dents of such service so repulsive to 
those who are capable of filling the of- 
fice and so attractive to those who are 
incapable that, when the office finds 
the man ready to seek it, in ninety-nine 
cases out of a hundred the office will 
do well if it display considerable activ- 
ity in getting out of his way. 

Some one says, "Statesmanship has 
degenerated into bossism." Money 
rule has a powerful and corrupting use 
in politics. The realm of politics is be- 
coming so corrupt that clean and self- 
respecting men are disposed to avoid it. 
It is too often the case that the more 
worthy and circumspect a man is the 
less influence he has politically. 

Thus, schooled j'oung men conclude 
that politics is a prize game : that pop- 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ular government is a farce ; and, that 
all there is in it is what can be gotten 
out of it. Many thousands lean to- 
wards that party which makes the big- 
gest. 'display and which has the best 
prospects of success, and dismiss the 
pure principles from their minds. 

But our nation is awakening to this 
corruptness and is trying to subdue it. 
Last year in New York, Chas. F. Mur- 
phy, boss of Tammany Hall, did his 
best to force Wm. F. Sheehan, his can- 
didate for U. S. Senator upon the Leg- 
islature. Sheehan's political record 
was such that it needed little discus- 
sion. He formerly came from Buffalo. 
The election methods of the political 
machine in that city long ago are still 
remembered. Murphy made a slight 
error in his judgment. It was a very 
little slip but a bad one for as shrewd 
&s he was. It caused a deadlock. 
Sheehan was out and the public awoke. 
Governor Dix took a commendable 
position on the case ; he frequently de- 
clared that he would keep out of the 
contest, and that the State Legislatures 
should elect U. S. Senators and that 
neither he nor any one else had any 
right or any a'rhciity whatever to in- 
teifere with ;he Legislatures in the 
performance of their constitutional 
duty. 

When Dr. Woodrow Wilson of 
Princeton University became the State 
Executive of New Jersey, he found 
such a problem awaiting him as nn 
other •'•o\-crnor had to face. In this 
state the prim •. les had declared Mr. 
Martine as a c?ndidate for U. S. Sena- 
tor. This w:r> not legally binding up- 
on the Legislature. Immediately the 
f.egislature v/as ready to cl oose a ma 
chine politician of the old school. 



"But," said the G, vernor, "the primar- 
ies are morally oinding." In this Gov. 
Wilson assumed the position that, as 
Governor, he was his party's leader in 
New Jersej. With that prsition no 
one quarreled except the bosses. Wil- 
son's favor with the public -vas increas- 
ed by their opporition. 

Just the other day in New Jersey the 
Republican boss, Kuehnle, and three of 
his lieutenants were convictci of fraud. 
Kuehnle gets a year in prison and is al- 
so fined one thousand dollars. His 
lieutenants are placed in the county 
's.! for sevcr.Ji months. 

The backitairs of politics is being 
discovered, yet wc have no definite 
plan to foKow Go>eri,mcnt of the 
people and by the nxp'c ten !s to lie 
•.cgarded is cveryijody's f)usiness; and 
what's everybody's business is no- 
body's. Should a private concern be 
managed by no one in particular, it ab- 
solutely coiihi not survive. Even in a 
home there must be some concentra- 
tion of responsibility. What is true of 
a private concern and a household is 
also true of public affairs. If public 
affairs arc to be carried on at all, some- 
body must see that it is done. This 
sounds like a truism ; but it is neverthe- 
less, a truism that has been much neg- 
lected. The theory seems to be that 
public business must be made every- 
body's business. 

You say it must be made everybody's 
business if it is to be government by 
the people. Should we leave the many 
thousand voters in our great cities 
without other guidance than their own 
haphazard, antiquated notions, we 
practically would abandon the public 
offices to a contemptible minority. This 
would not seem [)lausible for the prcs- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



Chas. J. Bonaparte suggests a solu- 
tion, but he is not quite certain whether 
it would be a solution or not. His plan 
is to elect a party leader at a regular 
election. The person receiving a plur- 
ality of votes thus cast would become 
the party leader and the next three or 
five his advisory committee. His duty 
would then be to consult the advisory 
committee in this work and to place 
names on a regular ticket at the party's 
primaries. Bonaparte does not believe 
that the party leader chosen would 
usually be the present local boss. This, 
then, would be the business of som 
definite, designated person ; otherwise 
we leave it to any one who grasps it. 



Friends to truth and justice, we must 
awaken the conscience and manhood 
of our citizens. So long as men are in- 
fluenced by money and through ignor- 
ance, they do not think for themselves. 
It is our duty to propagate education. 
The gospel of the brotherhood of man 
is to work out our own salvation of 
society. 

If we wish to do this, our intelligent 
and thoughtful men must stand up be- 
fore the political boss and spurn his 
bribes and threats. The educated man 
has a special burden of responsibihty ; 
for to him much has been given, and 
from him the nation has a right to ex- 
pect much in return. 



Spare Moments 



(An address prepared by Rev. W'ag- 
ernagle for the students of our College 
which he was prevented from deliver- 
ing, hence contributed it as an article 
for Our College Times.) 

Like birth, marriage, death and oth- 
er pleasant ( ?) things, young people 
can generally expect to enjoy the ex- 
perience of a College course but once 
in a lifetime. With some persons it is 
but a "day dream," with others an un- 
deserved boom. Many go to College 
for no other reason than that it has 
been their family's custom. They go 
therefore as a matter of course and 
view a college course in the light of a 
four year's holiday amid congenial sur- 
roundings and an unfailing supply of 
money. Except in extraordinary cas- 
es, a College course yields to such per- 
sons not much more than pleasant 



memories of a life free from cares, a 
circle of friendships, and habits toler- 
ant of intelligent endeavor on the part 
of others. 

On the other hand, we are glad to 
say there are those to whom education 
is no unmeaning thing, to whom the 
words education and college are syn- 
onyms with opportunity, and privilege, 
and enthusiastic effort ; to them, edu- 
cation does not mean a shirking of well 
chosen tasks and the paying of undue 
attention to the "side shows of Col- 
lege life" as was said by Pres. Wilson, 
of Princeton ; to them education means 
loyalty to a lofty ideal, the making the 
most of opportunities, and a sane dis- 
tinction between what is all important 
and what is secondary and incidental 
in College life. 

Young people in going to College to- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



day are not entering monasteries, or 
convents. College life is not to be re- 
garded as the serving of a four year's 
term in jail with no purpose and ra- 
tional provision made for the harm- 
less escape of the irrepressible spirits 
of youth. It rather makes a wise and 
reasonable distribution of the elements 
of work and play. Ex-President, Eliot, 
of Harvard, is of the opinion that the 
majority of American students could 
with benefit divide their day into equal 
periods of eight hours each, one third 
for sleep, one third for study and class- 
room attendance, and one third for rec- 
reation, eating meals and the reading 
of general literature. 

It is said that the most valuable ad- 
vice to sinners is given by those who 
themselves were once hardened sin- 
ners and out of the fullness of my ex- 
perience as a student in Academy Col- 
It ge, and Theological Seminarv. I, a 
C T. 11 

converted sinner and one who now be- 
holds the errors of his College ways of 
not \ery long ago. am in a position to 
wPirn these young men and women as 
to what pitfalls to avoid and what op- 
por; unities to embrace in the yca's that 
stretch before them. You are masters 
of your College fale in the degree thai, 
;n ilif cur-ent ]:)hrase. you mind your 
Colk-f^e business. 

'•'it curriculum of ihc average 
.American school is not unreasonable 
iu ihat it does not require the student 
11 ri'-cn— '■ 'i th- ■ OF^M;',' in prop- 
er oreparation of lessons and cred't- 
able recitation of the same. If Col- 
lege work were one incessant "grind" 
as some imagine, then ins.uu asylums 
;im1 sjnitariums would bj more ncccs- 
.^ary adjuncts ihan gymiM^nim and 



recreation halls. Even it most Col- 
leges would undertake to recaiire of 
tlici- students as much work as their 
catalogues would lead one to believe, 
then cur American educatu/iia' institu- 
tions would each year turn out is'tel 
lectual prodigies by the wholesale and 
would approach the unremitting at- 
tention to business and general thor- 
oughness of the typical. 

If you doubt the soundness of the 
foregoing assertion as to the spare 
moments the majority of the American 
students enjoy, will you then explain 
the attenedance on the part of good 
and careless students alike, at not less 
than two football games a week, each 
game consuming several hours of pre- 
cious time? If this is untrue, how 
shall we account for the presence even 
of faithful students at the concert and 
theatre, at the fraternities and club 
houses and class mates' quarters? How 
do many clo.se students find time to 
make social calls and indulge in other 
incidental features of College life? Be- 
cause they ha\c spare moments? I 
believe the average .American student 
squanders too nuich precious time and 
money. A student need not go far a- 
field to find wholesome diversions. If 
a student goes to college only to spend 
his father's money and to misuse his 
own God given gifts and graces, in 
after years he will be brought face to 
face with the declaration of Scripture 
that "Whatsoever a man soweth that 
fliaV, l--? also rear " The real student 
is to be trained for future usefulness 
in the home, the state, and the church. 

He does not enter College with thf 
hope that when he graduates he will 
be a walking library of universal in- 
formation in every conceivable depart- 



OUR COLLE'GE TIMES 



ment of human knowledge. If he has 
an honest, humble, open mind; he will 
not go far before he is simply appalled 
at his own ignorance and at the ef- 
forts he must make even tj be counted 



fairly well advanced in the attainments 
of human learning. If education serves 
no other purpose than to assure us that 
we know little of what may be learned. 
it has done mankind a irreat service. 



(To be continued). 




•^HtHDHH 



Hk-^^^ 



First of March 

The Summer's in her ark, and this sun- 
ny pinioned day 

Is commissioned to remark whether 
Winter holds her sway: 

Go back thou dove of peace, with the 
m>Ttle on thy wing; 

Say that floods and tempests cease, 
and the world is ripe for Spring. 

— Horace Smith 

Calendar of Events 

^larch 4. — The next event of public 
interest to be held at the College will 
be the Anniversary of the Dedication 
of our College Buildings. The comm't- 
tee appointed to arrange a program for 
this occasion,— H. K. Ober, J. Z. Herr. 
.\nna Wolgemuth, and Elder S. H. 
Tlertzler. — are taking pains to provide 
something good. 



Elder H. C. Early, Chairman of the 
Board of Education of the Church of 
the Brethren, will give the principal 
address on this occasion. He is a very 
able public speaker, and our friends 
cannot afford to miss this address. All 
are cordially invited to be present. 

;\Iarch 25. — The Spring Term of 12 
weeks opens Monday, March 25. All 
those expecting to board at the Col- 
lege then should engage a room soon. 
Address all communications to Dr. D. 
C Reber, Pres. 



The date is not }'et decided upon, 
but in the latter part of March or be- 
ginning of April, Prof. G. P. Bible will 
give us an "Elocutionary and Musical 
Entertainment." Carefully watch the 
town papers for announcement of 
-same. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



March 21.— Our Winter Term of fif- 
teen weeks closes on Thursday noon 
of March 21. 

.April 18.— Address by Dr. F. J. Stan- 
ley — Subject, "The Supremacy of the 
Pacific — Occidental or Oriental — The 
Pivotal Question of the Century," in 
the College Chapel at 8.00 p. m. 

Do you know of any persons who 
Si-e thinking of attending a Higher In- 
stitution of learning this Spring? If 
so please send their names and ad- 
dresses to Dr. D. C. Reber. Say a 
good word for us whenever you can. 

The old saying, "Troubles seldom 
come singly," is verified again in the 
instance of the experience that has 
come to our former pupil. Miss Bessie 
Horst. of Hershey, Pa. Just a few 
■•.reeks after the death of her mother, 
news ; cached her that her father had 
passed away in the city of Reading. 
His body was brought to Palmyra for 
interment. We again express our deep 
<rt sympathies to Bessie in this hour 
of double bereavement. 



C'1-operation, Co-ordination, Federa- 
tion, and Consolidation— these are ^he 
watchwords that are astir in the Edu- 
calio;ia' and the Religious world. Men 
are planning, hearts are throbbing, 
pra>Pi • are ascending, God is over- 
ruling. What, oh, what v.ill the great 
resuh< he: 

The Study of Literature 

Simeonc has beautifully said "Lit- 
crp.u re is the atmosphere of the mind. 
In it we live, move, and have our being 
intellectually." 

Literature gives such culture to the 



mind as no other branch of study can 
give, for.it opens the door to all sorts 
of knowledge. What would the study 
of history be with' its dry-bones of 
names and dates without considering 
in connection with these, the soul-mot- 
ives and heart-needs of a people as 
found in their literature. We know- 
that mathematics gives accuracy to 
the mind and alertness to the hand, 
but what does it do for the soul? It 
gi\es culture to only a few of the fac- 
ulties of man, while literature serves 
to develop not only reason and judg- 
ment, but also the memory, the imag- 
ination, and above all, the heart and 
soul. 

Some say that mathematics is neces- 
sary to help our boys and girls earn 
their bread. Ah, yes, but we do not 
want our young people to know onlv 
etc., but we do want them to know 
how to be clerks, mechanics, surveyors, 
how to think and feel, and how to move 
the masses in the right direction. 

Miss Mary E. Burt, of the Cook 
County Xormal School, Illinois, says: 
"The highest office of teaching is not 
to open the child's mind to the evolu- 
tion of the material world, or to teach 
him to adapt his resources to his own 
subsistence. The greatest hunger of 
the soul is not for material things. 
What the child needs is training that 
will help him to understand soul-mo- 
tives and heart needs, that he may 
more freely give to the heart-hungr\\ 
and more freely receive from the soul- 
ful : that he may live out of. and away 
from his meaner self; that he may grow 
all-sided: that he may look with ana- 
lytic, rather than with critical eye upon 
the erring: that he may relish the 
homelv side of life, and weave a beauty 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



into its poverty and ugly hardships; 
that he may add to his own strength 
and wisdom, the strength and wisdom 
of past ages." 

Is it not true that many of our young 
people who leave school at the age of 
seventeen and eighteen have had their 
time spent on drills in Arithmetic, and 
in rushing through six hundred pages 
of disconnected fragments in the old 
school reader, and have not much con- 
ception of what is beautiful in litera- 
ture? They have not had their view of 
life broadened and their tastes for 
reading refined by the critical study of 
two or three complete classical works. 

The value of the Hindu, or Greek 
Myth, of the Roman story, of the Medi- 
aeval Legend, of the Lyric Poem, of 
the Classical Biography, of any genu- 
ine piece of literature, is not in the 
knowledge of it as we may know rules 
in Arithmetic or Grammer ; but it is in 
the enlargement of the mind to a con- 
ception of the life and development of 
the race : to a study of the motives of 
human action, so that the mind can 
discriminate and shall be able to esti- 
mate the value of events and opinions. 
How true are the following words from 
Whittier : — 

"The riches of a commonwealth 
Are free,' strong minds and hearts of 

health ; 
And more to her than gold or grain. 
The cunnin-j hand and cultured brain." 

China's Progress 

The situation in China aflfords a fer- 
tile field for the exercise of one's imag- 
ination. Here upwards of half a bil- 
lion of people are awakening to self- 
rule. With the dethronement of the 
Manchus. the Mongolian race casts off 



its exclusiveness, and now, all chan- 
nels of intercourse with the civilized 
world being open, the giant will quick- 
ly arouse from his long sleep. 

Consummate statesmanship, how- 
ever, is needed on the part of those 
who hold the reins of government 
while the reorganization is in progress 
and the attempt is made to consolidate 
the interests of the shattered empire 
under a republican form of government 

But the moderation, foresight, and 
patriotism displayed by such men as 
Dr. Sun and President-elect, Juan-Shi- 
Kai inspires as with hope. According 
to present indications the ban will 
promptly be put on the importation of 
opium ; the cause of popular education 
will be fostered ; and Christian mis- 
sions will be encouraged. The morn- 
ing of a new day is dawning for China. 
^ -J- H. 

Prospects 

Prospects for the Spring Term are 
fine ! Word comes to us from many 
quarters saying that old students are 
returning and new ones are coming. 
Mary E. Myers writes from Green 
Castle, concerning a room and room 
mate, saying that her work as public 
school teacher will soon close. Word 
from Rebekah Sheafifer says that she 
C. T. 7. 

had expected to close her school in 
time to enter here at opening of the 
Spring term, but she was sick with 
tonsilitis recently, so that will delay 
her a few Azys. 

Ada Brandt informed us on Feb. 17, 
while calling at the College, that she 
had twenty-seven days more to teach 
and then would return. 

Isaac J. Kreider. a graduate of Mil- 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



lersville Normal School, who has been 
teaching in Lebanon County, enters 
upon the College Course with us this 
spring. 

There are a number of others whom 
time will not permit us to mention in 
this article. 

Perfect English 

To acquire a pure style is the aim of 
every writer of good English. To do 
this one nnist study the best models, — 
the masterjjieces of the language. 

More and more, writers are recogniz- 
ing that the purest English to be found 
anywhere is in the Bible. Many of the 
Psalms are models of strong and yet 
simple English. Of this English in the 
Bible, a noted divine. Dr. Faber, says : 

"It lives on the ear, like a music that 
can never be forgotten, like the sound 
C. T. 8 

of church bells, which the convert hard- 
ly knows how he can forego. Its felic- 
i'ies often seem to be almost things 
rather than mere words. It is a part 
of the national mind, and the anchor 
of national seriousness. 

"The memory of the dead passes in- 
to it. The potent traditions of child- 
hood are stereotyped in its verses. The 
power of all the griefs and trials of a 
man is hidden beneath its words. It 
is the representative of his best mo- 
ments, and all that there has been about 
lim of soft and gentle and pure and 
1 enitent and good, speaks to him for- 
ever out of his English Bible. 

"It is his sacred thing, which doubt 
has never dimmed, and controversy 
never soiled. In the length and 
breadth of the land there is not a Pro- 
testant with one spark of religiousness 
about him whose spiritual biography 



is not in his Saxon Bible." 

— Brumbaugh's Fifth Reader 

The Value and Influence of Good 
English 

WOULD you believe it if we 
should tell you that there are 
at present more than a thou- 
sand languages in use on the earth, 
each of which is. comparatively speak- 
ing, unintelligible to the speakers of 
the others, and now in the beginning 
of the twentieth century we feel that 
the English language is the outgrowth 
and climax of them all : the flower of 
the plant, the apex of the pyramid, the 
language of the future. 

Two Teutonic tribes, the .\ngles and 
Saxons, came to England in the year 
449 A. D. They brought with them 
the language of the Teutons, who in- 
habited a tract of land which coincides 
with modern Germany. They rublied 
against the Celts, who had. formerly 
been conquered, killed the Celtic men 
and married Celtic women, and the 
language of the different tribes be- 
came, for five-hundred years, what was 
known as a hash or mixture. In 1066 
the Normans concpiered England. The 
French language was introduced, and 
for three hundred years after the Nor- 
man conquest, three languages were 
used in England. The French was the 
language of the court and the aristoc- 
racy. The Norman priests used Latin 
in their church services, and the mid- 
dle and lower classes stubbornly ad- 
!.( red to the .\nglo Saxon. A conflict 
followed, the question which should 
predominate, arose, and finally the re- 
sult was the development of a com- 
posite tongue, — Modern English. The 
bone, sinew, and frame work of this 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



lai.guage was Saxon, the flesh and 
blood being the words derived from 
the French and Latin. Together with 
its sinewy strength, our language pos- 
sesses rare beauty, grace, and perfec- 
tion through the influence of Latin and 
French. 

It is interesting to note the propor- 
tion of Anglo Saxon words used by the 
various English writers. 28-29 of the 
words in the Bible are A. S. ; Swift 
used 8-9 : Milton, 7-8 ; Shakespeare, 5-6 
Spencer and Addison, each, 4-5 ; John- 
son, 3-4 ; Pope and Hume, 2-3 ; and to- 
day he is the most powerful speaker, or 
writer, who uses the purest Anglo Sax- 
on diction. Its simplicity makes for 
directness, which commands the atten- 
tion of the hearer or reader. Our 
mother tongue is A. S. How shall we, 
who speak the language of Shakespeare 
and Milton, and who live in the land 
of Emerson and Longfellow, best make 
use of our great heritage? How shall 
we best teach others to use the mother 
tongue in its beauty, and strength, and 
purity ? 



.\ knowledge of technical English 
Grammar helps much in the use of cor- 
rect English. A certain writer says, 
■'Grammar is an answer to the eternal 
'Why'? and a reason for our faith," in 
the language which we use. Grammar 
is the Decalogue of Language, and 
bears the same relation to it as the Ten 
Commandments bear to society, the 
frame-work to the house, or the skel- 
eton to the body. As a man taps a 
plastered wall to find a beam before 
driving a nail, so we, when uncertain 
aliout the form of a certain verb, ask, 
"what is the number of the subject," 
or. in use of a pronoun, we ask, "does 
it agree with its antecedent?" 

Although we own this fact, that a 
knowledge of technical English Gram- 
mar helps much in the use of correct 
English, 3-et the most fluent use of 
language comes only through a read- 
ing of the best literature, and an ap- 
plication of that reading in conversa- 
tion. 



The Song of Hope 



Back of the bloom- 

The bloom ! 
Back of the strife — 

Sweet life. 



Fronting the night- 

The light ! 
LInder the snows — 

The rose ! 



.A.nd flowering meadows that glow and .\nd the vales sing joy to the misty 

gleam, hills. 

Where the winds sing joy and the dais- And the wild winds ripple it down the 

ies dream. rills : 

And the sunbeams color the quicken- And the far stars answer the song that 

ing clod. swells 

And faith in the future, and trust in ^^'ith all the music of all the bells! 

God. Fronting the night — 

Back of the gloom— The hght! 

The bloom! F;v.nk I. Stanton 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 







^.ri^"^' 



CHOOLJHOTE 





i4 



Homerian News 

In the private meetings of the 
Homerian Literary Society held on 
February 2 and 9, discussions were 
given by Charles E. Resser on the fol- 
lowing subjects: "The Origin of the 
Earth and Stages of the Earth's His- 
tory Leading to the Known Eras." 

The following public program was 
rendered on the evening of February 
16, 

Invocation by the Chaplain, B. F. 
Waltz ; Piano duet entitled "C Major 
Symphony No. 1, by Beethoven, played 
by Misses Leah Sheaffer and Elizabeth 
Kline; Miss Nora Reber then read a 
discussion on "The Chinese Revolu- 
tion" ; Miss Elizabeth Kline sang "The 
Rosary," by Ethelbert Nevin ; a read- 
ing "The Soul of the Violin," was giv- 
en by Miss Lilian Falkenstein ; Speak- 
er's address by J. E. Myers, was well 
prepared and finely delivered. The 
Speaker's address is, according to the 
By-laws of the Homerian Constitution, 
an ex-angural address given by the 
chief executive officer at the close of 
eight weeks administration. This ad- 
dress is published in full in this issue 
of Our College Times. 



Keystone Society Notes 
Friday evening, Jan. 26, the Society- 
met in regular Literary session. The 
new officers were inaugurated and as- 
sumed their duties. The President, 
Mr. Becker, chose for the subject of 
his inaugural address, "'Benefits de- 
rived from Literary Society Work.'' 
Other features were, — Instrumental 
Solo, by Miss Leah Sheaffer ; Vocal 
Solo, "Little Boy Blue," by Miss Kath- 
ryn Miller; Select Reading, "Awfull)' 
Lovely Philosophy," by Irene Sheetz, 
hu(\ the Literary Echo by the editor, 
1 larry Shank. 

We who live in such small circles 
and whose minds cannot comprehenil 
the greater and more complex things 
of 1,10 stand and look in amazement 
w her. we try to measure the minds and 
s. lilt of our great geniuses. We can- 
not imagine what emotions have throb- 
"acd in the hearts of our great poets. 
We think of Milton almost as of some 
super human being. His works give 
us material for many an hour's medi- 
tniioii and pleasure. On Feb. 9, t!ie 
following program of which "Comus" 
( Milton's great masque) was the theme 
v.a.-% rendered : 

Diagram of the Masipie. H. H. Xye ; 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



When and for what purpose was Com- 
js" Written? Louise Matthias; Para- 
phrase of "Comus," Gertrude Miller; 
Music, "Thou Sweet Gliding Kedron," 
by Ladies' Quartet; Misses Sheaffer, 
Moyer, Miller and Kline; The Wood 
Scene, Albert Reber ; The Palace Scene 
Orville Becker; The Castle Scene, W. 
F. Christman ; Character Sketch of the 
Attendant Spirit, Mary Sheaffer; Im- 
aginary Conversation between Comus 
and the Lady from the Wildwood to 
the Palace, written and read by Virgil 
Holsinger ; Character Sketch of Comus 
Orpha Harshberger ; Character Sketch 
of the Lady, Rhoda Miller ; Contrast 
the Two Brothers. Walter Eshelman ; 
Quotations from Comus, Edgar Deihm, 
€. J. Rose, C. L. Martin, Virgil Hol- 
singer; Music, "Vocal Solo," Elizabeth 
Kline. 

Science Department 

It is not more than fair to those who 
contributed to the equipment of the 
Physics Laboratory that we should 
:nake note of their kindly assistance, 
for "Every little helps." Albert L. 
Reber, a member of the class in the 
First Year's Course in Physics, made a 
"very substantial and serviceable bench 
for the projectoscope and rheostat. This 
is a valuable addition for if purchased 
from a factory such a bench would 
cost from fifteen to twenty-five dollars. 

Walter Eshelman, Virgil Holsinger, 
und C. G. Webner of the same class 
and B. F. Waltz, a member of the class 
in College Physics, made donations in 
money, from two to ten dollars each. 
Tlie class in College Physics donated 
dark shades for the Physics room. All 
of tbese donations are gratefully re- 
ceived. Others have promised the de- 



partment valuable donations which we 
shall acknowledge in the same way as 
soon as we have received them. 

We are pleased with our equipment; 
including the $350.00 cabinet our equip- 
ment is worth from $950 to $1000.00. 
The Chemistry equipment is worth a 
little less than half this amount. 

It may also be interesting to know 
that a friend of the school has been in- 
terested, by one of our students, to the 
extent that he is thinking of giving the 
department the sum of $500. We are 
glad for the growing interest. 



Chapel Talk by Prof. Meyer 

THE following general points on 
the subject of "Health" were 
discussed on Feb. 15th: — Exer- 
cise more in the open air. Eat at reg- 
ular periods only. Bathe more in cold 
water instead of always in warm water. 
Each morning, bathe the neck thor- 
oughly in ice-cold water to prevent 
throat troubles. Drink a glass of cold 
water every morning, on rising, to 
cleanse the alimentary canal. Quit 
drinking teas and coffee! Don't sleep 
in clothing worn during the day. Quit 
worrying, concentrate more, work 
harder. Be calm and thoughtful in ex- 
citement. Be anxious for the joys of. 
life that come to him only who is in 
possession of good health of body, of 
mind and of the moral make up. 

Health enables one to do the best he 
is capable of doing, to live his life ef- 
fectively, grandly. Health brings so 
many charms and such great blessings 
that it is a pity so few possess it. 
Health means a clean skin, a bright 
eye, a firm step, erect carriage, grace- 
ful movements, great power of endur- 
ance, and a cheerful temper that waits 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



on good digestion. A student needs 
the joys of life that go with a sound 
Ijody in order to hold his own, among 
the bitter and sweet, in the struggle of 
life. Poor health implies impairment 
of the nervous system, a lack of self- 
control and repose of manner, which 
are absolutely fatal to the best inter- 
ests of the school. He aiso said that 
the school should never be a hospital 
for weak and diseased people. The 
college is willing to do what she can 
for these but we need the healthy and 
robust all the more. Many students 
who are well when they enter school, 
do not know how to care for their bod- 
ies in a boarding school where the re- 
straint is lif*ted. Persons whose diges- 
tion is bad, or who cannot sleep, or 
who cannot exercise in the open air, 
seldom have a sweet temper or calm 
judgment. Sickness not only causes 
misery but it is expensive. It is a pub- 
lic as well as a private expense. "Pub- 
lic health is public wealth."' The music 
of our college is flatted every time 
some of our students are sick. 

We want healthy students and the 
community wants healthy citizens. 
Let us learn to take care of our triune 
make up. so tliat the physical, the in- 
tellectual and the moral powers which 
we call temperament may be properly 
cultivated and cared for. Is it not fair 
to assume that every young stiulent 
may cultivate those traits of character 
that result in a disposition that is hap- 
py and cheerful? To this end let us 
summon all the energies of mind, heart 
and soul. 

• We should all seek U> better under- 
stand the laws I if our nature, as well 
as the law of growth and decay. Just 
as the plant sn man, in sj)ite of all cau- 



tion and care passes through the same 
cycle of development and decay. 
There are however two fundamental 
truths which offer encouragement to 
all those who cherish life, and especial- 
ly the life of the intellect: First, every 
individual by obeying the laws of 
health, can measurably facilitate 
growth and postpone the hour when 
deterioration begins. Secondly, he can 
give such supremacy to mind con- 
science, and the will as to make the 
soul, to a good degree, defiant of bod- 
ily ailments, and to keep constantly- 
growing as long as life lasts. 

Agricultural Notes 

\Ve notice that the truck patch is 
being treated to a coat of manure. 
-Several acres arc to be planted in po- 
tatoes and we hope this year we'll have 
letter luck than last year. 

The berry patches have a fine stand- 
ing; and tmless the severe cold has 
l)een too nnich for them, we are look- 
ing for a fine crop. The College hogs 
are doing very nicely. We hope to 
have eight nice fat hogs ready for the 
butcher by March 1.^. 

It is the idea of the .Agricultural De- 
partment to have the truck patch be- 
come a splendid .source of income and 
if the plans for the current year are 
carried out, we believe that much will 
be ready for the dining-room by next 
fall. This is a very worthy move and 
should receive much encouragement. 
Cultivation and fertilization are two of 
the essential principals which the pres- 
ent (lay farmers need to learn. 

Religious Items 
The warm spiritual atmospiierc of 
the special I'.ible Term continues. The 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



special classes out-side of the required 
courses have increased in attendance 
and interest. A class studying the 
Gospel of Matthew meets every Satur- 
day morning at 8.00 o'clock. A number 
of our noble young people are definite- 
ly dedicating their lives to active 
Christian service. Some are planning 
to prepare for active mission work. 
Two have enrolled for regular Bible 
Class work in connection with their 
regular courses. 

Seven is our usual number studying 
"Prayer" in the class at Mrs. Grofl's 
home every Thursday afternoon. 

Sunday evening, Feb. 4, the Mission- 
ary Circle enjoyed an hour of singing 
and prayer service with Bro. I. N. S. 
Will and Feb. 18, with Grandma Groff. 

The iVIissionary Circle will render a 
short program on China, followed by a 
missionary sermon by one of the mem- 
bers of the class, Feb. 25, at 7 p. m. 



School Notes 

The extreme cold has abated. 

^^'inter's snow has melted. 

Who will find the first snow drop? 
A\'here will the first returning blue- 
bird build her nest' Whose ear will 
catch the robin's fir>t song? 

Campus and drive are soft and mud- 
dy. Use the cement walks. Don't 
step on the grass for every step will 
leave a foot-print., and our landscape 
gardener may call a halt. 

Winter tenn closes >.Iarch 21 ! Ex- 
aminations will soon be on ! Woe to 
those who didn't "get busy !" 

Elders Jesse Ziegler and S. H. 
Hertzler represented the Board of 
Trustees at a Conference held Sat. 
Feb. 17. at Blue Ridge College located 



at Union Bridge, Md. They were 
conveyed to and from the place by A. 
G. Longenecker in his automobile, S. 
G. Graybill accompanying them. The 
difi^erent schools beside ours that were 
represented at this conference were 
Juniata, Bridgewater and Daleville. 
The following members of the General 
Educational Board of the Church of 
the Brethren were present : — H. C. 
Early. Penn Laird, Va. ; J. C. Bright, 
Dayton, Ohio; Otho Winger, N. Man- 
chester, Ind. ; W. B. Yount, Union 
Bridge, Md. It is difficult to predict 
just what the results of this confer- 
ence will be. 

The College Men's Quartet— W. K. 
Gish, W. K. Kulp, v. G. Holsinger and 
Harry Shank — sang two selections 
at the ^^'omen's Union Missionary 
Meeting held in the United Brethren 
Church in Ehzabethtown. on Sunday 
afternoon, Feb. 11th. 

Elder J. C. Bright of Dayton, Ohio, 
'^n his return from the conference at 
Union Bridge, stopped at Elizabeth- 
town, for a short time. He preached 
ni the church in town Sunday evening- 
Fib. 18th, and addressed the school in 
chano! on the following morning. 

.''■fr. Leiter (Orthography teacher) — 
"Xovv, George, spell 'needle'." 

"X-e-i-d-l-e, needle." 

Mr. Leiter — There's no 'i' in needle. 

ijeorge — "Well, tisn't a good needl» 
th. II." 

Mi>s ?v'a:iiie Price who left school 
on Jan. 13. bcviuse of the death of her 
failuT. ha-; rcKmied her studies at the 
College. 

Prof. J. S. Harley and R. C. Mac- 
Kley are the champion walkers among 
the College people at present. 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



St. Valentine's Day brought many 
sweet (candy) and "heart"-y greetings 
from friends to loved ones at the Col- 
lege this year. One of the biggest 
boys in school (could you guess who) 
sent a valentine with this message on 
it:— 

"F'retty one, I hope you know 
This is from your little 'Beau'." 

The Social given on Friday evening, 
Feb. 16, for the benefit of both Board- 
ing and Day Students, was pronounced 
a success. Misses Ruth Erb of Pal- 
myra, and Elizabeth Kline of Eliza- 
bethtown, carried off prizes as the best 



entertainers. The singing of "Love's 
Old Sweet Song," by Miss Kline was 
a most fitting close to the exercises of 
the evening. 

Harold Resser is like all other bright 
little fellows, — he likes to ask ques- 
tions. He even put one to the Profes- 
sor of Physics at the table the other 
day. 

Was it the extreme cold weather, 
or the dainties of College boarding that 
brcnight such a harvest to the dentist 
from College teachers and students re- 
cent! v? 




Mr. W. K. Gish, '10, was favored 
\ ith a short visit from his wife on Fri- 
flay, Feb. 16. 

( )ne Alumnus has already written 
ioi a room for the Spring Term. Others 
should follow so wise an example. 

We w€re glad to have with us, re- 
cently, Mrs. J. J. Heilman of Lancas- 
ter, who came to assist Miss Myer to 
catalogue her books. Mrs. Heilman, 
V' and Miss Myer visited Mr. S. G. 
Graybill's Dairy farm, back of the Col- 
ic gc. and saw the milking machines in 
rpcration there. 



A subscription to "Our College 
Times," came in recently, from Chi- 
cago. It came from Mr. Frank Byer 
V ho was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Eby, '03. 

Does every Alumnus subscribe for 
this paper? If not, why not? It's a 
letter from home. Be sure you get it! 

.\ card from Mrs. J. A. BufTenmyer, 
07 contains the following: 

"On Feb. 2 our home was blessed 
with a little son. His name is Mark. 
]r.\m and Ruth are very fond of him 
;.n(' refuse to give him up." 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



Prof, and Mrs. J. G. Meyer are now 
;hc proud parents a beautiful baby girl. 
The little stranger made its advent on 
leb. 6, and has been named Leah Mil- 
dred Meyer. The cradle roll is still 
increasing. 

Mr. F. L. Olweiler, '11, paid a visit 
io the College on Friday, Feb. 16. 

A card to the editor sent by a gradu- 
ate contains the following toast : — 



To Vimmin 

I trink der health of vomen-kind, 

For her mine heart vas friend-vise ; 

But ven she did excited git — 

She talks so fast your chance vas NIT, 

I'o git ein vord in end-vise : 

But den dot lonesomeness so queer. 

If doze shweet voices vasn't here . 




..-k4SiioK.-..L...«--*>X-»--''*-^"'''J»'*"''<''J«'*<«»«i«^^ 



The Philomathean Monthly still 
maintains that high standard set by 
the Editor of the paper. This magazine 
may be classed with college literature 
for it has a strong literary department. 
In fact all the departments breathe the 
genuine college spirit. However, we 
think an Art department would be a 
great improvement to such a paper. 
".^rt and Religion" is an instructive 
essay in which the author shows the 
relationship between these two factors 
and how the one advanced during cer- 
tain periods of growth in the other. 

Western Maryland College Monthly 
although published by four literary 



societies does not contain any society 
notes. The Exchanges and jokes 
should not be substituted for the Edi- 
Dorials. Nevertheless the paper has 
some good stories and up-to-date dis- 
cussions which show the originality 
of the writers. By reading "Burns as 
Seen in the Cotter's Saturday Night," 
one gets a deeper insight of the genius 
of Scotland's ''Ploughman Poet." 

"The deep, black clouds of war 
which have gathered through the pre- 
ceeding centuries and have shaded and 
reddened the brightness of the morn- 
ing sun are rapidly dispersing. They 
are lined by the silver lining of a new 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



day. unprecedented, but hoped for long 
ago. America the sun of the nations, 
which has guided the world in all 
issues for a higher development is 
again anticipated to lead the world to 
the ultimatum of civilization." 

Albright Bulletin. 

Father — "Johnny, what are you 
making all that racket for?" 

Johnnj' — "So I can go out and play 
tennis with it." 

Father — "Then you'll need a bawl 
too. Bring me the trunk strap, young 
man." — Ex. 

"Vou are leaving an influence. It 
will be here while you live, and more, 
it will remain when you are dead. A 
young man once, on his death bed, was 
heard io sa_\-, "Gather up my influence 
and bury it with me." What deep 
anguish and regret must have been his 
because his life had not been what it 
should ha\'e been. His friends could 
not do as he asked. He was responsible 
for the footprints he left on the sands 
of time." — Daleville Leader 

Teacher — "William, how would you 
punctuate this sentence, "The wind 
blew a five dollar bill around the cor- 



er? 








\\i 


Ham — " 


[ would 


make a dash 


fter 


t." 




—Ex. 



"If reading good literature will not 
ins])ire every man wImi reads it. to 
worthier actions it may at least so 
modify his inclinations, that whereas 
not having read he remains passive. 
Some men need a continual curb, that 
they may withhold from treading be- 
yond the l)ounds of recognized light 
and moral jjropriety. Such men good 
reading will restrain. .Some men are 
hv nature rood, but thev lack the stim- 



ulus of action, that they may assent 
the good that is in them. Such men 
good reading will inspire to noble ac- 
tion." Susquehanna. 
"The Exchange Editor may write 

Till the tips of his fingers are sore 
But someone is sure to exclaim 

Oh pshaw! I've heard that before." 

"The consolation for all lies in the 
assurance that the turmoils and storms 
of life last not forever; that rain clouds 
do not always hide the sparkling rays 
of the sun ; that every cloud has its 
silver lining wliich is as true as it is 
familiar; that life has its raptures, its 
griefs, its struggle^, but it also has its 
triumphs." ^—Albright Bulletin. 

"It's easy enough to be pleasant 

\\'lien there's nothing to make you 
fret. 

But the man worth while 
Is the man who can smile 

\\'hcn his wife turns suflfragette." 

— Targum. 

"We are told that we have sudd«nly 
become a world power, and therefore 
we have a world-wide responsibility, 
and that responsibility is to establish 
justice, not force ; to build colleges not 
battleships ; to insure peace not war. 
Our aiin is to strike the chains from 
the ankles of war-burdened humanity. 
( Hir duty is to proclaim our faith in 
the power of justice as opposed to the 
force of arms. May it be said of us 
that we found the world .shackled with 
militaryism, but left it blessed with 
peace : that we found humanity a mass 
of struggling individuals, but left it a 
united brotherhood. May it be said 
of us that we fulfilled our mission as 
a world jxiwcr ; that \\c were brave 
and strong enough to lead the world 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



into the path of universal peace." 

—Red & Black 

"Oh. my friends," said the eloquent 
orator, "there are some spectacles that 
one never forgets." 

"Ahem !" spoke up an old lady in the 
audience. "Td like to know where 
they sell 'em." — Ex. 

We acknowledge the following ex- 
changes for this month : : — Collegian, 
Targum, Owl, Red Man, Purple and 
pold, (Ford City), College Rays, 
Western Maryland College Monthly, 
Juniata Echo, Shamokin High School 
Review, Normal School Herald, Al- 
bright Bulletin, Rays of Light, Perk- 
iomenite, Delaware College Review, 
Mercury, M. H. Aerolith, College Stu- 



dent, Red and Black, Philomathean 
Monthly, Purple &. Gold, Comet, Lin- 
den Hall Echo, Ursinus Weekly, Dale- 
ville Leader, Gettysburgian, Tempe 
Normal Student, Susquehanna, Car- 
lisle Arrow, Friendship Banner, Lords- 
burg College Educator. Chautauqua 
Courier. 



Oh, make us. Thou, through centuries 

long, 
In peace secure, in justice strong. 
Around our gift of freedom draw 
The safeguards of Thy righteous law; 
.\nd cast in some diviner mould, 
Let the new cycle shame the old. 

— John Greenleaf Whittier. 



Regular Preaching Services: — 

Jan. 28, 7.00 p. m.— Sermon Prof. J. 
G. Meyer. Subject — "Life more 
than Raiment." Text, Luke 12:23 

Feb. 4, 10.30 a. m. — Sermon, Bro. 
Levi Moliler. Subject — "Prayer." 
Text, Matt. 8:8,9. 

Feb 11, 7 p. m.— Sermon Prof H. 
K. Ober. Subject — "Remember Jesus 
Christ." Text, II Tim. 2.9. 

¥eh. 18, 10.00 a. m.— Sermon, Eld. 
S. R. Zug. Text, Heb. 2:1. Sub- 
ject — "Neglect." 
Christian Workers Meetings : — 

Jan. 14 — Leader, Laban Leiter. 

Jan. 28— Leader, Prof. Harley. 



Religious Appointments 

: — Feb. -I — Leader, Nora Reber. 

Mid-Week 'Prayer Meetings :— 



Jan. 24 — Leader, Laban Leiter. 

Jan. 31 — Leader, Orpha Harshberger 

Feb. 7 — Leader. Prof. Schlosser. 

Feb. 1-1 — Leader, Lilian Becker. 
Missionary Reading Circle : — 

Pres., B. F. Waltz. 

Teacher, Miss Stauffer. 

Reading, "The Unfinished Task." 
Sunday Morning Classes : — 

7.45 — "Prayer," taught by Miss 
StaufTer. 

8.15 — S. S. Lesson, taught by Miss 
Stauffer and Prof. Harley. 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Faculty 



D. C. REBER, A. M., Pd. D, President 
Philosophy, Pedagogy, German. 

H. K. OBER, Pd. B., Vice-President. 
Biological Science, Agriculture, 
Surveying. 

ELIZABETH MYER, M. E., 
Reading and Grammar. 

J. G. MEYER, Pd. B., A. B., Secretary, 
Mathematics, Physical Science, 
Greek. 

J. Z. HERR, Prin. Commercial Dept., 
Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Com- 
mercial Law. 

JACOB S. HARLEY. A. B., 

Algebra, German and Civics. 

LYDIA STAUFFER. 
English Bible. 

LEAH M. Sl^EAFFER, Pd. B., 
Piano, Orogan, Drawing. 



R. W. SCHLOSSER, Pd. B., A. B., 

English, Latin, French. 
KATIE E. MILLER, 

Director of Vocal Music, Voice 

Culture. 
ELIZABETH KLINE, 

Piano. Voice. 
ANNA W. WOLGEMUTH, 

Shorthand and Typewriting. 
\A'. K. GISH, Pd. B., 

I'. S. History. 
C. E. RESSER, 

Geography, History and Mathe- 
matics. 
LAURA E. HESS, 

Sewing. 
DAISY P. RIDER, Pd. B., 

(Absent on Leave.) 
ELD. S. H. HERTZLER, 

Exegesis (Bible Term.) 



50 N. QUEEN ST. 

LANCASTER, PA. 



Our new and l.i'Ber store enables us to give you th- best service possible 
SILVERWAKE of the very best quality at prices most reasonable. 
WATCHES. Our ranee in price is from $150 to $1.00. 
. CLOCKS. Frrm $300 chime clocks to the alarm clock at 85 I 



EYE-GLASSES and SFECIACLES fitted t 



ot be excelled in Pennsylvania. Everything 
vays welctme at Zook's Jewelry sure. 



D. Walter Miesse 

The College and School Photographer 

INDIVIDUAL AND CROUP 

PORTRAITS 



Bell Telephone 2U0J 

24 WEST KING STREET, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



I 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



27 



GEO. R. KERSEY A* 



DENTIST 



ELIZABEITITOWN, - PENNA. 

TOOTH BRUSHES, FLESH BRUSHES, 
SPONGES, Etc. 

A. W. CAIN 

\VE DO IT RIGHT 



Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES CBi SON 



A. R. LEICHT 

Manufacturer of FinO VehiclGS 

Repainting and Repair Work Given Careful Attention 
£UZABETHXO\irN, PA. 



jifliiiiiiiiiiaiiiini'';iaiiiiiiiiiiiniwiiiiBiiiiiBiiiiiiii!:ii!!iW''iiiiiiii 

^ College Jewelry of the Better Sort 

"G.WmJREISNER 

Manufacturing 
Jeiveler 

Class Pins and Rings Prize Caps | 

Fraternity Je-welry Medals ■ 

LANCASTER, PA. | 

tiiiiBiiiiBiiiiiiiiiiniiiiaiiiinT 



F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 
GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 

HORSESHOEING A SPECIALTY 
North Market Street- ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



J. CROFF & SONS 

Meat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



LEO KOB I 

Heating and | 

Pumblng | 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. * 



^ ♦♦ ♦ ♦ * ' l"l '< "H"H -*' l"H -* * - H"l"H"i" »** *» 



FRANK H. KELLER 

Dealer In Fancy and Staple Groceries 
Provisions, Etc. 

Our Highest Ambition to Please You. 

BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO SUPPLIES FOR SALE 
Centre Square 



Those who are judges of good Ice Cream say that 

Miesse's Ice Cream 

is the most Delicious and Satisfying 
they have eaten. Try it for yourself 

We serve Parties, Weddings, Dinners 
and Receptions with cakes and ice cream 
with perfect satisfaction. 

D. W. MIESSE, 123 N. Queen St., Lancaster 
Our Ice Cream sold in Elizabethtown by J. C. Gross 

;■ ^ ■■ ^ ■■ l ■■ ^ ■■ n .♦■ H i ^ ■ ^ ■»^l »^ ■ » ■^■ ^ l■^■, ^ , ^ ■, ^ , ^ l, ^ ■■ ^ ,»^l»^ 



UP TO DATE 

Shaving and Hair Cutting 

R. H. SHISSLER. 

Chas. H. Dieroft 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carelully Compounded 



28 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



********** ******************** 

/. E. BELSER I 

For Koofine, Spouting, Tin and $ 

Granite Ware, Milk Cans, Radi- j^ 

ators, PortableFurnace8,Granite ^ 

Lisk Roasters in four sizes, or J 

any special orders in my line. S 

5 Give me a trial. * 

^ Opp E.':chang<! Bank 2 

« EL.IZABETHTOWN. - PENNA. 5 

****************************** 

W. R. Ashenfelter | 

CHOICE BREAD AND * 
CAKES 

Weddings and Parties supplied with 
Fancy Cakes at short notice. 



S. MARKET ST., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA 



First-Class Shoe Rjepairing 

'Work Gnaramteed Prices Reasonable 

RUBBER HEELS make WALKING EASY 
JOHN C. BERBERIAN, E. High St. 



Plain Snits, Ready-Made or Ordered, at 

ADOLPH GANSMAN'S 

Clothier 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange Sts., Lancaster, Pa. 
ELIZABETHTOWN 

Dental Parlors 

S. J. HETNDEL, DenUst. 



1912 
Mode 



Tonring Car 

8900.00 
RnnabontSSOO 




H. H. BRAND! 



ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 



♦ Elizabcthtown, 

E. L. RENSEL 

General Blacksinithing 

and Repair Wurh 
Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

Park St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



I ELIZABETHTOWN 

I ROLLER MILLS 

♦ J. p. BINKtEV. Propr. 

j Manufacturer of Best Grades of 
I FLOUR AND FEED 

4 Higl'est Cash Prices paid for grain, 

♦ bay and straw 

♦ ELIZABETHTOWN, - PE-NNA 
♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

5 AND iOc STORE 

Let us make your Nickels, Dimes and 
Quarters do double duly. .Nothing in the store 
is priced more than 10c and from that down. 

M. W. ESHENOWER 
ELIZABETHTOWN, • PENNA. 

John .A Fisher 



Fnllj Equipped at Above Prices | 

Call on or Address I 

3. NEWCOMER, - Mt. Joy, Pa. Centre Square. 



BARBER 



Elizabethtown. Pa 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



Chas. R. Boggs, Restaurant 



First-Class cecals at All Hours 



Oysters In Season 



Confectionery, Ice Cream 



S. G. HERSHET 

Groceries, Dry 

Goods and 

Notions 

EMZABETHTOWN. - PENNA. 



JACOB nSHER 

Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Center Square, Ellzabethtown, Penna. 

With you for 31 years. That's AU 

E. H. LEHMAN 
COAL 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED, FLOUR, 

SEWER PIPE, ETC. 

Telephone 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

Bell and Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers In 

New and Old Books 

East Orange St., Lancaster, Pa 

CHOICE MEATS 

A. K. Young 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



For All Kinds of 
FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & McBride 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PES 



Hours 8 to 6 



DR. JEROME G. HESS 
DENTIST 



Hertzler Bldg. 
Ellzabethtown Pa. 




Ebersole & Baney 

Dealers in 
Choice Orooerles, Finn Grade o{ Teas and 
Coffees, Fresh Conntry Butter and Eggs 
Elizabethtown, Penna 



Grover Hefflefinger' 

Shoes Repaired Shoes Shined 

Hats Cleaned 

S. Market St. ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 




For Up-to-Date 

Furnishings 



Men, Women 

and Children 



I. D. 
BENEMAN'S 

Dcpt. Store 
MT. JOV. - PA. 



30 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of if our Patronage. 



THE ''ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD'' 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year Sample Copies Free 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 



ElilZABETHTOWN, 



Willow Grove 

Poultry Farm 

Emblem and Toulouse Geese, Indian Runner 

Ducks, Rose Combed Rhode Island 

Red Chickens 

STOCK FOR SALE AND EGGS IN SEASON 

DUROC JERSEY RED HOGS 



J. 



ALDINGER, 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Poorman's Bakery 

Choice Bread, Roils & Cakes 

HUMMELSTOWN ST. 




S. B. KIEFER 

Notary Public 

Insurance, Real Kstate and Collections 
ElilZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



GUY COCHNAUER'S 

Up-to-Date Shaving Parlor 

South Market St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



CENTRAL MEAT 



MARKET 



All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



H. H. GOOD 



ELIZABETHTOWN 



GEO. A. FISHER 

HARDWARE 

Automobiles 
Phonoyraplis and 
Records 
F. P. GAS PLANTS 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



S. p. ENGLE r 

S. Market & Bainbridge Sts. 
ELIZABETHTOWN. - PA. 



Goods, Notions, Foot- 
Carpets, Linoleums 
and Oil Cloths 



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Fashionable 

COLUMBIAN 

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THE UTILITY BEAUTY BREED. 
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True Plymouth Rock and Light 
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Write for illustrated circular and 
Mating list. i 

James H. Breitigan 




LITITZ, PENNA. 



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D. C. BRINSER 



Coal 



Grain, Flour, Feed, C 
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Rheems, - - Pa. 



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14-16 Kesten Strasze, 
LANCASTER, PA. 



We want you for a customer, so we 
tempt you with a store full of uncommon 
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everything we sell. 



MARTIN 

Clothier and Furnisher 

EUZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



32 



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I THE ^ BOOK ^ STORE I 



Books, Stationery, School 

Supplies and Post 

Cards 



Sunday School Supplies 

and Mottoes 

Mail Orders Solicited 



I C. N. FALKENSTEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. t 



painting anb Draper 
Ibanoing 

AMOS B. DRACE 

J. M. BENNER 

FREIGHT, BAGGAGE and EXPRESS 
Furniture, Pianos, Machinery 

PLATE GLASS A SPECIALTY. 

EI.IZABETHTO'WN, PENNA. 



cA. W. MARTIN 

COAL, WOOD. GRAIN 
FLOUR and FEED 



Telephone 



ELIZABETHTOWN. 



GRAYBILL 




College Hill Dairy 

Fresh milk ami cream daily. All milk 
tested for children; free from tuberculosis 

HOTELS AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED 



TAKE YOURj 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday moruinK- 
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J. RALPH GROSS 



TH£ BARBER 



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I O. N. HEISEY I 

■^ Provisions, Groceries, CBi, Choice Candies ^ 

'.^ HBfSEY BCILDINO ELEABBTHTOWN, - PBNNA. 5!" 




STUDYING WITH A CLASSMATE IS DETRI- 

• MENTAL TO EACH STUDENT 8 

SPARE MOMENTS 11 

EDITORIALS 13 

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MARRIAGES 15 

HOMERIAN SOCIETY NEWS 16 

KEYSTONE SOCIETY NEWS 16 

CHAPEL TALK 17 

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ELEVENTH ANNIVERSARY 18 

ALUMNI 19 

SUMMER TERM 19 

EXCH ANGES 24 



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EVERYBODY'S STORE^"'™^™'" 



Your needs supplied at 
satisfactory prices in Dry 
Goods, Groceries, Ready- 
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CLOTHING 

International Tailoring Go. 
New York 

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Up-to-Date Samples 

On Hand 



HERTZLER BROTHERS AND COMPANY 

W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier. 



U. S. DEPOSITORY 

Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits Over $145,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid op 
special deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 





DIRECTORS 




W. S. Smith 


Elmer W. Strickler 


Peter N. Rutt 


P. W. Qroff 


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B. L. 0«yer 


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CLOTHIERS. HATTERS AND FURNISHERS 



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SHOES 



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our Shoe Depart- 
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Prices very, very 4> 
easy on the purse J 
and easy on the ^ 
feet. Shoes for 4> 
for the -whole j^ 



Hunfzberger-Winters Co. % 

Department Store * 

ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. % 




This space is reserved for 
The ELIZABETHTOWN 
& MARIETTA EL EC- 
TRIG LIGHT CO. 



COLUMBIAN and RED CROSS 

Heaters and Ranges. 

THE FINEST LINES MADE 




Jos. H. Rider & Son 

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MUTH BROTHERS. 
ElilZABETHTOWN. ■ PENNA. 

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^ Penmanship Specialists ff 

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We Are Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
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Plain 
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When in Lancaster it will pay 
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Since 1854 at 
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I Greater Speed— Greater Accuracy- 
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Elizabkthtown, Pa., Apkil, 1912 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Elizabeth iMyer Editor-in-Chief 

\V. K. Gish, '14 School Notes 

Mamie Keller, '12 Society Xews 

Levi Ziegler, '13 Society News 

W. F. Eshelman, '12 Exchanges 

Leah iM. Sheaffer, '09 Alumni Editor 

Ralph W. Schlosser, '11 Business Manager 

Daisy F. Rider, '10 Art Editor 



Published monthly during the school year. 

This paper will be sent continuously to old subscribers, so as not to break their files, and ar- 
rearages charged, unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration. 
Address all business communications to the Business Manager. 
Terms : 50 cents per year ; single copies, 10 cents. 



IMPORTANT! STUDENTS ! 
DO YOU KNOW THAT 

TT is only because of the kind patronage of our business and our profes- 
■*■ sional men in this town and elsewhere, that this magazine exists. They 

have indeed shown themseh'es friends of Our College and of " Our Col- 
lege Times." 

Therefore, we justly and fairly may ask you, when about to buy any- 
thing, to consider first those who by their advertising have made this maga- 
zine po.ssible- 

We have solicited onlj- advertisers who are reliable in all respects- 



i READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS 



D*^ 



BUSINESS MANAGER OF "OUR COLLEGE "nMES ' 



studying With a Classmate 

Is Detrimental to Eacli Student 



The discussion of the affirmative side as given in the class in prepara- 
tory Rhetoric bv Marv A. Scheafifer and Orville Z. Becker. 



Studying with a classmate takes 
away self-reliance because there is too 
much dependence placed on the other 
student. I know of a young lady who 
writes her lesson exactly as another 
dictates it to her. What little culture 
she receives, she gets without effort. 
She takes the thought of another to 
the classroom, gives it to the teacher 
as her own, and receives credit for the 
same. This method of procedure takes 
away all the possibilities of her ever 
becoming independent enough to 
maintain her own opinions in the 
world. She can easily be led by any- 
one, for she constantly relies on others 
for all her needs and goes through life 
in a haphazard fashion. It must be 
marked then, that we go to school not 
only for what we get out of the text- 
books but also to learn to depend on 
ourselves. 

My opponents may claim that it is 
more beneficial for two students to 
question each other on a lesson than 
to study it alone. This is a false as- 
sertion, for the best work is done when 
studying alone. When two students 
go together to study and question each 
other about a lesson, in nine cases out 
of ten, they will drift to another sub- 
ject and acquire little knowledge of 
the lesson that is to be prepared. The 
best method of studying is for each one 
to dig into a lesson, unaided, and get 



out of it all he can, then, when he en- 
ters the classroom he can ask ques- 
tions. The best place for one mind to 
rub against another mind is in the 
class room, under the guidance of a 
skillful teacher. Then, the thoughts of 
the different members of the class can 
be tested and the true thoughts re- 
ceived and retained better than if 
some false idea received from some in- 
dividual must first be rooted out. Ex- 
perience has also taught me that any- 
thing worked out without outside help 
is the thing that will always be 
remembered. 

The next point that the affirmative 
intends to prove is that studying with 
a class-mate takes away the power of 
concentration, because each student 
hinders the other from pursuing a 
continuous line of thought. As soon 
as one student has his attention fully 
on the subject and is pursuing a con- 
tinuous line of thought, as is done 
when alone, then the other student 
throws in his remarks like chunks 
which cannot be assimilated and can- 
not be coordinated with his former 
thoughts. Then, too, the majority of 
students drift from one idea to an- 
other and in a few minutes they are 
side-tracked and are talking about 
some base-ball game or some exciting 
hunting trip. It is self evident that 
concentrating can be done more easily 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



and better when there are no outside 
things attracting the attention. Now, 
in preparing lessons together, much 
talking is done and therefore, there is 
great danger of many digressions be- 
ing made on different subjects. It is 
also true that ahnost all great poems 
and great speeches were written when 
everything was quiet and there were 
no outside things to draw away the at- 
tention, a fact which is positive proof 
that better concentrating is done when 
alone and therefore much better re- 
sults are achieved. 

In the next place, I wish to prove 
that studying with a class-mate also 
destroys originality. One of the aims 
of the student should be to be original 
in as many things as possible. In 
studying a lesson he should formulate 
his own ideas and opinions and not be 
dependent on others for their ideas. 
He should always be ready to give 
opinions and decisions of his own and 
not always quote those given by other 
people. This is something that is im- 
possible in studying a lesson with an- 
other person. Each one will give his 
ideas and opinions and the best ones 
will be accepted. Therefore, onh' the 
one that gave the particular opinion 
that both accepted, had the benefit that 
he would have received if he had 
studied alone. The other student was 
weakened because he accepted some- 
body else's idea and depended on that 
to see him through, and therefore did 
not have to think much for himself. 

The fifth point that the afifirmative 
wishes to prove is, that studying with 
a class-mate lessens the amount of 
knowledge gained by each student. In 
studying together one student sug- 
gests things which the other would 



have unravelled himself. Most of the 
hints and suggestions given by one 
student to the other pass in one ear 
and out of the other. They by no 
means leave the impressions that 
would J.'c made if sti c'enis would have 
to work hard and dig out the lesson 
themselves. One student hands over 
his remarks and the other one takes 
tl em in without effort, and anything 
vhat is received without any exertion 
will soon afterward be forgotten. 
'Jake for .'.n exan'.ple a jnoblem in 
mathematics. Some students have 
perseverance enough to work for hours 
at one problem ; that is the problem 
that will help them, develop them and 
make them stronger for the next test. 
But if that problem had been solved 
by another student, those very stu- 
dents would have the problem solved 
onl}' on paper. It would soon be for- 
gotten, and no benefits would be de- 
rived from it. Another example is Lat- 
in or any foreign language. When the 
average students study Latin in part- 
nership, the one that already knows a 
portion of the lesson is the one that 
will read that part and the other stu- 
dent will watch as he reads and get a 
glimpse into the constructions and 
the translation ; but it will be very 
little as compared to digging it out 
alone. Also, they usually take turns in 
looking up new constructions and 
definitions and only about half of the 
lesson is well mastered by each stu- 
dent. In studying lessons together the 
lesson is prepared in about half the 
time that it takes to study it alone, 
and necessarily it is about half as well 
mastered. 

The lesson as assigned by the teach- 
er is adjusted so that one student is 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



able to prepare it alone if he puts forth 
effort; so, there is nothing gained by 
two students going together to prepare 
lessons and learning the half, even if 
it doubles the number of branches the 
student can carry. For, if he masters 
the half only, he must come back 
some other time for the other half, in 
order to be a well rounded out student 
and a master of the subject. Now, if 
the student is in school to devote all 
his time, save the time for sleeping, 
eating and recreation in acquiring cul- 
ture, what is the value in carrying a 
program that is too heavy and doing 
his work half as a result of studying 
with another student? 

My last point is that it does not pre- 
pare one for after life. If the student 
is dependent on some one else in 
school to prepare his lessons and to 
give him ideas, when he leaves school 
and faces the struggles of life, he will 
fall. No one will tell him what to say 
and what to do ; but, on the other 
hand, he must act for himself. No one 
will solve his problems of life for him 
as his problems in mathematics were 
solved ; but he must "hoe his own 
row." He must form his own opinions. 



and answer for himself; but, if he did 
not do this in school, then he will fail 
to do it in after life. On the other 
hand, if he had studied his lessons 
without receiving outside help, then 
he would have received the full bene- 
fits from them and would be fitted to 
cope with the problems of life. 

Therefore, by considering these six 
facts that the affirmative side has 
demonstrated, I think it is self-evident 
that the student defeats the purpose 
for which he came to school if he 
studies all his branches with class- 
mates. If he comes to school to get 
knowledge, why is it necessary to get 
it in a half-handed way, and as quickly 
and as easily as possible when it can 
be acquired with more benefit? Why 
should he not concentrate and dig out 
the lessons himself, study hard and 
thoughtfully, and form his opinions 
rather than accept the half understood 
ideas of another? Why should a stu- 
dent not master his subjects himself, 
and be independent in his ideas when 
he leaves school and mingles with the 
world where he must think and act 
for himself? 



Naff Recital 



An interested audience of music 
lovers greeted Mr. Edward D. Natf m 
song recital on the evening of March 
20, in Music Hall. 

Mr. Naii' is a noted l)arilor.c, and an 
artist of exceptional ability. He is the 
possessor of an unusually sweet and 
mellow voice, which he uses with per- 
fect ease, even in executing the most 
difficult passages. 

'I'he pianist of the evening was Miss 



Mary E. Foreman of Mercersbur<j, 
Pa., who played Mr. Naff"s accompani- 
ments. Miss Foreman is a graduate ' 
in piano from Irving College where 
.-hu received the honors of her class. 

The Music Department was fortun- 
ate indeed in securing these artists, I 
for it is an essential part of one's mu- | 
sical education to listen to the best in 
mu'iic. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Spare Moments. 



(Continued from March Number 



IF I had my college days to live 
over again, I would not sim- 
ply try to make a general 
average of eighty-five per cent in reci- 
tation and devote the many spare 
minutes and hours to out-side in- 
terests. No student will ever regret 
having attempted the mastery of the 
tasks assigned him. Work at College, 
whether good, bad or indifferent, is a 
kind of index to the quality of work 
that will be done in his chosen voca- 
tion, after he leaves school. No student 
in after years will ever have cause to 
grie\-e that he became well founded 
in the first principles of knowledge, 
If those of you who are entering Col- 
lege for the first time will mind your 
college business and your spare mo- 
ments for wholesome recreation, 
school intercourse, and generel brows- 
ing in clean, inspiring and healthful 
literature, you will form habits that 
will cling to you through your College 
life and will go with you when vou 
leave here 

Don't shirk any branch in your 
course of study. Every branch, how- 
ever distasteful, is designed to help 
you. For discipline and training, the 
studies you naturally detest but are 
bound to master, will help you most. 
When I was in College, I simply ab- 
horred an3'thing by the name of 
mathematics and devoted only enough 
study to the same to pass examina- 
tions. Today I regret with pain that 
the very branches of study I neglected 



are the ones which would now help 
me most in concentration and power 
of analytic reasoning. Since I am out 
of college, I have been obliged to form 
habits of work and of thought that 
■ would have become second nature had 
I given strict attention to College busi- 
ness. 

A College is not intended to cram 
your head with knowledge of an in- 
different sort. It is meant to give you 
a perfect survey of the most important 
facts and examples of human learning, 
and what is more important, the Col- 
lege Course is so arranged as to teach 
you how to think, how to use your 
brains to the best purpose. Whatever 
you learn, learn well. One year well 
spent in College is worth a full course 
carelessly spent. By all means get 
facts, but learn how to make them 
your own and apply them. Do not at- 
tempt too much outside of your 
regular work; but beware of the loss 
of spare moments. Learn all you can 
of Latin and Greek, for useful in them- 
selves, a knowledge of these two 
tongues helps us the better to under- 
stand and appreciate our own beloved 
English. 

Above all else, learn to speak and 
write a simple, clear, and beautiful 
English. The best in this direction is 
not only the learning of rules in Gram- 
mar, but the careful reading of what 
is elevating and wholesome, in its 
matchless literature. Better than any 
other book is the Holy Bible. Not 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



only should it be read and studied as 
the Word of God which contains the 
Truths unto Salvation, but also as the 
Book of all Books for the beauty of its 
language, — the standard of all English 
speech. Read other books but let them 
be few and of the best. Don't despise 
a book because it is old and not popu- 
lar as the latest novel. The best books 
are the old ones, for they are not only 
the purest in style but also the most 
elevating in thought. Be modern 
enough to read the newspapers and 
magazines, but let their number be 
limited. Go to your teachers for ad- 
vice. They are not mere ornaments, 
they are here to help you. 

Next to the English language, de- 
vote your attention to the German 
tongue,— the tongue of your forefath- 
ers and the language that all well edu- 
cated people today must know. Learn 
the very best German as found in 
Martin Luther's translation of the 
Bible, the one book that has influenced 



Tyndale's translation of the Bible into 
English more than any other. 

Learn other modern langutiges, es- 
pecially the Spanish if you can, the 
language used by about sixty million 
people in Mexico, and in Central and 
South America. 

Learn to make the best use of your 
spare moments. Improve your health 
of body and remember that time which 
is devoted to the development of the 
powers of physical endurance is not 
wasted tirpp. 

Above all else, devote your best 
time and thought to the interests of 
your immortal souls. Better than a 
great though ungodly scholar, is a 
humble and sincere child of God ; but 
greater than either is a great scholar 
and a good Christian in one person. 
Be diligent in the performance of your 
greatest duties; and do not forget to 
keep a watchful eye upon your spare 
moments. 



Religious Appointments 

Regular Preaching Services: — 

March 3, 10.30 a. m. Sermon— Dr. D. 
C. Reber. subject— The Call of the 
Fisherman, 

March 10, 7.30 p. m. Sermon — Harry 
Mohler, subject — "Thought." 

March 17, 10.30 a. m. Sermon— Eld. 
S. Hertzler, subject — "The Law of 
tho T.rn-'l." Text. Ps, 1Q:7. 

Christian Workers' Meeting, Feb. 
25. 

Missionarv Program — Leader. B. 
F. Waltz. 

March 10 — Leader, Jacob Myers. 

Prayer Meetings: — 

Feb. 21 — Leader, Lillian Becker. 



Feb. 21— Leader, R. C .MacKley. 

Feb. 28— Leader, Edna Brubaker. 

;\Iarch 6 — Leader, Miss Leah Sheaf- 
fer. 

March 13 — Leader — Harry Moyer. 

March 20— Leader, Wm. Kulp. 

Sunday School Lesson, 8:15 a. m. 

Teachers. Miss Stauffer, Prof. Har- 
ley. 

Prayer Class 7:15. Sunday a. m. 
Taught by Miss Stauffer. 

Reading Circle — Saturdav evening, 
6 :30. 

President — B. F. Waltz. 

Teacher — Miss Stauffer. 

Reading — "The Unfinished Task." 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13^ 



-'-'-J 




Spring-time 
For winter's rain and ruins are over, 
And all the season of snows and 
sins; 
The days dividing lover and lover, 
The light that loses, the night that 
wins ; 
And time remembered is grief for- 
gotten, 
And frosts are slain and flowers be- 
gotten, 
And in green underwood and cover 
Blossom by blossom the spring 
begins. 
; Algernon Charles Swinburne. 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 
April 12 — Arbor Day Program 

The following program has been 
arranged by the Senior class for the 
celebration of Arbor Day, Friday 
afternoon, April 12th : — 

l\Iusic, Class Quartette; President's 
Address, — Walter F. Eshleman; Reci- 
tation, Ava Witmer; Essay, Irene 
Sheetz; Vocal Sojo, Christ Martin; 
Oration, Orville Becker; Address, By 
a member of the Department of For- 
estry; Planting of the Tree; Music, 
Class. 

April 12. — Anniversary of the Key- 
stone and Homerian Literarv Societies 



to be held in the College Chapel in 
the evening. Dr. J. F. Stanley, of 
Xewburg on the Hudson, will be the 
principal speaker on this occasion. His 
subject will be: "Developments in 
China." 

Let all former students feel it their 
duty to encourage us with their pres- 
ence on the occasion of the anniversary 
of the Literary Societies each year. 

April 18.— Dr. J. F. Stanley's lec- 
ture — The Supremacy of the Pacific — 
Occidental or Oriental — The Pivotal 
Question of the Century. 

We were much pleased with the 
representation of alumni and other 
former students at the Anniversary of 
the Dedication of the College Build- 
ings on March 4. 

As we go to press on the April is- 
sue, all are busy with examinations 
and with bright anticipations for a va- 
cation of three days. 

How many trees will be planted on: 
the College campus on Arbor Day? 

Be on the lookout for the Governor's 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Arbor Day Proclamation. Who'll be 
the first to find it in our current 
papers? Two days are usually chosen 
for planting trees, the one in the for- 
mer, and the other in the latter part of 
April. Let us each plant a tree. We 
should' all encourage the planting of 
trees and shrubbery because of their 
aesthetic, as well as their utilitarian 
value. 

The Spring Term opened March 25. 
with clear, cold weather. The new 
schedule shows some seventy classes 
reciting daily, besides the special work 
in Voice, Piano, Organ, and Sewing. 

Classes in review work for Teachers 
whose object is to prepare for County 
Teachers examination are special 
features for this term. 

Conditions in China are deplorable. 
Persons who are interested in hearing 
the reasons for these conditions, the 
proprecies as to what the outcome 
may be, should not fail to hear Dr. 
Stanley who will lecture on this sub- 
ject in the Chapel on the evening of 
April 12. Come to hear him ! 

Our hearts were \'ery much sadden- 
ed recently on hearing of the death of 
Bro. G. M. Lauver, which occurred at 



his home near Chicago on Sunday, 
March 17. Those of our College 
friends who attended the Bible Term 
of 1910 will remember the excellent 
instruction given by Bro. Lauver on 
"The Holy Spirit" and on "Prayer," 
besides the impressive doctrinal ser- 
mons on "Feet-washing," "The Lord's 
Supper," "The Communion," "The 
Prayer Veil," etc. 

This is what the "Gospel Messen- 
ger" says about him : — Our people 
will certainly miss Bro. Lauver. He 
was not only earnest and self-sacri- 
ficing, but he was a man of consider- 
able scholarship. Few men among us 
had a better acquaintance with Biblic- 
al literature. Ecclesiastical History, 
however, was his specialty. For some 
}ears he taught Greek, had a good 
knowledge of Latin, and had given 
considerable attention to Hebrew. No 
one ever questioned his consecration, 
his loyalty to the church, or his ability 
as a preacher and a teacher. 

He was only a little over forty years 
old, and leaves a consecrated wife and 
four children." 

( )ur College Times extends our 
warmest sympathy to the bereaved 
family and to his friends at Bethany 
Bible School, at which place he was 
employed as teacher up to the time of 
his death. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




You most Sup 



After the extreme cold days of win- 
ter, the blithe, warm air of spring is 
much appreciated by the College 
folks. 

Our steward, Mr. Dennis, has al- 
ready raked the matted, dead grass 
from parts of the campus, and bright 
spots of green are visible here and 
there. 

With the opening of the Spring 
Term came a number of changes. Miss 
Mary Sheaffer has taken a room at 
Dr. Reber's where she assists Mrs. Re- 
ber in her household duties, in con- 
nection with her studies at the Col- 
lege. 

During the last few weeks of the 
Winter Term there were visitors ga- 
lore, — old students, prospective stu- 
dents, and friends who had never visit- 
ed us before. Among these were Mrs. 
Dr. H. R. Hermany, of Mahanoy City, 
Pa. She visited her niece. Miss Annie 
Louise Mathias, of Philadelphia, who 
has been a student here for several 
terms. 

yiv. Isaac Kreider, of Lebanon, a 
graduate of Millersville Normal School 
has enrolled for college work this 
term. 

The social hour given to the stu- 



dents every Friday evening after 
Literary Society during the Winter 
Term was quite interesting and help- 
ful to those who participated in the 
same. 

Our Seniors are already thinking of 
Commencement. Subjects for Com- 
mencement orations have been as- 
signed and advisors appointed. 

Elder J. Calvin Bright, of Brook- 
ville, Ohio, a member of the Educa- 
tional Board of the Church of the 
Brethren conducted Chapel exercises 
at the College on Monday, February 
19. 

Marriages 

We are sorry to be so late in report- 
ing the marriage of Mr. Howard F. 
Hollinger of Elizabethtown, who was 
a student here in the winter of 1904 
and '05. We learned only a few weeks 
ago that on October 29, he was united 
in marriage with Miss Ruth M. Ober, 
of Elizabethtown, and they are now 
at housekeeping on East High street. 
Mr. Hollinger is a promising young 
business man. He is assistant superin- 
tendent of the Gas Works, and also 
Secretary of the Business Man's Asso- 
ciation of Elizabethtown. 

Another announcement of interest 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



to our students is the marriage of Mr. 
J. Grant Cohick to Elsie Mae Longen- 
ecker which occurred on Wednesday, 
February 14. This wedding took place 
in New York City in the famous Little 
Church Around the Corner. The card 
says : — 

"At home after February the twenty 
fourth, "Dream Wold Farm," Bain- 
bridge, Pennsylvania." 

Our College Times extends hearty 
congratulations to all these young 
people. 

Keystone Literary Society 
The K. L. S. met in regular Literary 
Session Feb. 17. Although the meet- 
ings have been somewhat scattered 
our members did not forget when we 
really were to have a meeting. The 
chief features of the program were: 
the readings, "A Little Hatchet Story" 
by Harry Moyer and "Spartacus to the 
Gladiators" by W. K. I\ulp ; Vocal 
Solo by Harry Shank and the Literary 
Ilcho. 

Friday evening, Feb. 23, we had 
election of officers. The new officers 
are: President, Albert L. Reber; Vice 
President, Ava Witmer; Editor, C. L. 
Martin ; Critic, Walter F. Eshleman. 

On the evening of March 1, after the 
President's inaugural address on 
"Making Citizens," the following 
Patriotic Program was rendered : Song 
— America, by the Society, Paper — 
Revolutionary Patriots, Harry Royer, 
Song — Star Spangled Banner, Society, 
Paper — History of the .A.merican Flag, 
George NefF, Paper, — Great Patriots 
of the the World, H. H. Nye, Paper- 
Great Patriotic Women, Irene Wise. 



Literary Echo, Song — Columbia, So- 
ciety. 

On March 8 the program was en- 
livened by the "College Hill Quartet" 
who again appeared after a long period 
of silence. They gave four excellent se- 
lections, the one entitled "Eggs for 
your Breakfast," being especially well 
received. 

The Society has been showing an 
advance along the line of debating. 
The debates have been very interest- 
ing and instructive. Some of the 
questions which were debated lately 
were: Resolved, "That the Editor 
wields more power than the Orator. 
Resolved, "That Wealth is a Greater 
Promoter of Progress Than Poverty." 

l"he winter term has now closed and 
we fully realize that the schol year is 
rapidly passing and that our opportum"- 
ries for bettering ourselves and es- 
pecially by society work are becommg 
fewer. We regret that so many of our 
students and society members could 
not remain with us for the Spring 
term. But we are glad that some of 
our old acquaintances have returned 
to help keep the work moving. We 
also extend a hearty welcome to the 
new students and invite them to come 
and enjoy our meetings with us and, 
of course, ])ecome active members of 
the Society. 

Homerian News 

THe Homerian Literary Society 
rendered an interesting and 
instructive program at its 
regular public meeting held on Friday 
evening, March 15. 1912. Prof. Harley 
the chaplain, opened the program 
with a short, fitting prayer. A duet 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



was then given from "David the Shep- 
herd Boy." Prof. Schlo.sser represented 
the character of David and Prof. Gish 
that of Jonathan. Miss Leah Sheaffer 
next recited "The Pied Piper of Hame- 
lin," from Robert Browning, in a very 
pleasing manner. A debate followed. 
The question was, "Resolved, That 
Unanimity of Verdict ought to be 
Eliminated from the Jury System." It 
was debated affirmatively by Mr. R. 
■C. MacKley and Prof. Schlosser; and 
negatively by Mr. C. M. Nef? and 
Prof. W. K. Gish. Both sides were 
well discussed. 

The debate was followed by music, 
"Blow, Balmy Breeze," by the Ladies' 
•quartet. Mr, Resser then gave an ora- 
tion on the subject "America," and 
lastly the criticisms by Miss Myer, the 
•critic, were given. The critic thought 
it would be a good thing if the Pied 
Piper would visit the Ladies' Halls of 
E'town College and relieve them of the 
pesty little mice that disturb the peace 
of the girls so much. 

Chapel Talk 
On March 7, it became the pleasant 
( ?) duty of Prof. Herr to take his turn 
in giving a Chapel Talk. He began 
with the words of the quarterly cry of 
the class in Elocution, "I come not 
here to talk." I want to give you some- 
thing in which all should be interested. 
Tt is the subject of morality. In many 
•colleges the textbook is on the throne 
and the teaching of morals is neglect- 
ed. The importance of developing the 
moral side of man, as well as the 
physical and intellectual, may be seen 
in the fact that each day of our lives 
we are obliged many times to decide 



between right and wrong — between 
the good and evil. 

"One reason why we do not at the 
present have a higher standard of 
morality is because the home training 
isn't what it used to be years ago. The 
morals of our boys and girls are not 
as carefully guarded as they should be. 
The discipline in the home is too lax 
and restrictions are too scarce . Our 
young people are taught to make 
mone}-- honestly if they can, but by all 
means make money. When a }'-oung 
man is shrewd in making bargains that 
are not exactly honest, yet bring him 
wealth, he is commended for his cute 
business pranks or principles, and this 
is why there are so many weaklings in 
society. 

"Young people should be taught to 
see the right, to feel the right, and to 
will to do the right. I don't give any- 
thing for the person who can read Lat- 
in and Greek and dream in Hebrew, 
and yet does not have a good, moral 
character. If you as students do not 
get hold of the mandates of truth and 
honest}', right and justice, you have 
missed your calling, and will never be 
trulv successful in life." 



The Sewing Department 

The members of the Sewing Classes 
are manifesting good interest in their 
work. 

During the winter term plain skirts 
were drafted and made. From the 
plain draft we made many designs in 
skirts. They consist of plaited skirts, 
skirts with circular and plaited 
flounces attached, and also circular 
skirts. 

We will begin making coats, in- 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



eluding children's coats, at the open- 
ing of the spring term. 

This course in sewing teaches the 
individual to construct garments from 
the adult to the infant. 

One of the ladies having devoted 
much of her time to the work, has al- 
ready finished the course for this 
year. 

Eleventh Anniversary 

ALthough the weather was 
none of the fairest, yet the 
College Chapel was filled with an ap- 
preciative audience that gathered to 
hear our Anniversary program, com- 
memorative of the Dedication of the 
College buildings. 

The exercises were opened with 
prayer by Eld. G. N. Falkenstein, who 
substituted for Eld. L W. Taylor, of 
Nefifsville. This was followed by a 
song, "When I think upon Thy 
Ways," by Misses Elizabeth Kline, 
Leah M. Sheaflfer, Kathryn E. Miller, 
Nora L. Reber, and Messrs. W. K. 
Gish, R. \^^ Schlosser, C. M. NefT, B. 
F. Waltz. We were obliged to dis- 
pense with the Reading prepared by 
Miss Stauffer on account of her not 
being well. "Annie Laurie" was then 
sung by the Ladies' Quartet. Elder 
H. C. Early, of Virginia, now Pastor 
of the Church of the Brethren in 
Washington, D. C, then gave the 
principal address of the evening. 

Bro. Early's theme was the Present 
and Future of the Schools and Col- 
leges under the Auspices of the 
Church of the Brethren. He spoke of 
the twelve schools already in existence 
which are as follows: — Juniata and 
Elizabethtown Colleges in Pa., Bridge- 
water and Daleville Colleges, and 



Hebron Seminary in Virginia; Union 
Bridge, Maryland; Mount Morris Col- 
lege, Illinois ; North Manchester, 
Indiana ; McPherson, Kansas ; Lords- 
burg College, California ; Bethany Bi- 
ble School, Chicago ; and the Berean 
Bible School, Los Angeles, California. 

"These schools were established 
that we might furnish our children 
with Christian education under im- 
mediate surrounding influences which 
foster the principles of our Church. 
When young men and women are edu- 
cated in Colleges that do not breathe 
an infiuence of Christianity, they are 
lost to the Church and may even be- 
come skeptics or infidels. 

"It is a settled fact that our child- 
ren will go to school. It is also a fact 
that we must have trained workers in 
the home churches and in foreign 
fields; and these workers must come 
up through the schools. True it is, 
that we have our influential Church 
Fathers in the past who have been 
self-made men and who have accom- 
jjlished much for the Church. But 
consecrated men cannot accomplish 
today what they did accomplish in 
days gone by unless they are special- 
ly trained and educated. These train- 
ing schools must be supported if it 
takes all the money we have to the 
limit of our farms and stocks. If we 
think more of our money than we do 
of our boys and girls, surely the cause- 
of Christ will suff'er untold loss in fu- 
ture generations. 

"The greatest need in the Church of 
the Brethren today is for trained 
workers in the home church and in 
the home field. Chilren should be 
taught to do all possible for the best 
interests of the old home churches. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



There are 35,000,000 of Church 
members in the United States, just 
-about one-third of the whole popula- 
tion; the other two-thirds are un- 
christianized. The rate of increase in 
Church membership is less than 2 per 
■cent, yearly. What will become of this 
great nation of ours; unless we have 
active, trained church members, who 
will be able to lend a strong influence 
for the support of Christianity in this 
beloved country of ours?" 

Brother Early encouraged in the 
strongest terms possible the support 
of the institution of the home. It is 
the oldest institution of the world; and 
when the influences of the home are 
right, then the foundation of the gov- 
ernment is sure. Marriage was also 
strongly encouraged by him but the 
caution given not to plunge blindly in- 
to parentage. Physical culture was 
highly recommended, but the state- 
ment was made that the General 
Board of Education of the Church of 
the Brethren have placed themselves 
on record as being opposed to Inter- 
collegiate Contests in the way of ath- 
letics. 



The Summer Term 

The fifth Summer Term at Eliza- 
bethtown College is scheduled to open 
July the first and to continue six 
weeks. 

Wm — The Summer Term offers ex- 
cellent opportunities to improve the 
summer vacation and seeks to accomo- 
date students pursuing regular courses 
in the College and also teachers of the 
Public Schools who are aiming to 
finish a course of study without stopp- 
ing to teach. By attending both the 
Spring and Summer Terms, nearly one 



half year's work may be done by a stu- 
dent who applies himself. College Pre- 
paratory students and even regular 
College students will find a splendid 
opportunity which they should not 
neglect to improve. 

Instruction — A student may pursue 
only three studies of the elementary 
branches or two studies in College 
Preparatory and College branches. 
The recitations last one hour. The 
studies offered are Ancient and Mod- 
ern languages, mathematics, pedagogy 
and history. Credit will be given for 
work that is completed during the 
Summer Term. 

Expenses — The tuition in prepara- 
tory subjects is ten dollars and in 
iregular College branches, fifteen 
dollars, payable on or before July 26. 
Text-books may be rented or pur- 
chased at the College bookroom. Stu- 
dents may room at the College at 
catalogue rates. Boarding may be se- 
cured at- the College dining-room, 
arrangements for which may be made 
with Mrs. E. G. Reber, matron. Stu- 
dents will have free access to College 
library and reading room as well as 
the use of tennis court and gymnasium 
for recreation. 

For further information, apply to 
the President. 



Good English 

Five or six points in the study of 
English will tend to general watchful- 
ness. It is far more elegant to say, "I 
am much better, I thank you," tnan to 
say, "I am a great deal better, thank 
you." Great deals are made only on 
the stock exchange. Before the intro- 
duction of steamboat and locomotive, 
men had time to think before they 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



spoke. With these introductions and 
consequent speed, came man's general 
hurry, and in that American hurry he 
ceases to say, "I thank you," or 
even "Thank you," and now says," 
"Thanks." 

We give thanks to God. We should 
say, "I thank you," to human beings. 

The babe learning to speak English, 
uses the strong, simple words to ex- 
press his needs. With what delight 
the mother hears the first word spoken 
by the infant ! How every new word 
acquired gives the little one joy. It is 
consciovis of new power. It will re- 
peat the new word over and over 
again, and scream with laughter. 
Nothing in after life gives' it greater 
amusement. Those words are almost 
unintelligible, yet they express his 
thought. Months pass by. Now he 
can use more than one, a group or 
idiom. They, too, are crude expres- 
sions, but they convey his thought. 
One day he goes to school. His teach- 
er tells him his expressions have no 
meaning. He repeats after her the 
correct one, and at once corrects it. 
Not even to please her, does he remem- 
ber. Why should he; every one has 
always understood him? Finding 
fault with his language is the same as 
telling him he is too short, or not old 
enough. 

Crude, rough words express cor- 
rectly the same kind of thought. When 
a child wishes to consider the rights 
of others, to be unselfish, he says, 
"Please give me one," and "I would 
rather not," instead of "Gimme one," 
and "Shan't, neither." Later he learns 
to read the thoughts of others, and as 
fast as he assimilates those thoughts, 
he gains in power of expression. 



Hence we see good, refined manners- 
are prompted by pure thought. 

It is the belief of a certain teacher 
that no matter what the environment 
at home, children can be taught to use 
correct and elegant English, so that 
when they shall have given eight 
years attention to the study of Eng- 
lish, they will be cultured boys and 
girls. For, after all, the use of the 
mother tongue is the measure of a 
man's true culture. A man may have 
the profoundest knowledge, yet if he 
tells of that knowledge in crude Eng- 
lish, our opinion of him is, that he is 
not a truly learned man. Pres. War- 
field of Lafayette College once said, 
"If a man is to be a lawyer or a minis- 
ter of the Gospel, every one s-ces 
clearly enough his need of mastery in 
spoken and written discourse." It is 
c:[ually important to a man of busi- 
ness, the engineer, and the physician. 
A business man may have more at 
stake in a page of a letter than a law- 
yer may have in fifty pages. The page 
of that business letter should be so 
clearly conceived, .so accurately ex- 
pressed, that any contract made upon 
it should be beyond all doubt and con- 
troversy. The plans and specifications 
of an engineer or architect require 
clear and correct statements, and too 
often possess neither. 

P>ut quite beyond mere business af- 
fairs, a man's speech, his letters, his 
use of language should be a true ex- 
pression of himself. A man who is 
straight forward and clear cut in 
character, should be able to make men 
know it by what he writes and speaks ; 
a man who is gentle and kindly dis- 
posed, should know how to make his 
tongue utter the goodness of his heart ; 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



a man who lives in the sunshine of 
God's love should know how to speak 
a word in season, which will shed 
some of that sunshine on the path of 
others. 

A friend of Our College Times has 
called the attention of the editor to a 
morning prayer published in a month- 
ly journal called "The Trained 
Nurse;" and since Elizabethtown Col- 
lege stands for the high ideals of 
Christian education, we feel that it 
may be helpful to publish this beauti- 
ful prayer among our editorials. It is 
as follows: — "Look very tenderly up- 
on me this day, Gracious Lord, and 
strengthen my heart with Thy love, 
that my hands may be strong for Thy 
service. Help me to follow the ways 
of peace and to cultivate with dili- 



gence the art of being kind. May I 
leave no little kindness undone while 
waiting for an opportunity to do some 
great thing. Teach me how to give a 
cup of cold water in Jesus' name. Help 
me to quench somebody's thirst; to 
cool some fevered brow ; to bathe the 
temples of the faint; to refresh some- 
body who is weary. Teach my lips to 
speak words of love, of tenderness, of 
courtesy. Help me now to do the thing 
that needs to be done now, making the 
most of each golden moment as the 
priceless gift of Thy love. And all 
through the day, let me serve Thee 
and my fellowmen with joy, and with 
a gentle hand; and whatsoever may 
befall, may my heart be kept tender 
with the thought of Thy goodness to 
me." — Edward Leigh Peel. - 




22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




Alumni Notes 
Another month gone. More Alumni 
items desired. What are our Alumni 
doing? Send us a card if you want 
your successes published. 

Think of it Alumni! Spring Term 
is here! Commencement is coming! 
Alumni day is not long distant! Be on 
the lookout for an invitation to the 
supper! Every member of the Associa- 
tion should be planning to come. 
Every Alumnus should be a member. 
If you are not, and want to join, write 
to the President. Do it at once so that 
you will be entitled to a place at the 
supper. 

Good news has just reached our 
ears. Another Alumnus going to the 
Foreign field! Mr. Chas. Shoop will 
finish a theological course at the Theo- 
logical Seminary of the United Breth- 
ren Church at Dayton, Ohio, this 
coming spring and will then give his 
life as a missionary to China. 

Surely we wish him God speed in 
the good work. 

The executive committee are gett- 
ing busy. The program for the public 
meeting, no doubt, will soon be ready. 



Another Alumnus has sent in a sub- 
scription to Our College Times. We 
hardly knew what became of Mrs. 
Nellie Hartman Schuler, but she evi- 
dently is still alive. 

Have you all heard of the new name 
added to the cradle roll? Galen Henry 
Schlosser's name was entered Feb. 28. 
Ever since the advent Prof. Schlosser's 
face has been one big, broad smile. 

Prof. Ober visited Waynesboro re- 
cently where he saw a number of Al- 
umni and he reports them all at work, 
earnestly engaged-in sincere service to 
their employers and to the Church. He 
brought back a photograph of baby 
Dick. He surely is a fine boy. Waldo 
will, we hope, become a good strong 
man. 

Miss Mary Myers will be a student 
here during the Spring Term and Ag- 
nes M. Ryan is also expected. Harry 
Longenecker will also be here. This 
is a substantial loyalty to E'town. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Breitigan have 
given a home to a little five-year old- 
girl who was without a home. This is 
a noble deed and a worthy example of 
benevolence. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



A few Alumni were here to enjoy 
the Anniversary exercises. More 

should have been present to hear Eld. 
H. C. Early's excellent address. 

Elizabeth Kline recently sang at an 
evangelistic service in the Church of 
God at Rohrerstown. She also has or- 
ganized a singing class with fifty 
members, in the Church of the Breth- 
ren at Lancaster. 

A letter was received from Kathryn 
Ziegler, recently, in which she tells 
how the Dhobie takes their laundry 
and washes it. He puts it in a large 
bag and throws it over his bullock's 
back. She sa3's : 

"Our clothes are taken to a large 



tank of water and if you would see the 
process of washing you would wonder 
that there are any clothes left and 
sometimes they are not in very good 
condition when they come back. They 
wet and soap them and then beat them 
on a stone or lay them on a stone and 
beat them with a wooden club. They 
come out beyond expectation, still we 
do not consider it a treat, but have to 
be satisfied, as in this hot climate we 
would not be able to do it. 

This dhobie is not a Christian but 
we believe in his association with the 
Christians that many good impressions 
have been made and that he may yet 
be numbered among God's children." 



What Steam Is 

At a railway station an old lady 
said to a very pompous looking gentle- 
man, who was talking about steam 
communication, — Pray Sir, what is 
steam?" "Steam, ma'am, is-ah, eh! ah! 
steam is steam." I knew that chap 
couldn't tell ye, said a rough looking 
fellow standing by, "but steam is a 
bucket of water in a tremendous per- 
spiration." 



A gentleman makes no noise ; a lady 
is serene. — Emerson. 



A preacher called at a house and 
asked to stay all night. The good wo- 
man told him that they could not take 
him in. He insisted, but in vain. At 
length he said, "Well, of course, if I 
must go on, I will ; but I remind you 
of that passage in the Bible which 
says, "We ought to entertain strang- 
ers, for thereby some have entertained 
angels unawares." "I am not afraid of 
your being an angel," replied the wo- 
man ; "an angel doesn't smoke or chew 
and spit tobacco, as you do." — Dr. 
-Steel. 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




^IfM^K-.- Lr^.^^J ....... i-. J. Jti«...,.-,l, «««.«l«w,r^L.. «« i»r.KW;iLr -k 



A light was low, the oil nigh spent, 
And o'er his table one was bent ; 
His pencil dropped upon the floor, — 
In vain he tried to read some more 
Exchanges 
Then flaming eyes and creeping 

things, 
And ghastly nymphs with outstretched 
wings ; 
Some fairly shrieked while others 

roared, 
He heard them shout with one ac- 
cord : 

Exchanges. 

The time was short, his work was due, 

Once more he strove to read them 

through, 

A lesson learnt from vision past ; 

He ne'er again will leave till last, 

Th' Exchanges. 

The Red Man is quite an instructive 
paper as it gives us the news of the 
Carlisle Indian School. We wish to 
congratulate them for the attractive 
and appropriate cuts and photographs 
in their magazine. - The mechanical 



part of the paper is especially com- 
mendable. "How Education is solving 
the Indian Problem" gives us a deep- 
er insight into the condition of the 
native Red man. 

College Student has such good 
articles in its March issue that we 
cannot refrain from commenting upon 
them. "Social Hygiene," a timely sub- 
ject written by a Doctor of Medicine, 
should be read and practiced by every 
man attending college. In "Impossi- 
bilities" the author gives the pessi- 
mistic view of several problems in 
America. 

In English Class — "What do you 
know of Minerva?" 

Meredith— "She was the Goddess of 
wisdom ; she never married." 

"But the whole man today is he who 
has developed himself in harmony 
both with science and theology, and 
instead of seeing them opposed to 
each other, they blend into a grand 
and perfect whole. To him life is 
fuller and broader and the world at 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



large is at unison ; science has received 
an impetus and religion is broader and 
deeper with a more glorious mean- 
ing." — Philomathean Monthly. 

"Yis, sirh, our household now rep- 
resints de whole United Kingdom," 
said Pat;" I am Irish, me wife's 
English, de servants gal is Scotch, an 
de baby wails." 

A professor in a well known Ohio 
college once suspected three members 
of his class to be addicted to the 
"translation" habit. One day, when 
his suspicion had become firmly 
founded, he startled the class by de- 
manding, "Will the three cavalrymen 
in the rear of the room ride forward 
and dismount?" Ex. 

"Are you Hungary?" 

"Yes, Siam." 

"Well, come along, I'll Fiji." Ex. 

Paradise — Bachelor. 

Paradise Lost — Married. 

Paradise Regained — Widower. — Ex. 

"Probably nothing else in a man's 
life requires more thought and con- 



sideration than the choice of a pro- 
fession. Everybody has certain gifts 
which, if developed will qualify him 
for a certain profession. It is therefore 
necessary that we consider our talents 
and learn to know the kind of work 
for which we are best fitted. To many 
men their work is a continuous labor; 
in spite of their best efforts they are 
unable to carry out their undertaking, 
all because they missed their true vo- 
cation." — M. H. Aerolith. 

We acknowledge the following ex- 
changes with thanks; Delaware Col- 
lege Review, Juniata Echo, The Red 
Man, Washington Collegian, M. H. 
Aerolith, Philomathean Monthly, Col- 
lege Rays, College Student, Western 
Maryland College Monthly, Linden 
Hall Echo, Albright Bulletin, Lords- 
burg College Educator, Berean Work- 
er, Tempe Normal Student, Ursinus 
Weekly, Daleville Leader, Rays of 
Light, Targum, Grove City Collegian, 
Gett3'sburgian, Susquehanna, College 
Folio, Purple and Gold, Carlisle Ar- 
row. Red and Black. 



^ 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Faculty 



D. C. REBER, A. M., Pd. D., President 
Philosophy, Pedagogy, German. 

H. K. OBER, Pd. B., Vice-President. 
Biological Science, Agriculture, 
Surveying. 

ELIZABETH MYER, M. E., 
Reading and Grammar. 

J. G. MEYER, Pd. B., A. B., Secretary, 
Mathematics, Physical Science, 
Greek. 

J. Z. HERR, Prin. Commercial Dept., 
Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Com- 
mercial Law. 

JACOB S. HARLEY, A. B., 

Algebra, German and Civics. 

LYDIA STAUFFER, 
English Bible. 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Pd. B., 
Piano, Orogan, Drawing. 



R. W. SCHLOSSER, Pd. B., A. B., 

English, Latin, French. 
KATIE E. MILLER, 

Director of Vocal Music, Voice 

Culture. 
ELIZABETH KLINE, 

Piano, Voice. 
ANNA W. WOLGEMUTH, 

Shorthand and Typewriting. 
W. K. GISH, Pd. B., 

U. S. History. 
C. E. RESSER, 

Geography, History and Mathe- 
matics. 
LAURA B. HESS, 

Sewing. 
DAISY P. RIDER, Pd. B., 

(Absent on Leave.) 
ELD. S. H. HERTZLER, 

Exegesis (Bible Term.) 



50 N. QUEEN ST. 

LANCASTER, PA. 



to give you m-^oes 

om $150To $l!bo? 
CLOCKS. Fr.m $300 chime clocks lo the alarm clock 
EYE-GLASSES and SI ECiACLES fitted to the eyes wii 
Oiir Manufacturing and Repairing Depa 
le in our own shop, by 



the Jewelry business. 



r own workmen — You a 



:s with no charge for examii-alion. 

not be excelled in Pennsylvania. Everything 

Iways welct me at Zook's Jewelry SUre. 



D. Walter Miesse 

The College and School Photographer 

INDIVIDUAL AND CROUP 



PORTRAITS 



Bell Telephone 2110,1 

24 WEST KING STREET, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



27 



GEO. R. KERSEY A"" 



DENTIST 



ELEZABETHTOWN, - PBNNA. 

TOOTH BRUSHES, FLESH BRUSHES, 
SPONGES, Etc. 

A. W. CAIN 

WE DO IT RIGHT 

Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES i®, SON 



A. R. LEI CHT 

Mannfactnrer of pi HO VeHJCleS 

Repainting and Repair Work Given Careful Attention 
EUZABETHTOWN, PA. 



^ College Jewelry of the Better Sort ■ 

iG.WmjSiEISNERl 

I I 

I Manufacturing | 

I Jeweler I 



Prize Cops 
Medals 



m Class Pins and Rings 

^ Fraternity Je-nrelry 

I LANCASTER, PA. | 

SiiiiiiiiinaiiiiaiiiiiBiiiniiiiaiiniHiiiiBiiiaiiiiiBiiiiiBniiaiiiiiBiiiiriir 



F. DISSINGER and H. H. CARMAN 
GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 
HORSESHOEING A SPBCIALTY 
North Market Street. ELIZABETH TOWN, PA. 



J. CROFF & SONS 

Meat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



LEO KOB 

Heating and 
I Plumbing { 

t EUZABETHTOWN, PA. I 

T ^ I ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ♦^M^^ ^ i ^ ^♦' ^ »♦♦^ t ■^ ^ ^ l ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 4 ^^ M ^^ I ^^ ^ ^♦»^^■ ^ ^ 



FRANK H. KELLER 

Dealer In Fancy and Staple Groceries 
Provisions, Etc. 

Our Higlnst Ambition to Please You. 

BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO SUPPLIES FOR SALE 

Centre Square 



i judges of good Ice Cream say that 

I Miesse's Ice Cream f 

* is the most Delicious and Satisfying % 

^ they bave eaten. Try it for yourself ^ 

* We serve Parties, Weddings, Dinners T 
I|| and Receptions witb cakes and ice cream 4. 

* with perfect satisfaction. * 

% D. W. MIESSE, 123 N. Queen St., Lancaster * 

4i Our Ice Cream sold in Elizabethtown by J. C. Gross •{> 

|4.^H^.^.^.^.■ ^ ■ ^» ■ ^ ■ ^ ■ » . ^ . ^ . ^ ■ ^» ■ ^ . I ■■ ^ ■^.. ^ . ^ .. ^ .■ ^„^ ■■ ^ ■^■» 



UP TO DATE 

Shaving and Hair Cutting 

R. H. SHISSLER. 



Chas. B. Dierolt 

DRUGGIST 

EUZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carelully Compounded 



28 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



/. E. BELSER I 

For Koofine, Spouting, Tin and a 

Granite Ware Milk Cans, Radi- S 

ators, PortableFurnaces, Granite * 

Lisk Roasters in four sizes, or |J 

any special orders in my line. ^ 

4J Give me a trial. T 

2 0pp. E.nchange Bank ^ 

$ ELIZ.\BETHTOWN, - PENNA. ^ 



I W. R. Ashenfelter | 

^ CHOICE BREAD AND ^ 

2 CAKES * 



2 Weddings ami Parties supplied with w 
? Fancy Cakes at short notice. » 

^ S. MARKET ST.. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA ^ 



First-Class Shoe Rjjepairing 

■Work Guaranteed Prices Reasonable 

RUBBER HEELS make WALKING EASY 
JOHN C. BERBERIAN, E. High St. 



H. H. BRAND7 t 

Dealer in * 

ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 



♦ ElizaboUitt 



E. L. RENSEL 

General Blacksmi thing 

and Repair Work 
Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

Park St., Elizabethtown, Pa 



Plain Snits, Ready-Made or Ordered, at 

ADOLPH GANSMAN'S 

Clothier 

is. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orangs St'., Lancaster, Pa. 
ELIZABETHTOWN 

Dental Parlors 

S. J. HETXDEL, DenUst. 



^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4 «^< 

ELIZABETHTOWN 

ROLLER MILLS 

J. F. BINKLEV, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades ot 
FLOUR AND FEED 

Highest Cash Prices paid for grain. 

hay and straw 

ELIZ.\BETHTOW\, - PENVA 



1912 




'""slSe.oo'""^ 5 AND IOC STORE 

RnnaboattSOO l^et us make your Nickels, Dimes and 

tiuarters dodmil)le duty. Nothing in the store 
is priced more than Ulc and from that down. 

M. W. ESHENOWER 
ElilZABETHTOWN. - PENNA. 



Folly Equipped at Above Prices 
Call on or Address 

S. NEWCOMER, - Mt. Joy, Pa. 



John A. Fisher 

BARBER 

Centre Square, • Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



Chas. R. Boggs, Restaurant 

First-Class tTWeals at All Hours 



O/'sters In Season 



Confectionery, Ice Cream 



S. G. HERSHEY : 



Groceries, Dry 

Goods and 

Notions 



For All Kinds of 
FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & McBride 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENJfA. 



ELIZABETHTOWN. 



JACOB FISHER 

Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Center Square, Elizabethtown, Penna. 

Wilh vou for 31 years. That's All 




Bell and Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 

Bast Orange St., liancaater. Pa 



CHOICE MEATS 

A. K. Young 

JJMZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Ind. Phone Hours 


8 to 6 


DR. JEROME G. HESS W 


^ 


DENTIST l| 

J 


If 


Hertzler Bldg. \\ 
Elizabethtown Pa. \] 


f 



Ebersole & Baney 

Dealers in 
Choice Groceries, Fine Grade of Teas and 

Coffees, Fresh Country Butter and Eggs 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Penna 

Grover Hefflefinger 

Shoes Repaired Shoes Shined 

Hats Cleaned 

S. Market St. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



For Up-toDate 

Furnishings 



Men, Women 

and Cblldren 



I. D. 
BENEMAN'S 

Dept. Store 
MT. JOY, - PA. 




30 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



THE 

$1.00 a Year 



''ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD'' 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 



Sample Copies Free 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 



ElilZABETHTOWN, 



Willow Grove 

Poultry Farm 

Emblem and Toulouse Geese, Indian Runner 

Ducks, Rose Combed Rhode Island 

Red Chickens 

STOCK FOR SALE AND EGGS IN SEASON 

DUROC JERSEY RED HOGS 

J. B. ALDINGER, 

R D. No 4 Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Go To 

GUY COCHNAUER'S 

Up-to-Date Shaving Parlor 

South Market St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



CENTRAL MEAT MARKET 



All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



ELIZABETHTOWN 



Poorman's Bakery 

Choice Bread, Roils & Cakes 

HUMMELSTOWN ST. 




S. B. KIEFER 

Notary Public 

Insurance, Keal Estate and Collections 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA> 

HARDWARE \ 

< Automobiles 

^ Ptionoyraphs and 

e Records 

< F. P. GAS PLANTS 

S ELIZABETHTOWN. • PENNA. 



Q p [|yn| r Dry Coods, Notions, Foot- 



S. Market & Bainbridge Sts. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PA. 



Wear, Carpets, Linoleums 
and Oil Cloths 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



»♦♦ ^ ^^^♦♦♦^ l ^ » ^^^^ H ^♦^^^ ^» ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ♦♦^ l ^♦♦ ^ ^^ i ^^^^^^ 

' Fashionable 

COLUMBIAN 

: Plymouth Rocks 

; THE UTILITY BEAUTY BREED. 
BREITIGAN'S REGAL STRAIN 

True Plymouth Rock and Light 
Brahma crosses leduced to the 
modern fishionable "Rock" type 
and size, resul'ing in constitutional 
strength and vigor and wonderful 
laying qualities. 

I'.ggs and Stock for season. 
Write for illustrated circulnr and 
Mating list, 

James H. Breitigan 

Box CT. LITITZ, PENNA. 



D. C. BRINSER 



Coal 



Grain, Flour, Feed, 
Seeds, Hay, Straw 
and Fertilizer. 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

Rheems, - - Pa. 



VVenn Sie zu Stadt kommen auf dem 
Blitzwagen oder auf dem Eiseobahn, bit- 
ten vvir Sie fur ein Stieck zer Erfriescb- 
UDg. Das Nissley Zimraer hat schnelle 
Zubereitungen. 

14-16 Kbsten Strasze, 
LAxNCASTER, PA. 



WE ARE AFTER YOU 

c^^R. cTVIAN 

We want you for a customer, so we 
tempt you with a store full of uncommon 
values. Come and see them. Sooner 
or later you are going to tind out the 
advantage of quality, service and price, 
to be obtained here. The sooner you 
do it the better it will be for you. 



i^ 





m 



Our customers are all pleased custom- 
ers, because we really stand back of 
everything we sell. 



MARTIN 

Clothier and Furnisher 

ElilZABETHIOWN, - PENNA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



iTHE ^ BOOK ^ STORE I 



Books, Stationery, School 

Supplies and Post 

Cards 



Sunday School Supplies 

and Mottoes 

Mail Orders Solicited 



C. N. FALKENSTEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. 







IPaintinG anb IPaper 
Ibanging 

AMOS B. DRACE 
J. M. BENNER 

FREIGHT, BAGGAGE and EXPRESS 
Furniture, Pianos, Machinery 

PLATE GLASS A SPECIALTY. 


S.. G. GRAYBILL 
College Hill Dairy 

Fresh milk and cream daily. All milk 
tested forcbildren; free from tuberculosis 

I HOTELS AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED 










cyl. W. MARTIN 

COAL, \YOOD. GRAIN 
FLOUR and FEED 

Telephone 

ElilZABETHTOWN. - PENNA. 


TAKE YOURo 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesdav and Thursday moruiDK, 
Returns Wednesday and Friday afternoon. 


J. RALPH GROSS 


[[ THE BARBER j| 


ELIZABETHTOWX, - PENNA. 







5 ^ 



5 O. N. HEISEY g 

■^ Provisions, Groceries, CBi> Choice Candies ^ 

•^ HEISEY BtJUiDING KLIZABETHTOWN, - PBNNA. ^. 




n-etn^ 




CONTRIBUTION OF ROME TO CIVILIZATION 8-10 

AN EXERCISK IN LETTER WRITING 11 

EDITORIAL- 12-15 

A GREAT LEADER 12 

SCHOOL NOTES 16-21 

SENIOR ARBOR DAY ^^ 17 

CHAPEL TALK 20 

ALUMNI. 21-22 

RELIGIOUS APPOINTMENTS 22 

EXCHANGES 23-24 

WHY I BECAME A TEETOTALER 25 

GOLDEN WORDS OF TWO PRESIDENTS 25 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



EVERYBODY'S STORE 



EMZABETHTOWN 
PENNA. 



Your needs supplied at 
satisfactory prices in Dry 
Goods, Groceries, Ready- 
to-Wear Clothing for Men 
and Women of all ages. 
Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oil- 
Cloth, Shoes, Etc. 

Polite attention. 
Siiuare dealing. 
Guaranteed satisfaction. 




Agents for .Made-to- 
measure 

CLOTHING 

International Tailoring (Jo. 
New York 

Star Tailoring Co. 

Chicago. 

American Ladies Tailoring Co. 

Chicago 

XJp-tn.Date Samples 

On Hand 



HERTZLER BROTHERS AND COMPANY 



W. S. SMITH, President. 



PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 



AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier. 



U. S. DEPOSITORY 



Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits Over $145,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid oi> 
special deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 



DIRECTORS 



W. S. Smith 

F. W. Grofl 

E. C. GInder 



Elmer W. Strlckler 

J. S. Rlsser 
Amos G. Coble 



Peter N. Rutt 
B. L. Oeyer 
E. E. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



The House of Good Clothes" ? 

le promises ii 
:s on your bac 



Don t judge a Clothier by what he promises in print. Judge him by what 
he puts on your back. 



t 



t 



'•^.^t-:; 



uSt. 






i 



We invite tbe severest probe iuto the value of our Ready to Wear or Tailored 
Measure Clothing. 

"THE STORE ACCOMMODATING" 

S. M. MYERS 6l CO., 

CLOTHIERS. HATTERS AND FURNISHERS 



i 



I 



«<l|<^Oi w <i^KWi—iw<^i^t» . .^iWiO aWKW*i«^IA»'«» - *4A>i** ■•^A^"* ■*<lA>t* ■M^|A»*f«P 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



SHOES 




More and mare 
Elizabe t h t o w n 
{eet are getting 4. 
the habit of keep- T 
ing comp'ny 'with 4» 
onr Shoe Depart- 4* 
ment. There's a || 
reason of course. J* 
Prices very, very 4* 
easy on the purse T 
and easy on the * 
feet. Shoes for 4* 
for the who.le ,|, 
family. * 



t Huntzbcrgcr-Wintcrs Co. 

* Department Store 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



iiiiiBiiiiiiiaiiiiiHiiiaiiiiiBiiiiiBiiiiiaiiiiiaiiiiiBiiiBiiiiiiiiii 



This space is reserved for 
The ELIZABETHTOWN 
& MARIETTA ELEC- 
TRIC LIGHT CO. 



llllBlliailllBlllliaillllBn';! .■<„'.,■;' iMKBII 



i:illBi;!IHiilliB!ill»!niB:llllB:illB::iiK;inH:»in'::;iBII!!B:!!IIB11 
COLUMBIAN and RED CROSS 

Heaters and Ranges. 

THE FINEST LINES MADE 




Jos. H. Rider & Son 



li:iilB!l!!!Blli:iBIIRi 



$ WE EARNESTLY SOLICIT 
I LIBERAL PATRONAGE 
i FOR 

LUMBER 

AND MILL-WORK 

Cement, Slate, 

Snckctt Plaster Board, 

Patent Plaster, 

Rubcroid Roofing, 

White Coat, 

Mapcs & Miller's Fertilizer, 

Ruberine Paint, 

and all kinds of 
Building Material. 



I 
t 
t 




Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



MI!lliaii|IHI1lia!'iia'!l'llll!!'B''na!'''!BI'i:ii:!lrB'''"B!'l!ailWailllllll| 
i GET THIS BIG i 

I POULTRY REFERENCE BOOK i 
I 




We Are Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
Made To Order 

Plain 
Clothing 

In This Country 



= GREID£RS FINE CATALOG ^ 

s l'.i:2 has 224 pp containing 57 pictures of show fowls g 

H in natural colors Largest and most practical poultry m 

p book published for experienced raisers. Its text ;s so ^ 

B clear and concise that beginners can ejs.ly understand g 

J B. H.GREIDER, Ecx CRHEEKS.PA.g 

:iBiii«i«iiiin!ii:iB:ii'HiiiiHiii'iK;iiiS!fBii[iiBiiiHi!Vii!;!H!ia~ 



•5*#*4«4*4*«4«44*4-**l».*44*4*«**« 



You Can Improve Your 



By Subscribing for 
THE BUSINESS EDUCATOR 

By Practicing from 



or By Attending 
THE ZANERIAN COLLEGE 



When in Lancaster it will [)ay 
you to visit ours, the only 
Clothing S^tore in that city that 
has One Price to All and gives 
discounts to none. See us for 



Men's Ready Made and 
Made to Order 

Clothing 

AND 

Furnishings 



YouVh's and Boys* 
Clothing 



* For Circulars, Prices, Etc. ♦ 

i Apply to J 

I ZANER & BLOSER CO. t 

4( Penmanship Specialists ^ 

I Columbus, - - Ohio * 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Since JS.')4 at 
Centre Square, Next to City Hall 

Lancaster, Pa. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



♦♦♦♦♦ »» * < - »* »M-- t - l - * -l- ****»» - l"l"t4"l -»*- l -*«*** **»* ***** *» **** ** ' l '*t> l > , 



Greater Speed— Greater Accuracy- 
Greater Etticiency— are tlie 
logical results ot installing the:; 

UNDERWOOD 

Typewriter 




1^ 



EXCLUSIVK Underwood features make possible the most important i.ihor- 
saiinj.'- systems of modern accounting. 

I'he ever yrowing- demand puts the amuiai sales of the Underwoods far 
ahe^id of those of any olher machine — making necessary the largest typewriter 
tactory and the largest typewriter office building in the world. 

Such a demand from busines-. men everywhere is unqueslionaLle evi- 
dence of the practical mechanical superiority of 

"The Machine You Will Eventually Buy." 

Underwood Typewriter Co.'- 

UNDERWOOD BUILDING NEW YORK 



(§ttY OInUpgf ©trnpa 



Elizabkthtown, Pa,, May, 1912 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Elizabeth Myer Kditor-in-Chief 

W. K. Gish, '14 School Notes 

Mamie Keller, '12 Society News 

Levi Ziegler, '13 Society News 

VV. F. Ksbelman, '12 Exchanges 

Leah M. Sheatfer, '09 Alumni Editor 

Ralph VV. Sehlosser, '11 Business Manager 

Daisy P. Rider, '10 Art Editor 



Published monthly during the school year. 

This paper will be sent continuously to old subscribers, so as not to break their tiles, and ar- 
rearages charged, unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration. 
Address all business communications to the Business Manager. 
Terms : 50 cents per year ; single copies, 10 cents. 



IMPORTANT! STUDENTS I 
DO YOU KNOW THAT 

TT is only because of the kind patronage of our business and our profes- « 
-*■ sional men in this town and elsewhere, that this magazine exists. They 

have indeed shown themselves friends of Our College and of " Our Col- < 

lege Times." j I 

Therefore, we justly and fairly may ask you, when about to buy any- 
thing, to consider first those who by their advertising have made this maga- , 
zine possible- ' 

We have solicited only advertisers who are reliable in all respects- i 

READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS i 



BUSINESS MANAGER OF "OtTR CiOIXEGE TIMES' 

n fcat^UWiMi'^l/W'WiMi*^/^** ■■»i ^ ||W> ■■»^A>'* m i^^f i K^ IIW** »i« « W «' « «4lWy^ 



Contributions of Rome to Civilization 



By Joshua Reber, '14 



AT the beginning of Roman his- 
tory (753? B. C.) man had al- 
ready attained an ordinary de- 
gree of civilization. The Egyptians 
gave us the beginnings of art and sci- 
ence. They had made great progress 
in geometry and astronomy, a thing 
which can probably be attributed 
to the Nile. This river overflowed 
its banks yearly and flooded vast 
areas of land. This led the Egypt- 
ians to discover some way by 
which they could tell their own prop- 
erty after the river receded to its 
natural bounds. The fact that this 
flood came anually, probably caused 
them to speculate for results from the 
position of the stars and planets. And 
so well did they succeed in computing 
time, that Julius Caesar adopted their 
calendar with but slight revision. 
They also excelled in medicine. 

From the Tigris-Euphrates states 
we have more especially that which 
tends toward material civilization and 
commercial law. In the early centur- 
ies they had already invented a sys- 
tem of writing, known as the Cunei- 
form system. Libraries were in ex- 
istence as early as 2700 B. C, and the 
public was urged by the kings to pat- 
ronize them. They understood the 
use of the lever and the pulley, and 
could construct arches and aqueducts. 
Possibly the only contribution Rome 
made to masonry was the dome. We 
may believe that their edifices were 
equal in beauty to any Roman temple, 
for when the Greeks, skilled archi- 



tects themselves, invaded Babylonia 
and found the "Hanging Gardens," 
they considered them among the sev- 
en wonders of the world. 

The Hebrew contributed the pure 
and lofty religious conceptions which 
afterwards swayed the world. The 
Greek, although almost contempor- 
aneous with the Roman in history, has 
influenced the Roman more than any 
other people. He was a transmitter 
of culture from the East to the West 
and from the West to the East. His 
keen intellect improved on everything 
with which it came in contact, and 
created many new ideas, especially 
along the line of philosophy. 

Thus we see that different peoples 
developed different ideas peculiar to 
their own locality. It is true that these 
nations warred against one another, 
thus causing the culture of one 
gradually to spread to another. But 
it remained for Rome to subdue them 
all, and govern them as one empire in 
a way never heard of before. The 
Mediterranean was open to none ex- 
clusively, and thus commercial inter- 
course was hampered. After Rome 
had become a world empire the Medi- 
terranean was open, trade was en- 
couraged by the nobility of Rome, and 
people from the different provinces 
mingled freely. Thus we see that it 
was the mission of Rome to dissemin- 
ate the culture brought from the se\'- 
eral localities after it had been devel- 
oped to its utmost, until conditions 
changed again. So Rome really has 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



given to modern civilization all that 
has been preserved from the earlier 
peoples. 

The direct contributions which she 
has made seem to be more or less ac- 
cidental, rather than produced by in- 
ventive genius. For the most part, an 
occasion presented itself which de- 
manded a change or addition to their 
laws, customs, and manners. This is 
also true to a great extent in their 
literature. 

It was at the time when Rome was 
at her zenith that Christianity began 
to stir. Probably there could not have 
been a better time than this, for the 
nations of that time differed in religi- 
ous ideas. Rome tolerated all religi- 
ons, however all were to reverence the 
state religion. The peaceful and com- 
mercial relations between the provin- 
ces made it easy for the Christian 
missionaries to go from province 
to province. Christianity grew and 
spread so very rapidly that it was im- 
possible to crush it, although bitter 
persecutions followed. 

These same conditions of peace and 
commercial relations which aided in 
the spread of Christianity, also helped 
to spread the Latin language and 
made it a common medium of learning 
and intercourse for centuries. At least 
it must have been very popular in 
Britain, the birthplace of the English 
language. Thousands of inscriptions 
have been discovered in the Latin 
language on that island, but not one 
in the Celtic language, which was 
used before the invasion of Caesar. It 
has perpetuated itself in the English 
language, as well as in the Ro- 
mance languages, through later writ- 
ers known in English literature as 



classicists. Even if the Latin would 
not have found its way into our lan- 
guage we would still appreciate it for 
the excellent style, the history which 
it contains, and the insight which it 
gives us into the Roman customs and 
religion and the barbarous tribes 
North of Rome. 

The expansion of Rome caused it 
to devise laws suitable for each pro- 
vince. Law is no doubt the greatest 
contribution Rome has given to civili- 
zation. How much of it is purely Ro- 
man and how much is Greek, is hard 
tO' say. The part of Roman law which 
most influenced European legal devel- 
opment is that part which deals with 
the ordinary relations of private per- 
sons ; for at the time when the law 
was codified, Rome was the only civ- 
ilized nation on earth, and thus there 
was no necessity for international 
laws. The struggles between the ple- 
beians and the patricians in the early 
history of Rome developed the demo- 
cratic spirit, which has since become 
so dear to the American, and is now 
breaking its way into China. The ef- 
fect of the successive grants of power 
to the plebeians and slaves must have 
fotmd its way into the Justinian Code. 

The barbarians invading Italy ac- 
cepted the Roman law with some var- 
iations to make it suitable for their 
own people. At the beginning of the 
twelfth century the laws of the bar- 
barians became very ineffective, and 
the expansion of commerce made it 
necessary for new laws to be made. 
Schools of law were then established. 
These schools used the Justinian 
Code as their model for law. The Uni- 
versity of Bologna alone had ten 
thousand students at the close of the 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



twelfth century, mostly foreigners. 
The natural result was that the laws 
enacted later savoured somewhat of 
this code of Roman laws. And today 
this influence not only prevails upon 
the continent of Europe and its depen- 
dencies ; but also throughout the 
western hemisphere and to some ex- 
tent in Japan and Turkey. 

Another almost direct contribution 
of Rome to modern civilization and an 
outgrowth of her laws, is the estab- 
lishment of municipal institutions. 
The following is a condensed passage 
from Freeman's Irrfpressions of Rome : 

"Her walls were no longer on the 
Tiber, but on the Danube, the Rhine 
and the German ocean. Instead of an 
outpost at Janiculum, her fortresses 
were at York and Trier. Many of the 
emperors after the first century were 
more at home in these and other dis- 
tant cities than in the ancient capital, 
which they visited perhaps only two 
or three times in a reign for some sol- 
emn pageant. In these once provin- 
cial towns the pulse of Roman life 
beat more strongly than Old Rome it- 
self." 

These provincial towns were at first 
governed by two consuls appointed by 
the consuls at Rome. Their duties 



over their provinces were very similar 
to that of the consuls of Imperial 
Rome. This form of government 
gradually decayed with the fall of the 
empire. However, the people began 
to choose their own consuls, and cre- 
ated some kind of an Assembly which 
was to aid the consuls in ruling the 
provincial towns. It rose again to re- 
newed life in union with feudalism. 
Indeed, some cities of Italy, France 
and Germany have derived their pres- 
ent magistracy by direct succession 
from the days of Imperial Rome, as is 
notably the case with Cologne. Later 
these municipalities received charters 
which made them subject to the Im- 
perial government, but allowed them 
to make laws to suit their own indi- 
vidual conditions. Our government 
of municipalities can be traced direct- 
ly to Rome. 

Resides having preserved the cul- 
ture from the old world, opened the 
way for Christianity, introduced an 
almost universal language, and con- 
tributed much to law, Rome has also 
given to us the idea and machinery of 
centralized administration, and the 
conception of one lasting universal su- 
preme authority to which the civilized 
world owes legitimate obedience. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



An Exercise in Letter Writing 



By Nora Reber 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Apr. 16, 1912. 

My Dear Grace, — 

Your letter gave me much pleasure 
when I read it yesterday. I enjoyed 
every word of it. 

You say it is lonely at boarding 
school this year. I can just imagine 
how you feel, for last year nearly all 
my old companions did not return. 
This year quite a number have re- 
turned, and our "sextette" is planning 
for good times. Our happy bunch of 
six has again met for a year of solid 
work and plenty of fun. But best of 
all is that we have our old rooms in 
the left wing. You know, Grace, these 
rooms ofTer advantages such as no 
other rooms in the building offer. 
Chum and I had our's papered and got 
a handsome little dresser. Do you 
remember Sara Pratt? She is still in 
the habit of getting up to see the sun- 
rise. The other day she wrote a beau- 
tiful description of one for English. 
The Rhetoric teacher was very proud 



of it. Susan Anthony still gets her 
laughing spells. I presume you will 
never forget that night when you were 
with us. It seems she is growing more 
comical every day. This week is our 
turn for the tea-party. Chum just re- 
turned from home and brought many 
delicious things to eat. Wish you 
might be here then. 

As you know, this is my Sopho- 
more year. It is useless for me to tell 
you what studies I have for you have 
already gone thru the "old mill." 
Greek is real difficult for me. Prof. 
Blank gives me the blues of it at 
times. In translating her Virgil chum 
frequently says; "Behold, Virgil, thou 
art dead these many years ! Would 
that thy works were dead also." I 
can't help but be amused at her. 

There rings the ten o'clock bell! I 
won't be able to write more now, but 
will continue the news in my next 
week's letter. Good night. Chum 
sends her love. 

Your Sincere Friend, 
Nora. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




HE same sweet sounds are in 

my ear 

My early childhood loved to 
hear. 
The violet there, in soft May 

dew, 
Comes up, as modest and as 
true. 
— William Cullen Bryant. 



The beautiful month of May is upon 
us. How much brightness she has 
brought with her! She is warmheart- 
ed and sympathetic. She is constant 
and true, for every year she comes 
back at just the same time to walk the 
old paths through the woodlands and 
across the meadows, and to gladden 
our hearts and make us forget our 
cares. Let us be as constant, as true- 
hearted, purehearted. warmhearted as 
the May. 

Since the Spring Term is upon us, 
all are al^out as busy as busy can be. 
The Seniors have just rendered their 
Arbor Day program, and are now busy 
with their studies required in their 
different courses, and in working out 
orations for Commencement week. 

The executive committee of the Al- 
umni Association are investigating 
the whereabouts of the minutes of the 



business meeting held last year on the 
night of the Alunjni supper. They are 
arranging the program for the public 
Alumni meeting and for the Alumni 
supper which are held during Com- 
mencement week. 

A Great Leader 

According to the statements made 
by Dr. F. J. Stanley, of Xewburg on 
the Hudson, in his lecture on the '"Rev- 
lution in China." Sun Yat Sen is the 
greatest man in the history of the pres- 
ent day. About seventeen years ago. 
while yet a young man. Sun Yat Sen, 
together with fifteen other liberal- 
minded Chinamen secretly planned to 
overthrow the Manchu government, 
and these plans were discovered by 
the ]\Ianchus. All the young China- 
men were beheaded except Sun Yat 
Sen, who escaped and fled to America. 
In his early life he was educated in 
medicine, and this black eyed China 
doctor had his headquarters in San 
■Francisco for about eight years. Dur- 
ing all this time he was at the head of 
a committee of thirteen and a half mil- 
lion educated Chinamen, who carefully 
and deliberately planned a reform in 
the Chinese government. When the 
plans of this committee were complet- 
ed, this little black-eyed physician in 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



San Francisco sent a cablegram to one 
of the principal cities in China, say- 
ing, "The hour has come. Strike now!" 
Then he left for China and in four 
months and two days the most remarkj 
able bloodless revolution in history 
closed. China was declared a republic 
and Sun Yat Sen was made the presi- 
dent. 

In the phraseology of Dr. Stanley, 
the character of Sun Yat Sen embodies 
the great characteristics of both our 
great Americans, Washington and Lin 
coin. 

Comparing the history of the Ameri- 
can republic with that of China, we 
notice that it required eight years of 
war and six years for the forming of 
the constitution before our govern- 
ment was set on a firm basis, while 
the revolution in China was accom- 
plished in the remarkably short time 
of four months and two days. 

These events verify the truth of the 
statement that God is in history over- 
ruling the destiny of nations. Dr. 
Stanley spoke in the most exalting 
manner of the christian character of 
Sun Yat Sen,— how marvellously God 
protected him and used him in bring- 
ing about the freedom of China. The 
ten remarkable principles upon which 
the constitution of China is based are 
published on another page in this issue 
of our College Times. They are a 
striking object lesson, from which all 
Christian nations can be benefitted. 

Theodore Roosevelt 

Only a few years ago Theodore 
Roosevelt was considered the greatest 
man in America. Today he is ridiculed, 
criticized, and condemned by many of 



our people. Can it be possible that a 
man with the reputation that Roose- 
velt had a few years ago could in so 
short a time degenerate to conditions 
set forth by those who oppose him in 
politics? 

\\'e are not making a plea for his 
election to the presidency of the United 
States, but rather for a fair considera- 
tion of the principles for which he 
stands. 

Wreck of the Titanic 
The hearts of the people of all 
Christian nations are throbbing- with 
sympathy for the many who have gone 
down into watery graves through the 
wreck of the great ocean steam liner 
known as the Titanic. In the words of 
one of our daily periodicals, "Great 
and prominent men in the higher ac- 
tivities of life, in society, and in the 
world of letters and of art — all found 
a common grave." According to the 
brave tradition of law of the sea, the 
women and children were saved but 
only to weep over those who perished. 
Let us give the tear of pity to the 
dead and our deepest sympathy to the 
survivors. 

The Public Ledger of Philadelphia 
for April 18 expresses itself on the re- 
sponsibility for this wreck thus : — 

"The Titanic was the most beautiful 
ship that human invention, ingenuity, 
abetted by all the resources of applied 
science, could devise and construct. 
Nothing the public could ask for in 
her equipment was omitted — things 
the public did not ask for — the life 
boats and similar means of rescue — 
were left out. Since the company that 
set the ship afloat gave the public just 
what it wanted, and withheld from the 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



public what it did not want, who is 
principally to blame? It is not finding 
a specious plea in extenuation of neg- 
ligence, but is the merest fair-minded- 
ness to point out that the public gets 
what it pays for and insists upon, and 
if it wants things differently ordered it 
must say so in no uncertain voice, and 
bringing to bear the compelling force 
of public opinion. 

In the censure heaped upon the com- 
pany that sent forth the Titanic with 
an insufficiency of lifeboats we are 
not to forget that the pubHc is most of 
all to blame. The boat was built and 
equipped in complance with popular 
demand. It was as luxurious and com- 
fortable at the expense of safety as the 
public required it should be; it carried 
as many boats and salvatory applianc- 
es as the public, through the law, in- 
sisted that it should. It took its course 
amid the perilous fringe of the ice-pack 
at a dangerous rate of speed because 
public opinion in two continents, want- 
ed a record made and applauded the 
risk. 

If there had been life boats enough 
on the decks, promenaders might have 
complained that their view of the sea 
was interruptede and the necessary 
space for exercise encumbered. The 
reluctance of the builders to overload 
the superstructure with smaller navig- 
able craft, for an emergency viewed as 
extremely remote, can be understood ; 
but their reluctance would have been 
dc^r'-.-cd rf ary c"curc if the public 
would, undergo the ornamental for the 
vitally practical, and make room for 
the lifeboats by doing without palm 
gardens and cafes and squash courts. 
If the public must carry to sea with it 
ever}' means of pleasing jaded senses 



that :t has enjoyed ashore, then it must 
dispense with the elemental safe 
guards. It cannot have its swimming 
tanks and wine cellars, its private 
promenades and boudoirs, and at the 
same time make ample provision for 
what may happen when the sea's 
might or the ice mountain's petrified 
majesty overtops the puny strength, 
and feeble wit, the fragile handiwork of 
man. And if the choice lies between 
luxurious peril and merely comfortable 
safety, there is no doubt as to what 
the choice should be. 

Education 
"Education," says some one, "is the 
process by which the mind is develop- 
ed and knowledge is acquired." 

But taken in a broader sense, edu- 
cation means the harmonious develop- 
ment of all the powers of man — body, 
mind, spirit — head, heart, hand. 

This trinity of forces in man, the 
most significant on earth, want to be 
guided and unfolded a? God intended 
they should be. 

The formation of habit is education. 
All education is habit forming. True 
education is the forming of right hab- 
its in ever}- direction. 

Prof. Wm. James, the most promi- 
nent educator in the United States 
says: — "Education is the organization 
of acquired habits of conduct, and 
tendencies to behavior." 

Dr. D. C. Reber, teacher of Pedago- 
gy' in Elizabcthtown College, .<;ays 
that education is a process which en- 
ables the individual to acquire power 
to do his utmost through knowledge 
and to be his utmost through charac- 
ter. In this definition you notice that 
education is not only the acquiring of 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



knowledge but the development of 
character. 

Some think that when a man (or 
woman) has all the book learning he 
or she can get he is educated. Not so. 
Do you think a public school teacher 
is educated if he can teach school and 
do nothing else? 

Should he not know how to build a 
fire, drive a nail, bind a wound, and 
be an example to the community in 
good morals and gentle manners, 
kind, gentle, sympathetic, pleasant, 
sociable? and an example of a noble, 
sterling Christian. 

Do you think that a minister is 
educated if he knows the Bible, and 
preaches excellent sermons, but does 
not know how to do little acts of 
kindness in his home, to train the 
how to act the part of 
in being sociable, kind, 
sympathetic to his flock, 
is expected to lead on to- 
ward heaven and to feed them the 
bread of life, to think, to work, to feel 
— sj'mpathize. 

Do you think a young lady is edu- 
cated when she has gone through Col- 
lege, and she doesn't know how to 
sweep a room, or bake a pie, or mend 
a stocking, sew on a button or to offer 
a prayer, and to love and appreciate 
parents. 

One should have acquired these 
habits in her girlhood and then with 
her college education, which should 
make her a strong Christian charac- 
ter, she can go out into life and make 
her influence felt in the world. We 
repeat then that education is the har- 
monious development of character. 

The Senior's commencement ora- 



child. or 
a pastor 
generous, 
which he 



ions were due to their advisors on 
April 26. 

Mr. Wachstetter of Elizabethtown, 
is erecting a dwelling house on Col- 
lege Avenue, on the western bungalow 
style. 

Prof. J. S. Illick in his talk on trees 
at the College, among other startling 
remarks, said, "United States is the 
most progressive nation on the globe, 
but it is also the most wasteful." 

"Our forests should be conserved so 
as to result in the greatest good to the 
greatest number of people, for the 
longest period of time." 

We wish to express our sincerest 
thanks to Mrs. Anna Groff, widow of 
the late B. G. Groff, of Elizabethtown, 
who so kindly donated a mirror to the 
College Sewing Room. 

"Each acre of forest land ought to 
produce one cord of wood a year. The 
forests of America are producing at 
present twelve cubic feet per year, 
only one-tenth as much as they should 
produce. We are using lumber four 
times as fast as we produce it." 

Dr. Reber, on his return from Dis- 
trict Conference, gave a short but in- 
teresting report of the meeting, the 
gist of which we give below: — Moder- 
ator, John Herr, Myerstown ; Reading 
Clerk, G. N. Falkenstein, Elizabeth- 
town; Writing Clerk, H. K. Ober, 
Elizabethtown College ; Representa- 
tives on Standing Committee, L W. 
Taylor, Frank Cassel; District Sun- 
day School Secretary, Nathan Martin, 
who was a student here in the Bible 
Course for several years. The next 
District Meeting will be held at Eph- 
rata. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




CHOOLJHOTE 



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A ^ £. A^ &L 



'^j^jT^^^^^^*^^^^ %fi'f^ 



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You mast Sup 



pi> 



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54 



THOUGH the spring vacation, 
from noon, March 21, to noon, 
March 25, was very short, yet 
it proved highly beneficial to those of 
us who needed a few days rest. 

April 1st found our busy janitor 
and steward, Samuel Dennis, setting 
onions in the College garden. 

Since Mary Scheafifer has taken up 
her abode at Dr. Reber's, Bertha Hol- 
linger is her successor as waiter in the 
College dining room. Since writing 
the above, Freda Holsinger of Blair 
Co., has succeeded Bertha Hollinger 
as waiter. 

Helen Kline, of Lancaster, besides 
pursuing studies at the College is an 
assistant in the culinary department. 

Prof. Ober is chosen as an alternate 
delegate to Annual Meeting and a reg- 
ular delegate to District Meeting. 
His being a member of the General 
Sunday School Board of the Church of 
the Brethren adds to his many duties 
the part of helping to arrange a Sun- 
day School program to be executed 
durine the Annual Conference to be 
held at \nvk in June. 

Rufus Buchcr, of Mechanic Grove, 
has recently undergone an operation 
for appendicitis at the General Hospit- 
al in Lancaster. The latest reports 
tells us that he is doing nicely. 



Aliss Gertrude Keller, who has 
finished the Advanced Commercial 
Course, is now employed as clerk in 
the office of Muth Brothers, in Eliza- 
bethtown. 

At 8:15 the class in Agriculture may 
some days be seen walking through 
the College orchard eagerly catching 
the questions and suggestions that 
fall from the lips of the teacher, Prof. 
Ober. The members of the class at 
present are Rebekah Sheafifer. Mamie 
Ke'ier, Nora Reber, Howard Merkey, 
John Kuhns, Raymond Geib. 

'I he clicking of the lawnmower was 
fiv^l heard on the College campus on 
W'cdnesday afternoon, April 10, with 
\\'. K. Kulp as motorman. 

Since Easter Prof. Meyer is happy 
in having his wife and little Mildred 
back to live with him in their apart- 
ment at the college. Mrs. Meyer is 
especially attentive to the wants of 
their child, and she and Professor have 
succeeded remarkably well in keeping 
baby quiet, for there are times when 
we hardly know that there is a baby 
among us. They no doubt believe in 
instilling early into the child's life the 
teaching of the catalogue statement 
which says. "Rudeness and boistreous 
conduct are foreign to the true lady 
and gentleman." 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



IT 



A letter written by Miss Markley 
from Decatur, Georgia, on March 31 
says : — "The peach and pear blossoms 
are at their zenith, violets and daffo- 
dils run riot in every yard no matter 
how meagre the grass; every tree is 
veiled in a misty sheen of green. The 
Memorial Day of the South falls on 
April 29." 

"If all goes as it is planned, the last 
of May will see me back in Ohio, as 
we have really only six weeks more of 
class work." 

Rumor has it that Brother Zug will 
move to Palmyra in the fall after 
which John Berberian will bring his 
mother and other members of his fam- 
ily into his new home. 

Those of our friends who were here 
when John Berberian, the Armenian, 
was a student here, will be interested 
to know that John has been a very 
successful cobbler in Elizabethtown 
since he left College. He has recent- 
ly bought the home owned by John C. 
Zug on East High street, and has 
erected a neat-looking shoemaker shop 
to the east of the main building. 

Miss Nora Reber thinks that canned 
quinces make the best desert she has 
had in the college dining-room for a 
long time. 

The Ladies' and Gentlemen's chor- 
uses are practicing muisc for com- 
mencement week. The Male Quartet 
practice in the Chapel in Memorial 
Hall. 

Christman (coming from German 
class to Latin class) : Er venit ut man- 
eat." 

Prof. Schlosser (in English class 
reading Silas Marner) : Mr. Rose, 



what is wrong with this quotation, 
"Wilt thou have this man to thy wedd- 
ed wife?" 

Mr. Ruse : "I never passed through 
the ordeal but I think it should read, 
"Wilt thou have this wife to thy wedd- 
ed husband?" 

Prof. Schlosser: "I believe that you 
never passed through the ordeal." 

Senior Arbor Day 

The Arbor Day Exercises rendered 
by the Seniors in Music Hall on Fri- 
day afternoon, April 12, were much en- 
joyed by those present. Soon after 
the ringing of the three o'clock bell, 
seventeen dignified Seniors marched 
from the reception-room to Music 
Hall and took their places on the 
rostrum. The upholstered chair pre- 
sented to the school by Mr. and Mrs. 
F. W. Groff was arranged to the right 
of the rostrum to accomodate the 
principal speaker of the afternoon. 
Prof. J. S. Illick, of Mont Alto School 
of Forestr}'. 

After the song, "Oh Nature, Sweet 
Nature" by the class, Mr. Walter Esh- 
leman. president of the class, delivered 
a stirring address on the subject of 
"Lessons from Tree-life." Bryant's 
Forest Hymn was then very well re- 
cited by Miss Ava Witmer. An essay 
on "Nature Study" was then read hy 
Miss Irene Sheetz. Mr. C. L. Martin, 
the soloist of the class, sang. "Come,. 
sit by my side." A paper on "Destruc- 
tion of American Forests" was read by 
Mr. Orville Becker. Prof. Illick was 
then introduced to the audience, and 
for about an hour thrilled us with en- 
thusiasm on the subject of "Conserva- 
tion of Trees." 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



After this the class marched to the 
campus where they planted an oak 
tree, near the cottage. 

Teachers Returned 

The following persons who have 
been teaching in public schools in 
different counties during the winter 
have returned to us for the purpose of 
continuing studies which shall better 
equip them for their work: Misses 
Mary Myers, Rebecca Sheaffer, Mary 
Hershey, Ada Brandt, Gertrude New- 
comer, and Messrs. I. J. Kreider, Ray- 
mond Geib, Howard Merkey, Franklin 
Teeter, Edgar Long, Walter Herr, B. 
Lehman Kraybill, John Eshleman, 
Clayton Frey, Harry Longenecker and 
James Smith. 

These, and others who have never 
taught, are anxiously looking forward 
to the time for Teachers' Examination 
in their respective counties. 

Senior Class 
The roll of the Senior Class of 1912 
is as follows : Pedagogical Course, 
Mamie B. Keller, Harry H. Nye ; Col- 
lege Preparatory, Walter Eshleman, 
William Christman ; English Scien- 
tific, Irene Sheetz, Orpha Harshber- 
ger. ''lertru ie Miller. Christian Mar- 
tin, Orville Becker; Bible. William. 
Kulp ; Complete Commercial. Ava 
Witmer, Gertrude Keller, Condry 
Long. Fred Burgess, Russel Shank, 
Paul Landis, Isaac Foreman. 

Literary Society Anniversary 

On Friday April 12, the Keystone 
and Homerian Literary Societies held 
their anniversary exercises in the Col- 
lege Chapel. The inclement weather 



prevented some from attending. With 
these we sympathize, for they missed 
a rare treat. 

The meeting was called to order by 
the President, Mr. James Breitegan, of 
Lititz. The first feature of the pro- 
gram was music by a male octette, the 
names being given in the Homerian 
Society Notes. 

The cream of the program was a 
lecture by Dr. F. J. Stanley of New- 
burg-on-the-Hudson. His theme was 
up-to-date. "The Revolution in China." 
Dr. Stanley spoke of the six hundred 
years of causes, leading up to the 
"bloodless revolution" or the "miracle 
of ages," as it has been termed. One of 
the causes was the tyranny of the 
Mongolian and Manchurian rulers, 
each in their respective periods. An- 
other was fifty years of education. 

This culminated in seventeen years 
of study and research, by the largest 
committee the world has ever known, 
a committee of thirteen and a half mil- 
lion Chinese, most of whom were well- 
educated, or rather, liberally educated. 
The headquarters of this band, the 
"Young Republic of China," was in 
San Francisco. From this point, on 
October 9, a telegram was sent to 
China, ordering the blow to be struck 
for freedom. Within four months, the 
little black-eyed physician. Sun Yat 
Sen, was declared provisional presi- 
dent of the new republic. Sun Yat Sen 
stands as one of the most remarkable 
diplomats in history. For seventeen 
years he lead this band of thirteen and 
a half millions, without jealousy and 
conspiracy. In him are merged the 
Washington and Lincoln of China. 
His way, however, was danger fraught 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



for the Manchus had placed a price on 
his head, but he was remarkably de- 
livered. 

The constitution of the new republic 
shows earnest study and deep thought. 
The tactful Chinese have wisely bene- 
fited by the follies of other nations. 
Ten fundamental principles are the 
backbone of their code of laws; viz., 

1. Freedom of speech. 

2. No taxation without represen- 
tation. 

3. Equal suffrage for all men with 
these restrictions : — 

(a) They must be able to write. 

(b) They must be 20 years of 
age. 

(c) They must be property 
holders. 

4. Equal suiTrage for women with 
same restrictions. 

5. Limitation of wealth. 

6. Government control of all neces- 
sities and commodities of life. 

7. Absolute Religious freedom. 

8. Open ports to all the world. 

9. Free trade with reciprocity. 
10. Compulsory education. 

With a constitution formulated on 
such sound common sense, and with 
such leaders at the helm as Sun Yat 
Sen and others, the Chinese Ship of 
State must clear the shoals, have 
smooth sailing, and finally become the 
admiration of the whole civilized 
world. 

Dr. Stanley closed with a fitting ap- 
plication of the cro.?sing of the Ameri- 
can stars and stripes, and the Chinese 
sun and stripes, as an emblem of 
friendship between the Occident and 
the Orient. 

The last feature of the program was 
music by the College Male Quartet, — 



Messrs. Gish, Kulp, Holsinger and 
Shank. 

Keystone Notes 
On the evening of March 29, the K. 
L. S. met in regular executive session. 
After the election of regular and term 
officers, a short program was rendered. 
The tellers reported the following 
elected: Pres., Harry F. Shank; Vice 
Pres., Hiram M. Eberly; Secretary, 
Carrie Dennis ; Editor, Irene Sheetz ; 
Critic, Leah Sheaflfer; Chorister, C. L. 
Martin. Term officers, Treas., Albert 
L. Reber; Reporter, Edna Brubaker; 
Recorder, Joshua D. Reber. 

Friday evening, April 5. after the 
inauguration of officers, the new presi- 
dent gave his inaugural address. 
The following program was then ren- 
dered: Recitation, Albert Reber; De- 
bate : Resolved ; That Municipal own- 
ership of public utilities is advantage- 
ous; debated affirmatively by Orpha 
Harshberger and Walter Eshleman ; 
negatively, by Rhoda Miller and C. L. 
Martin ; Music, "Sweet Hour of Pray- 
er." College Hill Quartet ; Select Read- 
ing, Gertrude Miller; Literary Echo, 
by the_ editor. 

Homerian News 

Because the program celebrating 
the anniversary of the two Literary 
Societies was held on Friday evening, 
the Homerians rendered their last 
public program on Saturday evening, 
April 13, 1912. The chaplain. Prof. 
Harley, offered a short sincere prayer 
which drew an atmosphere of sanctity 
over the audience. This was followed 
by a vocal solo, "Good-bye, Sweet 
Day," given by Miss Katharine Miller. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



This feature added tranquility to the 
screnit}- of the evening. Miss Lydia 
Stauffer then in an expressive manner 
read "The Boy with a Lunch." The 
Bible story involved in this reading 
made it very impressive. The next 
feature was an impersonation by Mr. 
Laban Leiter, who gave a portion of 
Macbeth, beginning with Macbeth's 
soliloquy in the First Act, and closing 
with the porter scene in Act 2. The 
impersonator was well acquainted 
with his selection and succeeded in 
bringing out the characteristics of the 
different characters. 

The song, "Willow-Tree," was then 
sung by a male octette consisting of 
Professors J. G. Meyer, R. W. Schlos 
ser. J. S. Harley, W. K. Gish and 
Messrs. Laban Leiter^ Jacob E. Myersj- 
H. K. Eby and B. F. Waltz. 

Miss Myer, the critic, from the view- 
point of her rich experience, singled 
out to the Homerians the points in 
the program in which they failed to 
make the ideal real. Mr. H. K. Eby. 
the Speaker, then delivered his ad- 
dress. 

Talk in Chapel 

On April 26, Prof. R. W. Schlosser 
gave a stirring Salmagundi talk to 
the students and teachers assembled 
in Chapel. With a number of humor- 
ous illustrations, he made clear to us 
the meaning of Salmagundi and we 
glean from his talk the following help- 
ful remarks : — 

"Learn to do your job right. If 
-\vhen blackening your shoes you for- 
,get to blacken your heels, you will be 
judged as one who does not complete 
his job." 



"You are not learning the principle 
of promptness, if when the second 
study bell rings, you run to the bath- 
room for drinks and walk downstairs 
for your books and run around the 
hall about fifteen minutes before set- 
tling down to work." 

"When students are granted out- 
ings, they should return five miuutes 
earlier than expected rather than five 
minutes too late. 

"Getting to Prayer Meeting, Mis- 
sionary Reading Circle, Christian 
Worker's Meeting, regular Church 
services, or any other place of duty on 
time is a habit that all young people 
should cultivate." 

"Young people should place them- 
selves in such relation with the man- 
agement, or a business firm, or any in- 
stitution, that all can put impHcit 
trust in them. Officers of Literary So- 
ciety, Baseball, Basketball, Tennis, 
and Alumni Associations should see 
that the Secretary's record of minutes, 
treasurer's reports, and all necessary 
accounts are in the hands of the prop- 
er persons before they leave school at 
the end of the year." 

"Students when placed on program 
on any of the above named organiza- 
tions should not look upon the honor 
with indifference, but try to prepare 
as best they can the work assigned 
them." 

"When we enroll at any institu- 
tion, we subscribe our names to the 
regulations of that institution, and 
hence are not loyal if we do not abide 
by them." 

"We should be economical in the 
(ise of light, heat, and water. We 
should never economize foul air with 
its microbes and poisonous gases by 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



keeping the windows and doors con- 
stantly closed. Fresh air doesn't cost 
anything, hence get all you can." 

"To write two "serial letters" to 
special friends each week requires too 
much of a student's time." 



"Students to be successful must 
have system in their work. They must 
map out a specific time for the study 
of each branch and for recreation, in 
which all should negege at the 
proper time." 




THE members of the Alumni 
Association will be interested 
to know that Misses Mary My- 
ers, '10, and Gertrude Newcomer, '08, 
and Harry Longenecker, '11, are back 
at school taking work at their Alma 
Mater. Including those who are 
teaching there are at present twenty- 
two of our Alumni at Elizabethtown 
College. 

I\Ir. James Breitigan served as 
chairman and Miss Agnes Ryan as 
secretary at the anniversary of the 
Literary Societies held April 12. 

An announcement reached us re- 
cently concerning the work of Mr. L. 
D. Rose. He has started a Spring 
Normal School in his home county, 
Somerset, of which he will be princi- 
pal. It will aim to prepare persons 
for the teacher's examination. 

Miss B. Mary Royer is expected to 
have charge of the Sunday School ex- 
hibits for a few days at the coming 
annual conference. 



A letter to the business manager 
states that Bruce Rothrock has recent- 
ly moved to California . His address 
now is Chico, Butte Co., California. 

One Alumnus, the proud parent of 
a little girl, has written to the editor 
expressing a desire that each baby in 
the Association have its picture in- 
serted in the College Times. That 
would be quite an idea but if carried 
out we fear it might take all the space 
of the paper as the cradle roll is fast 
increasing. So, Mr. Alumnus, please 
remember that it is fine theory but its 
practicability is questionable. 

This same Alumnus says that he, 
with his family, expects to be at Com- 
mencement. 

The executive committee are pre- 
paring a fine program. It will be 
published in the next issue of the 
Times. Don't miss it. 

The officers of the Association are 
as follows: Pres, J. G. Meyer; 1st. V. 
Pres., R. W. Schlosser; 2nd. V. Pres.„ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



2S 




«k^K-. - Lr^-^^1 ■• L ....... ji JiM:.J. M,>mul,fiM^ti,,„ „, Lr.xV* in M 



MERCURY is one of the strong- 
est papers from a literary point 
of view that has thus far come 
to our notice. Although the March 
issue is in the hands of a new Editori- 
al Staflf, it is up to the standard and 
we have great anticipations for the fu- 
ture of this periodical. We would es- 
pecially urge students to read "The 
Spirit of our Fathers" and "The 
Cheapness of Life." Several Locals 
and Jokes would add to the interest of 
the paper. 

The quarterly number of the Nor- 
mal Vidette again graces our table. 
This issue gives an instructive and in- 
teresting program on the centenary of 
Charles John Huffam Dickens' birth. 
By reading the different essays on 
England's greatest novelist one realiz- 
es how much the world owes to this 
portrayer of child life. 

College Rays contains an article 
that is worthy of every one's careful 
reading and reflection. "A Few Nega- 
tives that Menace Our Republic" 
states some of the important is- 



sues confronting the American nation 
which must be solved by the citizens 
now in college. 

We gratefully acknowledge the fol- 
lowing exchanges : Delaware College 
Review, Western Maryland College 
Monthly, Grove City Collegian, Tar- 
gum, Susquehanna, Linden Hall 
Echo, Albright Bulletin, College Stu- 
dent, College Rays, Philomathean 
Monthly, Normal Vidette, College 
(••Educator, Washington ' Collegian. 
Daleville Leader, Tempe Normal Stu- 
dent, Mercury, M. H. Aerolith, Ursin- 
us Weekly, Gettysburgian, Mount 
Morris College Bulletin, Purple and 
Gold, Carlisle Arrow, Perkiomenite. 

"So we see what the flag means to 
us is merely what we make it. Should 
we not then have our flag represent 
all that is pure and elevating and 
strive to get our land in harmony with 
it and keep it there? If each and ev- 
ery one of us would do this, how much 
cleaner and happier our land would 
become. It is not only through love 
of country that we would work to this 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



H. H. Nye; 3rd. V. Pres., E. R. Ruhl; 
Rec. Sec, Viola Withers; Cor. Sec, 
Mrs. Frank Groff; Treas., H. K. Eby; 
Executive Com., W. K. Gish, E. G. 
Diehm, Nora Reber. If you desire 
any information any of these will be 
ready to serve you. 



Misses Viola Withers and Daisy 
Rider spent their Easter vacation in 
E'town. 

We enjoyed visits from Andrew 
iHolIinger, Holmes Falkenstein, and 
L. B. Earhart at the beginning qf the 
Spring Term. 



Religious Appointments 

Regular Preaching Services: — 

March 31, 10.30 a. m., sermon — G. 
N. Falkenstein, Subject, "I am debt- 
or." Text, Rom. 1 :14. 

April 7, No services on account of 
Easter exercises in town. 

April 14, 10.30 a. m.. Sermon, — R. 
W. Schlosser, Subject, "The Lord's 
Prayer." Text, Matt 6:9:11. 
Prayer Meetings : — 

April 3, Leader, Miss Katherinc 
Miller. 

April 10, Leader, Mamie Keller. 
Missionary Reading Circle : — Satur- 
day, 6:45 P. M. 

President- — Virgil Holsinger. 

Teacher — Miss Staufifer. 

Reading — "Knight of the Labarum." 
Sunday Morning Classes: — 

"Prayer Life of Jesus," 7.35 a. m. 

Teacher — Miss Stauflfer. 
Sunday School Lesson : — 

Teachers — Miss Stauflfer and Prof. 
Harley. 



Up from the sweet South comes the 

lingering May, 
Sets the first wind-flower trembling 

on its stem; 
Scatters her violets with lavish 

hands. 
White, blue and amber. 

— Celia Thaxter. 



Dr. Reber expressed himself as be- 
ing glad to return to the activities on 
College Hill and reported that a num- 
ber of old students and graduates and 
patrons of the school showed interest 
by the inquiries they made. 

Rosy and white on the wanton 

breeze 
The petals fall from the apple-trees, 
And under the hedge where the 

shade lies wet 
Are children, picking the violet. 
— F. W. Bourdillon. 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



end but through obedience to God, the 
Creator and Ruler of the Universe." 

College Educator. 

"Football is an effort on the part of 
22 men to occupy the same place at 
the same time. It is classed as a game 
but looks more like a clinic. It is 
called football because the ball is 
about a foot long." — Collegian. 

"Men in public life are under the 
searching eyes of the people and this 
serves as a great stimulus to good 
conduct. But the private citizen nev- 
er feels this stimulus and is therefore 
liable to become careless about his 
conduct. This should not be so, for 
his conduct is an outward expression 
of the man within. It is not what we 
own, nor what we owe that marks us 
as honorable citizens, but the way in 
which we conduct ourselves." 

Philomathean. 

]Motto for class rooms — "Come in 
without knocking; go out the same 
way." — Ex. 

"One of the things that should 
cause lament is the fact that the great 
men of the present are ofttimes not 
recognized by their contemporaries. 
They may even possess marked ability 
and be one of the few who are doing 
much for the welfare of their fellow- 
men and yet not receive recognition. 
Is it not a sad fact that men of this 
quality are often ignored or even mis- 
treated by the very persons to whom 
they are bringing so much good. Hu- 



man nature seems to be such that de- 
mands so much of self that not much 
time remains for even observing the 
deeds of others." — Albright Bulletin. 

He that knows not and knows that 
he knows not, is a Fresh — Honor him. 

He that knows not and knows not 
that he knows not, is a Soph — Help> 
him. 

He that knows and knows not that 
he knows, is a Junior — Pity him. 

He that knows and knows that he 
knows, is a Senior — Watch him. Ex. 

"The world is looking for men of 
convictions who are going to be lead- 
ers and not be lead. These are edu- 
cated men. Almost every profession 
under the sun is calling for such men. 
Can we count on our colleges and uni- 
versities to supply them? Young 
man. what is your goal? Fix your 
eye upon some place indispensable ; 
some place that takes power and 
brains and principles and do not aim 
to be a mere machine man — a man 
tliat can be replaced by a mechanical 
device purchased with money." 

Susquehanna. 



The vales shall laugh in flowers, the 

woods 
Grow misty-green with leafing buds, 
.\nd violets and windflowers sway 
Against the throbbing heart of 
May. 

—John Greenleaf Whittier. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



Why I Became a Teetotaler- 
Gen. F. D. Grant 

" ' When I was a boy at school and at 
West Point, I was a pet because of the 
greatness of my father. I was given 
every opportunity to drink, and I did 
drink— some. As I got older and mixed 
with men, war-scarred veterans who fought 
■with my father would come up and, for 
the sake of old times, ask me to celebrate 
with them the glory of past events, and I 
did- — some. 

' ' Then when I was minister to Austria 
the customs of the country and my offi- 
cial po.sitiou almost compelled me to 
<irink always. I tried to drink with ex- 
treme moderation, because I knew that 
alcohol is the worst poison a man could 
take into his system; but I f-umd out it 
was an impossibility to drink moderately. 

"I could not say when drink was 
placed before me: ' No, I only drink in 
the morning,' or at certain hours. The 
fact that I indulged at all compelled me 
to drink on every occasion or be absurd. 

"For that reason, because moderate 
drinking is a practical impossibility, I 
hecame an absolute teetotaler — a crank, 
if you please . I will not e\-en allo\v it in 
my house. When a man can say, ' I 
never drink,' he never has to drink, is 
never urged to drink, never offends by 
not drinking; at least that is my expe- 
rience. — The Amethyst. 

Golden Words of Two Presidents. 

No man gets on so well in this world as 
he whose daily walk and conversation are 
clean and consistent, whose heart is pure, 
and whose life is honorable. A religious 
spirit helps every man. It is at once a 
comfort and an inspiration, and makes 



him stronger, wiser, and better in every 
relation of life- There is no substitute 
for it. It may be assailed by its enemies, 
as it has been, but they offer nothing in 
its place. It has stood the test of cen- 
turies and has never failed to help and 
bless mankind. 

The world has use for the young man 
who is well grounded in principle, who 
has reverence for truth and religion and 
Courageously follows their teachings. Em- 
ployment awaits his coming and honor 
crowns his path. More than all this; 
conscious of rectitude, he meets the cares 
of life with courage; the duties which 
confront him he discharges with manly 
honesty.— William McKinlev. 



We hold reunions, not for the dead, 
for there is nothing in all the earth that 
you and I can do for the dead. They are 
past our help and past our praise. We 
can add to them no glory; we can give to 
them no immortality. The,y do not need 
u;^, l)ut forever more we need them. 

— -James A. Garfield. 



Exactness. 

A great deal of the joy of life consists 
in doing perfectly, or at least to the best 
of one's ability, everything which lie at- 
tempts to do. There is a sense of satis- 
faction, a pride, in surveying such a work 
— a work which is rounded, full, exact, 
complete in all its parts— which the sup- 
erficial man, who leaves his work in a 
slovenly, slip-shod, half-finished condi- 
tion, can never know. It is this consci- 
entious completeness which turns work 
into art. The smallest thing, well done, 
becomes artistic. — Editor's Clippings. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Faculty 



D. C. REBER, A. M., Pd. D., President 
Philosophy, Pedagogy, German. 

H. K. OBER, Pd. B., Vice-President. 
Biological Science, Agriculture, 
Surveying. 

ELIZABETH MYER, M. E., 
Reading and Grammar. 

J. G. MEYER, Pd. B., A. B., Secretary, 
Mathematics, Physical Science, 
Greek. 

J. Z. HERR, Prin. Commercial Dept., 
Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Com- 
mercial Law. 

JACOB S. HARLEY, A. B., 

Algebra, German and Civics. 

LYDIA STAUFFER, 
English Bible. 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Pd. B., 
Piano, Orogan, Drawing. 



R. W. SCHLOSSER, Pd. B., A. B., 

English, Latin, French. 
KATIE E. MILLER, 

Director of Vocal Music, Voice 

Culture. 
ELIZABETH KLINE, 

Piano, Voice. 
ANNA W. WOLGEMUTH, 

Shorthand and Typewriting. 
W. K. GISH, Pd. B., 

U. S. History. 
C. E. RESSER, 

Geograph}-, History and Mathe- 
matics. 
LAURA B. HESS, 

Sewing. 

DAISY P. RIDER, Pd. B., 

(Absent on Leave.) 
ELD. S. H. HERTZLER, 

Exegesis (Bible Term.) 



50 N. QUEEN ST. 



afisible in the Jewelry busi 



LANCASTER, PA. 

Our new and la.ger store enabk-s u. I,, i;ivc. v-n ih- best servicer 
SILVERWARE oi the very best qu.li.v ..i pn. .- ..m.si reasonable. 
WATCHES. Our ranee in pric.- .s i, ,„ $150 i- $1.00. 
CLOCKS. From $300 chime ,1 . U i , 1 1- ,1,,, i„ ^ luck at 85 cents. 
EYE-GLASSES anci SFECTACLES l.iiel i, 'l,,. nyes with no charge for «xami.:alion. 
Our Manufacturing and Repairing Department cannot be excelled in Pennsylvania. Everything is 
done in our own shop, by -jur own workmen — You are always welccme at Zook's Jewelry Stere. 

D. Walter Miesse 

The Colleg:e and School Photog:rapher 

INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP 

PORTRAITS 



Bell Telephone -.'ml 

24 WEST KING STREET, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



27 



GEO. R. KERSEY A* If"" 



DENTIST 



ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

TOOTH BRUSHES, FLESH BRUSHES, 
SPONGES, Etc. 

A. W. CAIN 



WE DO IT RIGHT. 



Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES CBi SON 



A. R. LEICHT 

lianufactarer o£ FmO VehiclCS 

Ripainting and Re)air Work Given Carelul Attention 
ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



IIIIBnii;Bii:jaillllHllllBilinillllBIIIIBIIIIBlill:B!!l«''i 
College Jawelry cl the Better Sort 



iG.Wm.REISNER 



g Manufacturing | 

I Jeiveler | 

m Class Pins and Rings Prize Caps | 

I Fraternity Jewelry Medals I 

I LANCASTER, PA. | 

MfiiiniiiiaiiiiiBiiiiiBiiiiniiniaiiiiiBiiiiiBiiiHiiiiiBiiiiiaiiiiiniiiiaiiiiiriF 



F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 
GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 



HORSESHOEING 
North Varket Street. 



iP E Cl A L T Y 
ELIZABETH OWN, PA. 



J. GROFF & SONS 

Meat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



LEO KOB I 

Heating and | 

Plumbing | 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. | 

FRANK H. KELLER 

Dealer In Fancy and Staple Groceries 
Provisions, Etc. 

Our Highest Ambition to Please You. 



BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO SUPPLIES FOR SALE 
Centre Square 



Those who are judges of good Ice Cream say t 

I Miesse's Ice Cream I 

* is the most Delicious and Satisfying J 
^ they have eaten. Try it for yourself |I 

* We serve Parties, Weddings, Dinners 'f 
^ and Keceptions with calses and ice cream 4> 

* with perfect satisfaction. 4" 

D. W. MIESSE, 123 N. Queen St., Lancaster * 

ir Ice Cream sold in Eliiabethtown by J. C. Gross * 



UP TO DATE 

Shaving and Hair Cutting 

R. H. SHISSLER. 

Chas. B. Dierolt 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



********** #***4***********J 



***f First-Class Shoe Rjepairing 

I ^ £^^ hi Hj I j <^ Hj r\ * Work Guaranteed Prices Reasonable 

- RUBBER HEELS make WALKING EASY 



For Hooting, S[ioiitine;. Tin ami 
Granite Ware .Milk Cans, Radi- 
ators, I'ortatile Furnaces, Granite 
Lisk Koaslers in four Siizes, or 
any special orders in my line. 
Give me a trial. 



Jpp, E.rchaiige 1 

ELIZ.4BETHTOWN, 



JOHN C. BERBERIAM. E. High St. 



♦ H. H. BRAND7 I 



PENNA. * « 



4 * ♦ 

J»*************ft*****A#A****A** ♦ 



W. R. Ashenfelter f 

CHOICE BREAD AND |» 
CAKES » 

Weddings and Parties supplied with w 
Fancy Cakes at short notice. » 



t S. MARKET ST., ELIZABETHTOWN. PA ^ 

« « 



LL KINDS BUILDING M.\TERIAL 
SLATE and ROOFING P.APER 



♦ Elizabotlitovvii, - - Pen 

E. L. RENSEL 

General Blucksniithin^ 
and Repair Wmk 
Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

Park St., Elizabethtown, Pa 



Plain Suits. Ready-Made or Ordered, at *♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•) ♦♦« »♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

ADOLPH GANSMAN'S 

Clothier 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange St<., Lancaster. Ta ^ 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

Dental Parlors 



X ELIZABETH row X X 
X ROLLER MILLS | 

X J. p. BINKLEV, l»ropr. X 

\ ^ 



J. P. BINKLEV, l»ropr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades ol 

FLOUR AND FEED 

Highest Cash Prices paid for grain, 
bay and straw 



S. J. HEIxNDEL, Dentist. 



1912 



Tonring Car 



RnnabontSSOO 




♦ ELIZ.\BETHTOWN. - PEXN.A. S 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

5 AND fOc STORE 

Let us make your Nickels, I'imes and 
CJuarters do 'louhlediity. Nolhintt in the store 
is priced more than lOc and from that down. 

M. W. ESHENOAVER 
EUZ.IBETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

John A. Fisher 



Fnlly Equipped at Above Prices 
Call on or Address 
H. S. NEWCOMER, - Mt. Joy, Pa. centre Square. 



BARBER 



Elizabethto\ 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



Chas. R. Boggs, Restaurant 



First-Class c5^eals at All Hours 



Oysters In Season 



Confectionery", Ice Cream 



t S. G. HERSHEY 



Groceries, Dry 
Goods and 

Notions 



♦ ELIZABETHTOWX, - Pl!.A> 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦»»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦ 



For All Kinds of 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & McBride 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PKNNA. 



JACOB FISHER 

Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Center Square, Elizabethtown, Penna. 

With you for 31 years. That's All 

E, H. LEHMAN ^ 

COAL \ 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED, FLOUR. ^> 

SEWER PIPE, ETC. ( 

Telephone S 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 3 



Bell ami lad. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers In 

New and Old Books 

East Orange St., Lancaster, Pa 



DR. JEROME G. HESS 
DENTIST 



Hertzler 
Elizabethtow 




CHOICE MEATS 

A. K. Young 

EMZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Ebersole &. Baney 

Dealers in 
Choice Groceries. Fine Grade of Teas and 

Coffees. Fresh Country Butter and Eggs 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Penna 

Grover Hefflefinger 

Shoes Repaired Shoes Shined 

Hats Cleaned 

S. Market St. ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



For Up-to-Date 

Furnishings 



Men, Women 

and Cbiidren 



I. D. 
BENEMAN*S 

Depl. Store 
■usiiimi MT. JOY, - PA.' 




Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



THE "ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD'' 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year Sample Copies Free 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



Willow Grove 

Poullry Farm 

Emblem and Toulouse Geese Indian Runner 

Ducks, Rose Combed Rhode Island 

Red Chickens 

STOCK F R SALE AND EGGS U SEASON 

DUROC JIKSEY RED HOGS 

J. B. ALDINGER, 

R D Nil 4 Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Go To 

GUY COCHNAUER'S 

Up-to-Date Shaving Parlor 

South Market St., Elizabethtown 



CENTRAL MEAT MARKET 



All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



H. H. GOOD 



ELIZABETHTOWN 



Poorman's Bakery 

Choice Bread, Roils & Cakes 

HUMMELSTOWN ST. 




S. B. KIEFcR 

Notary Public 

Insurance, Heal Kstale ami Collections 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 




GEO. A. FISHER 

HARDWARE 

Automobiles 
Pltonoyraptis ard 
Records 
F. P. GAS PLANTS 

ELIZA BETH TOW X, - I'ENNA. 



p fMni P Dry Goods, Notions, Foot- 



S. Market & Bainbridge Sts. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PA. 



Wear, Carpets, Linoleums 
and Oil Cloths 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



■♦♦♦■l "| i' | i'l "l"H i' H"H"H -****4 "H '*-M' 

Fashionable 



COLUMBIAN 



Plymouth Rocks | J 

« 

« 

: 

X 

X 
X 
X 



THE UTILITY BEAUTY BREED. 
BREITIGAN'S REGAL STRAIN 

True Plymouth Rock and Light 
Brahma crosses reduced to the 
modern fishionable "Rock" type 
and size, res\iliing in constitutidnal 
strength and vigor and wonderful 
laying qualities. 

Eggs and stock f<ir season. 
Write for illustrated circulnr and 
Mating list. 

James H. Breitigan 



LITITZ, PENNA. 



D. C. BRINSER 



Coal 



Grain, Flour, 
Seeds, Hay, 
and Fertilizer. 



Feed, ^ 
Straw > 




Bell & Ind. Phones 

Rheems, - - Pa. 



1 I 

2 Wenn Sie zu Stadt kommeo auf liem * 

«^ Blitzwagen Oder aufdem Eisenbahn, bit- ^ 

£ ten wir Sie fur ein Stieck zer Erfriesch- S 

2 ling. Das Nissley Zitnmer hat schnelle 9 

« Zubereitungen. » 

S 14-16 Kesten Stk.\sze, ♦ 

* LANCASTER, PA. 5 



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.•ou 







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♦ ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



32 



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PLATE GLASS A SPECIALTY. 

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lay morn I DR. 
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SIR RODGER, A TYPICAL OLD ENGLISH COUNTRY 

GENTLEMAN 8 

SCHOOL NOTES 2-18 

RILEY, THE POET 10 

EDITORIALS 12 

CALENDAR FOR COMMENCEMENT WEEK.... 13 

ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE REUNION 13 

INITIATIVE, REFERENDUM, RECALL 14 

VALUE OF DEBATE 15 

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TRIP TO THE SUSQUEHANNA 21 

ALUMNI 23 

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Your needs supplied at 
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and Women of all ages. 
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Don t judge a Clothier by what he promises in print. Judge him by what 

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More and mare 
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feet are getting 
the habit of keep- 
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EDITORIAL STAFF 



Elizabeth Myer Editor-in-Chief 

VV. K. Gish, '14 School Notes 

Mamie Keller, '12 ^^ociety News 

Levi Ziegier, '13 Society News 

W. F. Eshelman, '12 Exchanges 

Leah M. Sheaffer, '09 Alumni Editor 

Ralph W. Schlosser, '11 Business Manager 

Daisy P. Rider, '10 Art Editor 

Published monthly during the school year. 

This paper will be sent continuously to old subscribers, so as not to break their files, and ar- 
rearages charged, unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration. 
Address all business communications to the Business Manager. 
Terms: 50 cents per year ; single copies, 10 cents. 

,{ IMPORTANT! STUDENTS! I 



'* DO YOU KNOW THAT 

TT is only because of the kind patronage of our business and our profes- < ' 
^ ■*• sional men in this town and elsewhere, that this magazine exists. They 
have indeed shown themselves friends of Our College and of " Our Col- 
lege Times." J t 

Therefore, we justly and fairly may ask you, when about to buy any 
thing, to consider first those who by their advertising have made this maga 
• k zine possible- 

We have solicited onlj^ advertisers who are reliable in all respects- 



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BUSINESS MANAGER OF "OUR COIXEGE TIMES 



B«^A n * I i ^ A»»*«<^<^t> n ^<Ww<>ft<W>«w^<^ f «i«W— ift ^ i^m ■ « « ^ii> ■ ««^ « y«y 



Sir Roger, a Typical Old English 
Country Gentleman. 



Jacob E. Myers, '14 



UPON an introduction to Sir 
Roger de Coverley, one is at 
once attracted by his whimsical 
nature. This is expressed in a num- 
ber of ways in his associations with 
his fellow-beings. 

Sir Roger is a gentleman, a country 
squire, who is very singular in his be- 
havior. His singularities do not make 
him an enemy of mankind but they 
are such as proceed from his good 
sense. He does nothing out of sour- 
ness or obstinacy. Hence, his pres- 
ence is enjoyed by men, women and 
even children. 

After he had gained an appreciable 
widow's friendship he was suddenly 
misused by what he called "the per- 
verse widow." From then on, he 
grew careless of himself and never 
dressed as before. He wore a coat 
and doublet that he declared had been 
in and out of style twelve times since 
he first wore it. 

Once when Sir Roger called upon 
the perverse widow, he rapped at the 
door. Then he thought how he might 
best conduct himself so as to gain the 
gtjod graces of the widow. As she 
opened the door, he entered with such 
an "awe that made him speechless." 
The widow admired him above all 
others but she did not wish to marry 
him. He could not understand her.. 
He once said. "She is of all others the 
produce." Often he would spend 
much more time upon trailing a hare 



or some other animal than it would 
take to go to market and buy one. 
most unintelHgible. She either de- 
signs to marry or she does not." 

At court Sir Roger was also a 
prominent figure. He was about the 
only man who had the courage to 
arise and speak to the judge. All the 
country-folk admired him for this. 
But his speech was not at all to the 
purpose of the trial. 

Sir Roger was very proud of his 
ancestors. When visitors came to see 
him he took great delight and pride in 
showing their portraits to them. He 
v/as very much pleased even to show 
the one of his great-great-great grand- 
mother. He explained their natures 
and qualities of character in detail. 

In the church service. Sir Roger al- 
so played an important part. Next to 
the parson. I suppose. Sir Roger was 
the main man. No one would stir af- 
ter the service until Sir Roger arose 
and walked out. During the service, 
1-e would "sufYer no one to sleep" be- 
sides himself, for if by chance he had 
been surprised into a short nap at 
sermon, upon recovering out of it, he 
stood up and looked about, and if he 
saw .my one else nodding, he either 
awakened them or sent his servants to 
them. 

Sir Roger was especially fond of 
hinting. It is said that he distroyed 
"more of those Vermin in one year 
than it was thought the country could 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



But he did it for sport and exercise. 
He even declared to his friends, "that 
if he had not found out this piece of 
exercise, he verily believed he should 
have lost his senses." 

One other commendable quality of 
Sir Roger was his manner of treating 
his servants. He and a few other 
masters treated the servants as they 
deserved to be treated. When his 
servants appeared before him it was 
not for the purpose of faultfinding 
accompanied by threats, and unbe- 
coming language. He really treated 



them so that they soon found out that 
they were no servants. His orders 
were received rather as fa-v i rs than 
as duties. He also rewarded them 
well. This was not done by giving 
his cast clothes to them. He believed 
that this had a bad effect upon them 
and that it created a silly sense of 
equality between master and servant. 
Such was the nature of Sir Roger 
whom everybody loved and respected 
as .he good old Lnglish country 
gentleman. 



SCHOOL NOTES 



The annual trip to Mount Gretna 
for specimens of wild flowers was en- 
joyed by the Botany class and their 
teacher, Prof. H. K. Ober on Friday, 
May 17. They brought back with 
them pleasant recollections and a 
number of fine specimens of plants. 



The apparatus for playing basket 
ball has been removed from the gym- 
nasium and arranged out of doors. 
The floor for this purpose is located 
southeast of Memorial Hall, opposite 
the College barn. 



The flower beds were dug by the 
class in Agriculture who also planted 
the canna bulbs. The geraniums 



were set out by Miss Myer and Mrs. 
Augusta Reber. 

The lilac bushes which were 
brought from the cosy little home on 
the Graybill farm then occupied by 
Prof. Beahm and his family, bore 
flowers for the first time this spring. 
We wish that the fragrance from 
these flowers might be wafted to our 
friends in Virginia who presented this 
shrubbery for the college campus. 

Mr. Dennis is proud of his new driv- 
ing horse. Her name is Jane. She 
does better service than her predeces- 
sor, "Mr. Mule," who, may it be said 
with wishes of peace to his dead 
bones, did as well as his strength en- 
abled him to. 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Riley, The Poet. 



By Mary E. Myers, '10. 



James Whitcomb Riley, the "Hoos- 
ier Poet" of today, who pipes his 
country ditties in quaint and homely 
dialect with genuine humor and poetic 
spirit, was born in the town of Green- 
field, Ind. The name of his birthplace 
recalls one of his familiar poems, 
"Greenfields and Running Brooks." 
We do not know much of his early 
boyhood days, but we learn that when 
James was fifteen years old he ceased 
to attend the public schools of his na- 
tive town, and obeyed the wish of his 
father by studing law. The study of 
law, however, did not appeal to a 
homely child of nature, bubbling over 
with poetry that could not find its waj'- 
into rhyme and stanza, but was con- 
stantly calling him to the woods and 
fields. One summer afternoon the 
little town of Greenfield was a- 
wakcned from its slumbers by the 
noise of patent medicine and concert 
wagon. Riley being as common as 
the country fiddler and full of good 
old fashioned music accepted the posi- 
tion to beat the bass drum for the 
patent medicine men. With no fare- 
wells, the drum and Riley left Green- 
field together. All through the sum- 
mer months he traveled with the 
medicine wagon, "seeing life" for the 
first time, when fall came he was with- 
out means of getting home for the 
v'lntcr, but by the aid of a bucket and 
brush, managed to paint enough signs 
and picket fence? along the homeward 
way to reach Greenfield again. .\s a 
result of his close contact with rural 



and village life he has studied the 
people with a shrewd and sympathetic 
eye. He, unconsciously, gathered a 
great store of knowledge by seeing 
everything and hearing the gossip of 
the country in the village market 
place. 

His first literary production appear- 
ed in a little country paper, which had 
but a brief existence. Through the in- 
fluence of a friend Riley was given the 
position of local editor of the Demo- 
crat, a paper published in the town, 
Anderson. Whatever demanded clev- 
erness, whether sign painting, story 
telling or versifying, he did with skill 
and effectiveness far beyond his com- 
rades. Later he began writing for the 
"Democrat" using in his verse all 
the wit he had been accustomed to use 
in regaling his little circle of friends. 
In time however, his poems were 
thought to be lacking in usefulness for 
a country paper. Nevertheless, Riley 
labored on that verse, until everything 
he saw, heard, touched, tasted or 
smelled resolved itself into rhymes. 
When he lay down to sleep they 
liaunted him all night long. Whole 
cantos of incoherent rhymes danc- 
ed before him so vividly that 
he read them as from a book. 
He became worried because of the 
senseless rhymes that were print- 
ed on his mind, so went gravely to a 
doctor and asked him seriously if he 
didn't think he was crazy. The reply 
that he never saw a poet that wasn't, 
gave Riley some consolation. He con- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



tinued his versifying and finally, Ri- 
ley, once known as a strolling vender, 
sign painter, actor, journalist and 
typical rover, becomes the poet of his 
people. 

His history is deeply written in his 
work ; his environment, his education, 
and his ideals are all reflected in his 
own verse. His poems are the con- 
tinuous story of his own loyal, gentle 
and trustful heart which expresses the 
sane and reasonable conscience of the 
American people. 

Somehow, Riley formed the habit of 
smoking, to which he often resorts 
and finds much pleasure when care- 
lessly and lazily seated in his arm 
chair, thinking of "an old sweet 
heart."' At some leisure hour we find 
him with an old friend talking of 
their lazy boyhood days and of the 
times 

"When they heard the fiddle ring 
Up the curtain of Romance, 

And in crowded public halls 
Played with hearts like juggler's 
balls." 

Then with memories of their revel- 
ry they spent a merry hour with their 
pipes and wine. Yet through all his 
reveries runs a deeper feeling which 
is expressed in his poems. 

Riley, although not a graduate of a 
college is Master of Arts of Yale 
University and a Doctor of Letters of 
Wabash College and University of 
Pennsylvania. 

In his poems to the children he 
touches the human heart. Through 
his aflfection and love for the children 
Riley has made his peace with the 
women, or it may be that each wants 
her poet all to herself, and as long as 
he remains a bachelor she can claim 



him for her own and he is hers. 

Charm, grace and melody are Ri- 
ley's most evident characteristics as 
an artist. He has a deep feeling for 

"The Old Witch," {an original 
the inevitable word that alone ex- 
presses his sense and emotions. His 
unerring dramatic instinct is im- 
portant because it is so rare. Many of 
his poems, some of those we know 
best, are in eflfect little dramas, per- 
fect in setting, an atmosphere wherein 
the characters he has discovered or 
created, are endowed with life and are 
as veritable as though we met and 
talked with them. Examples of his 
felicity crowd upon us such perfect 
and vivid characterizations as "Little 
Orphan Annie," "Good-bye, Jim," and 
"Nothin to say." Few lyrical poems 
in our literature are capable of awak- 
ening the same emotions, and touch- 
ing the same chords as in "Nothin to 
Say." There is crowded into its lines 
a gentleness, a simple and deep affec- 
tion, with so much color, a dialogue 
so apt and a climax so moving that we 
are left rapt and wondering, as at the 
end of a beautiful drama. 

We can recognize his power as en- 
tering sympathetically into the lives 
that are distant from his own in ex- 
perience. This is a wonderful power 
in the poet Riley. We can readily see 
how the memory of his youth could 
make him a great poet, but how could 
a bachelor write "An Old Sweetheart 
of Mine"? How could a man, who 
never had a wife to be absent from 
him write that poem entitled, "When 
She Comes Home."? And how could 
one who had never known parental 
grief over the death of an only child 
write that sweet, low song of comfort 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



called "Bereaved"? We can say that 
much of the power of Riley's poetry 
lies in that strange penetrating sym- 
pathy seen now in humor, and again 
in pathos." 

He does not satirize or ridicule, for 
his humor is of the finer kind that 
seeks for truth and is tempered with 
kindness and justice. His amazing 
sympathy goes out to everybody __and 
everything that needs it. It is the 
kind that sweetens misfortune, and 
makes adversity smile. Toil turns to 
play neath sympathy's touch, and the 
thorns of difificulty bear roses. At 
times he is mastered by sympathy and 
finds himself writing it out in poetry. 
He is of a quality that places him as 



the sentiment and wisdom of the uni- 
versal common man. The people love 
him because he is a part of them. He 
gives that touch of nature that makes 
the whole world kin. His moods are 
the language of the common people. 
He is the interpreter of the heart, the 
voice of the spirit and evangel of the 
higher and real life. There is nothing 
so fine that friendliness of soul that 
knows and understands the sorrows, 
troubles, temptations, joys, hopes, as- 
pirations and all the emotions of other 
souls. These are qualities not found 
in rich abodes, but in the quiet homes 
of the common people where Riley 
loves to dwell. 




The Busy Bees 

SO work the Honey Bees: 
Creatures that, by a rule in na- 
ture, teach 
The art of order to a peopled 
kingdom. 
They have a king, and officers of 

sorts : 
Where some, like magistrates, cor- 
rect at home ; 
Others, like merchants, venture trade 
abroad ; 



Others, like soldiers, armed in their 

stings. 
Make boot upon the Summer's velvet 

buds; 
Which pillage they with merry march 

bring home 
To the tent royal of their emperor ; 
Who, busied in his majesty, surveys 
The singing masons building roofs of 

gold. — Shakespeare. 



OUR COLLE'GE TIMES 



13 



"June is our opportunity, and we 
may as well embrace it. May has 
gone, and we have only the present 
time, which, if we will improve, will 
be of more value than a "silver 
spoon." We are all God's bees, gath- 
ering honey for His hive, I trust. Oh, 
how much sweetness there is around 
us. Life's meadows are overflowing 
with rich and rare perfumes, and flow- 
ers are springing everywhere. Let us 
store up honey for the future ; loving 
and gentle words, little unexpected 
kindnesses, charitable deeds, and daily 
sacrifices these will come back to us 
in golden honey for the Hive of 
Eternity." 

A swarm in May 

Is worth a load of hay; 

A swarm in June 

Is worth a silver spoon ; 

A swarm in July 

Is not worth a fly. — Old Saying. 

Thou shalt not bear false witness 
against thy neighbor. — Ninth Com- 
mandment. 

"You only repeated innocently what 
you heard? Yes, that is the way the 
most of us do; we are surprised that 
such little sayings can ever result in 
harm ; we do not intend to injure any- 
one's good name, or hurt any one's 
feelings, and yet we sometimes 
thoughtlessly do that very thing. Oh, 
let us start afresh this June weather! 
Let us speak about the good we see in 
others, though they have a fault or 
two." 

Calendar for Commencement Week. 
Sunday, June 9, at 7.15 P. M.— Bac- 
calaureate Sermon by Elder J. G. 
Royer, of Mount Morris, 111. 



Monday evening, June 10 — Music 
program, both instrumental and vocal. 
A number of choice solos, duetts, 
trios, quartets and choruses will be 
rendered on this occasion. 

Tuesday evening, June 11 — Com- 
mercial program arranged for gradu- 
ates in Commercial Courses. See 
program on another page of this issue. 

Wednesday afternoon, June 12, 2 P. 
M. — Class Day exercises. The His- 
tory of the Class will be read by Wil- 
liam T. Christman, of Steelton ; the 
future whereabouts of the different 
members of the class will be revealed 
by the prophet, Irene Sheetz, of Eliza- 
bethtown, and the class poem will be 
read by C. L. Martin. 

Wednesday evening, June 12 — Pub- 
lic Alumni Meeting. At this meeting 
Olive A. Myers. '10, will recite, and 
Rev. Charles E. Shoop, '05, will de- 
liver the principal address. See Alum- 
ni Notes for further particulars. 

Thursdaj' morning, June 13, at 9 
A. M. — Commencement Exercises 
proper in the College Chapel. 

All are cordially invited to attend as 
many of these exercises as possible. 

Elizabethtown College Reunion 

All graduates, former teachers and 
students, trustees. Faculty, patron 
and friends of Elizabethtown College 
in general, please be on the lookout 
for an announcement when you reach 
the Annual Meeting grounds of the 
hour and place when our reunion 
shall be held. Don't fail to encourage 
us by your presence and assistance 
which you may in any way be able to 
render in making this meeting one 
long to be remembered. 

The Faculty had planned to close 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



school on June 2 and 3 so as to give 
students and teachers the opportunity 
of attending the Annual Conference 
at York on these days. Their purpose 
was to teach on two Saturdays, May 
18 and 25, instead of the days above 
mentioned; but at the request of the 
student body, it was decided not to 
have school on any of these Saturdays 
but to lengthen the daily lessons so 
as to cover the ground in two days 
less time than is usually required. 

Initiative, Referendum, Recall 

"Vox populi, vox Dei." "The 
voice of the people is the voice of 
God." In past times the idea has been 
prevalent that nations were estab- 
lished by divine power and that mon- 
archs were enthroned by Jehovah and 
were responsible to Him alone. Those 
who held such a doctrine believed 
that the voice of the king is the voice 
of God. But the world is getting 
away from that idea. When the Great 
Republic of China was established, 
four hundred millions, or one-fourth 
of the world's population swung over 
from despotism to democracy. Nearly 
all of the Western Hemisphere, as 
well as France, Portugal, and Switzer- 
land have democratic rule. The 
mighty empires of Germany and 
Great Britain are largely democratic. 
We seem to be entering an era of uni- 
versal self-government. Rank and 
caste are fast becoming obliterated. 
A man's a man to-day. "The voice of 
The people is the voice of God." 

But democracy in its present form 
is not a panacea for all political ills. 
The system is not nearly perfected as 
yet. In order to meet changing needs 
and new difficulties occasional read- 



justment and modification of the po- 
litical machinery are necessary or we 
shall have revolution. Such devices as 
the "initiative," the "referendum," 
and the "recall" are attempts to 
democratize more fully our state gov- 
ernments and to make public servants 
more immediately responsible to the 
people whom they are supposed to 
serve. 

The "initiative" is the power which 
the people have to propose or demand 
legislation. In the states where they 
enjoy this power they present in due 
form their petitions to their respective 
state legislatures asking for the enact- 
ment of such laws as they desire, and 
the wishes of the people must forth- 
with be obeyed. 

The "referendum" is the people's 
power of accepting or rejecting by 
vote the laws made by the legislature. 
The "recall" is the power of the 
people to remove promptly from office 
any unfaithful official in any of the 
departments of the state government, 
or to render of none effect decisions 
handed down by its judges. 

Undoubtedly these devices are an 
effective weapon in the hands of the 
public to prevent officials from be- 
traying their trust when heavy bribes 
are oiifered them by corporations or 
when other selfish interests tempt 
them aside. While they do not de- 
prive us of the valuable service of our 
statesmen and lawyers in public life 
they provide us an efficient check up- 
on these men. 

The initiative and referendum have 
been adopted by South Dakota. Mon- 
tana, Oregon, Missouri, California, 
Colorado, Arkansas and Maine. In 
Washington. Wyoming. Idaho, North 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



Dakota, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and 
jFlorida the people are about to vote 
upon their adoption. — Prof. J. S. 
Harley in a Chapel Talk. 

We acknowledge with sincerest 
thanks to the donor, a check received 
recently from Miss Mary E. Markley 
to be used in purchasing pictures for 
the reception-room. How gratifying 
to know that, though some friends are 
far away, they are still interested in 
our welfare. 

A post card containing a stork ac- 
companied by the following news, 
was received by the editor recently: — 
"Born to Mr. and Mrs. I. A. Shiflfer 
on May 19, a little boy whose name is 
William Carl." Mrs. Shiflfer, (nee 
Hester Boggs) was a student here in 
1904. 

It is with much pleasure that we 
announce that two of our loyal Alum- 
ni, James H. Breitigan and John M. 
Miller, of Lititz, Pa., both members 
of the class of 1905, have agreed to 
give the Physics Department the 
very substantial sum of five hundred 
dollars. It is indeed encouraging to 
see that our Alumni are so true heart- 
ed and loyal to their Alma Mater. 
Such loyalty will inspire others of our 
graduates to stand under the arms of 
their Alma Mater in a material way. 
Thank you, dear Alumni, of Lititz. 

Death of Denmark's King 

King Frederick VIII, of Denmark, 
died alone, unrecognized, and unat- 
tended on the streets of Hamburg, 
Germany, of apoplexy on the night of 



May 14. On the day following, 
Prince Christian, eldest son of King 
Frederick, was proclaimed King of 
Denmark in his father's stead. The 
Prince in a brief speech paid tribute 
to his father and pointed out the diffi- 
culty of succeeding such a rule, con- 
cluding with these words : "May God 
give me strength rightly to rule my 
dear old country, and may it live for- 
ever." 

"Let the fragrant summer-breeze. 
And the apple-buds and blossoms, 

and the wings of honey-bees. 
All palpitate with glee 
Till the happy harmony 
Brings back each childish joy to you 

and me." 

Rev. W. W. Bustard, Pastor of 
John D. Rockefeller's Euclid Avenue 
Church summed up one day what he 
called "The Crying Needs of Amer- 
ica." He says, "What we need is less 
powder and paint, more outdoor sun- 
shine and exercise. Our people need 
less pleasure, more joy, — less society, 
more sociability,— less theatre, and 
more tennis court." 

Value of Debate 

The management of Elizabethtown 
College would encourage the Literary 
Societies of our school to place ques- 
tions for debate on their programs 
more frequently. Should this advice 
come too late to induce improvement 
along this line this year, we hope its 
suggestion may be heeded at the 
opening of the next school year. 

A certain author says: — "The prac- 
tice of debating is more valuable for 
cultivating the faculty of ready ex- 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



temporaneous speech. Whatever may- 
be said of the value of written speech- 
es on other occasions, it is sure that a 
skillful debater must be able to use 
his tongue without his pen. The 
speaker who opens a debate may 
write his first speech, though it will 
be difficult in that case to prevent it 
from becoming a mere essay, but in 
the negative answer and in all that 
follows, the speech must take its form 
at the moment, to be timely and ef- 
fective. In debates prepared for 
special entertainment, it is possible to 
have all debates written, by compar- 
ing the speeches in advance of deliv- 
ery ; but this is scarcely ever done in 
practice and would destroy the charm 
of a real struggle between the two 
sides." 

We think, however, that those who 
wish to become fluent extemporane- 
ous speakers and who are young and 
inexperienced in public speaking, 
should gather their points for debate 
and write them out on paper, making 
choice of the best language possible, 
and then commit to memory their 
speeches before delivering them in 
public, so as to develop the power of 
using the best English possible. 

The school or college that requires 
public speaking in declamation and 
debate offers great advantages for 
improvement along this line. Few 
colleges are doing their whole duty 
towards their students or towards the 
nation in general, in training up men 
and women to have something to say 
and to say it well. There never was a 
time in the history of the world, when 
the man who has something to say, 
and can say it well, had such a splen- 



did opportunity for a hearing, for in- 
fluence, and for power in forwarding 
the great reform movements in the 
world. Two conspicuous modern ex- 
amples are Jacob A. Riis and Booker 
T. Washington, both of whom hav« 
compelled the attention of the world 
because they had a message and could 
tell it well. The one is driving out 
the slums, and rebuilding the homes 
of the poor of one of our greatest 
cities where he is recognized as a 
most useful citizen ; the other is a 
leader of the millions of his race in the 
work of making them really free from 
the bonds of industrial and intellect- 
ual slavery. 



Mr. S. M. Lehigh, a minister in the 
Chuicn of the Brethren and Public 
School teacher, whose home is at 
York Springs in Adams County, 
enrolled as a student recently^ for the 
purpose of reviewing studies neces- 
sary to county teacher's examination. 

On Sunday, May 10, Dr. Reber 
preached a temperance sermon in a 
congregation located in the vicinity of 
McVeytown, Mifflin County, Pennsyl- 



Mess rs. Samuel Fetter and Frank 
Kline called at the college recently on 
a rainy evening to escort one of our 
ladies to her home in town. They 
waited patiently in the hall and talked 
away for dear life as the lady went 
about finishing her tasks of the day. 

R. Condry Long has accepted a 
position as clerk in the office of the 
Kreider Shoe Manufacturing Com- 
pany. We are pleased to note that 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



seven of the clerks, stenographers, and 
book-keepers employed in this office 
have been students and some of them 
graduates of Elizabethtown College. 
They are. Misses Elizabeth Brinser, 
Minerva E. Stauffer, Susan E. Miller, 
Irene Wise, and Messrs. C. M. Neff, 
Charles Bowers, and R. Condry Long. 

Just before closing our contri- 
butions to this issue, we heard the 
news that George H. Light, 07, was 
elected to the ministry in the Hatfield 
congregation, Montgomery County, 
Pennsylvania. We wish him and his 
wife Heaven's richest blessings in the 
performance of the responsible duties 
laid upon them. 

After the inaugural address of Dr. 



Hibben, the honorary degree of LL. 
D. was conferred upon Pres., Taft 
and Chief Justice White, by Andrew 
W. West, dean of the graduate -school. 
President Taft then followed with an 
address appropriate to the occasion. 

On Saturday, May 11, Dr. John 
Grier Hibben was inaugurated Presi- 
dent of Princeton University. At the 
inaugural exercises. Dr. Henry Van 
Dyke opened with Scripture and 
Prayer and Mahlon Pitney, Associate 
Justice of the Supreme Court, and 
trustee of Princeton University ad- 
minstered the oath of office, after 
which John Ackman Stewart, former 
President pro tem. dehvered the 
charter and keys of the university to 
the new president. 



Religious Appointments 

Regular Preaching Services. 

April 21, 7.15 P. M., Sermon- 
Charles Madeira. 

April 28, No services on account of 
S. S. program in town. 

May 5, 7.15 P. M., Sermon — John 
Brubaker, Manheim, Pa. Subject, 
Temperance. 

May 12, 10.30 A. M., Sermon— Prof. 
J. G. Meyer. Subject, Freedom of the 
Will. 

Christian Worker's Meeting. 

April 21, Leader— Wm. K. Kulp. 

May 5, Leader — Virgil Holsinger. 



Prayer Meetings. 

April 17, Leader — Mary Meyers. 

April 24, Leader — Howard Merkey. 

May 1, Leader — Miss Meyer. 

May 8, Leader — Condry Long. 

May 15, Leader — Joshua Reber. 

Sunday Morning Classes. 

"Jesus' Prayer Life," 7.35 A. M. 
Teacher — Miss Stauffer. 

S. S. Lesson, 8.15. Teacher, Miss 
Stauffer. 

Missionary Reading Circle. 

Reading — "Knights of Labarum. 
President — Virgil Holsinger, Teacher, 
Miss Stauffer. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




YoumabcSup 



THE last number of the College 
Lecture Course for 1911 and '12 
was a lecture by Dr. S. C. Schmucker, 
of West Chester Normal School, giv- 
en May 10, his subject being "Some 
Literesting Superstitions." 



Some of the visitors entertained at 
the College during the past month 
were the following: Miss Rhoda New- 
comer, formerly a teacher in Hebron 
Seminary, Va., who visited her sister 
Gertrude, a student here at present; 
Miss Katie Reinhart, of Waynesboro, 
Pa., who just returned from Bethany 
Bible School, Chicago, lUinois, visited 
Miss Kathryn Miller; Miss Florence 
S. Miller, of Ephrata, visited her sis- 
ter, Gertrude; Miss Laura Buckwalter 
of Leola, visited Miss SheafTer; Anna 
M. Wright, Lancaster; Edward C. 
Billet, Columbia; Ira J. Zerker, Flor- 
in ; Laban W. Wingert, Fayetteville ; 
Mr. and Mrs. Garman and son, of East 
Petersburg; Ella Forney, of Lititz : 
Miss Lilian Evans, of Lancaster and 
Miss Ruth Evans, of Bareville, visited 
their cousin, Mrs. C. E. Resser : Aaron 
Gibbel, Ephrata, R. R. 2. 



Sunday Schools, report good interest 
at both places. 



The Sunday School workers from 
the College who are regular attend- 
ants at Stevens Hill and Newville 



Some of our students and teachers 
attended the Temperance Lecture giv- 
en in the United Brethren Church in 
Elizabethtown by Mrs. Mae L. 
Woods, of Mount Vernon, Missouri. 
They were well pleased with the 
lecture. 

Prof. J. G. Meyer gave a talk at a 
Children's Meeting in the Church of 
the Brethren at Harrisburg, Sunday, 
April 28. 

Some of the old superstitions to 
which Dr. Schmucker referred were, 
making fences in the "up going" and 
the ill fortune which people think is 
betokened by the number thirteen. 

Converts made against superstitious 
notions were not so many in and 
about the college. For, only a few 
days after the lecture one of our girls 
remarked, "I know why I had so many 
examinations today. This is the thir- 
teenth of May, and I couldn't answer 
them all either." 

One of the most interesting games 
of baseball that were played on the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



college grounds this spring was the 
one between the Pennsylvania His- 
tory Class, taught by Prof. Schlosser, 
and Prof. Harley's class in German. 
The score was 20 — 5, in favor of the 
Quakers, (Pa. History Class.) The 
main feature of the game was the 
heavy hitting of the Quakers. Other 
points of the game were : 

One home run — Smith. 

One home run — Teeter. 

Several singles — Schlosser. 

One two base — Harley. 

One three base — Longenecker. 

Deatsche Quakers 

Rose, 2b. Schlosser, p. 

Herr, I, p. KiefTer, c. 

Longenecker, lb. Teeter, lb. 
Harley, If. Smith, 2b. 

Christman, c. Snare, 3b. 

Myers, cf. Merkey, If. 

Kreider, 3b. Shank, ss. 

Diehm, rf. Hostetter, cf. 

Reber, A, ss. Herr. W, rf. 



Commercial Notes 

The members of the graduating 
class in Commercial Courses are 
Misses Ava Witmer and Gertrude 
Keller, and Messrs. F. L. Burgess, 
Russel Shank, R. Condry Long, P. M. 
Landis and Isaac Foreman. Four of 
these have already secured employ- 
ment. 

The Commercial Program for Com- 
mencement Week is as follows : 

Music. 

Invocation, Prof. H. K. Ober. 

"Co-operation," Russel Shank. 

"The Better Way," P. M. Landis. 

Music. 

"Ideals vs Lives," R. Condry Long. 

"The Oil of Business Machinery," 
F. L. Burgess. 



"The Pivotal Point," Ava Witmer. 
Music. 

Address, Hon. H. Frank Eshleman, 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Music. 

On Sunday evening. May 5, a very 
interesting Temperance program was 
rendered by the Christian Workers 
in the College Chapel. Dr. Reber was 
the chairman for this meeting. 

The different features were as fol- 
lows : "A Picture of the Present Con- 
dition of the Drink Evil," by J. E. 
Myers; Recitation, "At the Stroke of 
Nine," Harry Moyer; Essay, "The 
Responsibility of Our Young People 
to the Temperance Cause," Martha 
Martin ; "The Outlook as to the Fu- 
ture of Intemperance," Prof. J. S. 
Harley ; Temperance sermon by Rev. 
John Brubaker of the Fairview con- 
gregation, Lancaster county. 

This was Brother Brubaker's first 
visit to the College. His sermon was 
very much appreciated. We hope he 
will come soon again. 



Many of the College girls and three 
of the lady teachers are members of 
the Gleaner's Adult Bible Class 
taught by Prof. J. Z. Herr. The 
Christian Worker's program, render- 
ed in the Church of the Brethren at 
Elizabethtown on Sunday evening. 
May 12, was in charge of this Bible 
Class and the theme of the evening 
was "Mother, Her Influence and the 
Honor due all Devoted Mothers." 
This impressive Christian Worker's 
meeting was followed by a Bacca- 
laureate Sermon, preached in the 
Church of the Brethren by Elder G. 
N. Falkenstein, to the graduates of 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the Elizabethtown High School. The 
Board of Education, and the teachers 
and pupils were present in a body. 
Elder Falkenstein took his text from 
Ephesians 6, his theme being "The 
Armor of a Christian Soldier." Most 
of the college teachers and students 
attended these services together with 
many patrons of the High School. 

Mr. Charles E. Resser, who has 
charge of the Geography classes this 
year, has spent several Saturdays in 
jaunts through the country with mem- 
bers of his classes and other college 
folks who were interested. 

Keystone Notes 

The K. L. S. met in regular execu- 
tive session April 19. The program 
was postponed from April 12 on ac- 
count of the Anniversary Exercises. 
The chief features were the piano and 
the vocal solos and the recitation by 
Mary Sheaflfer. 

The program rendered May 3, was 
a "Riley" program. A large audience 
did him honor by their presence. The 
following program was rendered: 

Music— "The Goblins'll Git You if 
You Don't Watch Out"— College Hill 
Quartet. 

Character Sketch of Riley — Mary 
Myers. 

Recitations — "Nothing to say," 
"When the green gits back on the 
trees" — Rebekah SheafFer. 

The "Bear Story" — Kathryn Miller. 

Recitation— "That Old sweetheart 
of Mine," — Edgar Diehm. 

Vocal Solo— "There Little Girl. 
Don't Cry." — Kathryn Miller. 

Recitation — "When the frost is on 
the pumpkin." — Irene Wise. 

Address on "Riley's Life," by Miss 



Myer, who substituted for Prof. Ober. 

Literary Echo — Irene Sheetz. 

Music — "Come Sing a Merry Song" 
—College Hill Quartet. 

Saturday evening. May 11, the So- 
ciety met in regular executive session. 
The principal features were Parlia- 
mentary Drill, and a declamation by 
Harry Royer. The newly elected 
officers are — President, Walter Herr, 
Vice President — Harry Longenecker, 
Secretary — Ada Brandt, Editor — Re- 
bekah Sheaflfer, Critic — Virgil Hol- 
singer. 

Homerian News 

The officers for the last term of this 
school year have been elected. They 
are — Speaker, Chas. E. Resser; Vice 
President, I. .J. Kreider; Chaplain, 
Miss Leah Sheaflfer; Monitor, Jacob 
E. Myers; Recording Secretary, Mary 
Myers; Critic, Prof. Ober. 

On account of the lecture by Dr. 
Schmucker on Friday evening, May 
10, the public meeting which was to 
be held on that evening was post- 
poned until Friday evening. May 24. 
The program rendered was as fol- 
lows : 

Invocation by the chaplain. Miss 
SheafTer. 

Recitation, — "Afloat on a Flood," 
Nora Reber. 
Story) by Mr. Waltz. 

Some Lessons from Browning, by 
Prof. Walter Gish; and Criticisms by 
the Critic, Prof. Ober. 

The program was interspersed with 
selections of music. 



What Friends Are Doing 

The agricultural department is very 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



happy to report that the college farm 
and truck patch are in fine shape and 
look very promising. 

The department has received the 
following splendid gifts which are 
more appreciated than words can ex- 
press. Allen S. Ober, a close friend of 
the college, residing near Milton 
Grove, has donated the use of a very 
excellent hor.se. 

Henry L. Hess, the efficient su- 
pervisor of Elizabethtown, has donat- 
ed the use of his horse during the 
spring plowing season. Mr. Allen 
Coble of near Elizabethtown, who ha? 
"been a patron of the College for a 
number of years, donated a plow, and 
the implement firm of W. B. Schneit- 
man & Son have also donated a plow. 
We wish these kind friends might 
know how much these acts of gener- 
osity on their part are appreciated. 
To say we thank them is only feebly 
expressing our gratitude. 

The following friends have donated 
a hen to the College poultry yard: 
Ralph Martin, Mrs. Binkley, Mrs. 
Brill, Mrs. John Gibble. Mrs. S. H. 
Hertzler, Daniel Shank, Sr., Daniel 
Shank, Jr., and H. K. Ober. More are 
promised. We have twenty-three 
little chicks and two hens sitting. Mr. 
Dennis reports that at present there 
are hens and one rooster in the 

yard. By fall we hope to have fifty 
hens and pullets. 

Prof. H. K. Ober, with the class in 
Elementary Agriculture, has pruned 
all the peach trees and berry bushes. 
The peach trees are cut back to mere 
bare branches from 12 to 24 inches 
long. This seems severe pruning but 
I guess he knows what he is doing. 
He reports that under favorable con- 



ditions there likely will be about fifty 
bushels of strawberries. The grape 
vines, raspberries and blackberries 
are in bloom and all look promising. 

Our janitor, S. B. Dennis, with the 
assistance of Samuel Heisey, is plant- 
ing sweet potato sprouts, corn, broom 
corn and other truck. It is the am- 
bition of this department to make the 
truck patch a valuable asset to the 
College in several ways. 



Trip to the Susquehanna 
The "local division of the Geograph- 
ical Survey of E'town College," ex- 
perienced their first trip on Saturday, 
May 11. This august band was com- 
posed of Professors Harley and Ress- 
er, and the Misses Rebekah Sheafifer, 
Mary Sheafifer, Shelley, Brubaker, 
Harshberger and Newcomer. 

The most excellent success with 
which this party met was due partly 
to the early start which was not a 
minute later than 6.15 a. m. One of 
the first things of interest which at- 
tracted the attention of this wide 
awake group upon leaving the train at 
Conewago, was a volcanic bomb sup- 
posed to have been hurled there from 
a formerly active volcano in that vi- 
cinity. 

After traveling but a short distance 
further, the unusual number and size 
of the boulders aroused much com- 
ment. After inquiring of their Pro- 
fessor the cause of these, the young 
ladies were informed that these were 
the result of a dyke which was 
brought about in prehistoric ages. 
The frequent questions, "What is 
this, Professor? and the immediate 
answer, "It is a dyke," made the party 
believe that the only excuse for the 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



existence of Elizabethtown and the 
surrounding country, was a dyke. 
Perhaps, more especially, were they 
made to believe that the term "dyke" 
is a favorite expression of Prof. Res- 
ser's when he is too often interrogated 
concerning these strange phenomena. 

It has been learned that quite fre- 
quently the entire party was startled 
by the horrifying screams, a method 
the girls used to announce the sudden 
appearance of that terrible creature, 
the turtle. 

About midway between E'town and 
their destination the party paused to 
rest and make a search in a near by 
graveyard for the "proverbial rabbit." 
With poor results, this happy crowd 
moved on and accomplished that un- 
usual feat of reaching Governor's 
Stables at about 10.15 A. M. 

A most delightful spot near this 
place was a rendezvous for all those 
who were weary, worn, and hungry. 

A very pleasant hour was spent 
here, during which the girls' un- 
quenchable thirst and ravenous appe- 
tites were slightly appeased. Much of 
this extreme satisfaction was afforded 
them by Prof. Harley, who, after 
many eflforts, was successful in get- 
ting six pies. 



Much refreshed, the teachers and 
students proceeded to climb over the 
rocks, but several whose early train- 
ing in climbing had been neglected 
were left behind. It was said by one 
of the chaperons that the girls at- 
tainments along this line were re- 
markable even overtowering those of 
the boys who made a similar trip the 
previous Saturday. 

Being very ambitious as well as en- 
ergetic, the Society moved west along 
a small creek toward the river which 
was reached in due time. At the sug- 
gestion of the ladies, the party spent 
a short time resting for the benefit of 
the Professors whom they feared 
might be unable to reach home if this 
were not done. 

It was not long, however, until the 
croup, full of new inspiration, were 
homeward bound. After frequent in- 
tervals of rest, the party feeling much 
indebted to their teacher for the in- 
teresting lessons given them from the 
"Book of Nature," reached E'town at 
5.30 p. m. having tramped eighteen 
miles and having seen enough to 
make the day a memorable one to all 
of the party. 




OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 




COMMENCEMENT is coming! 
Alumni Day will soon be here ! 
June 12 is the eventful day! 
Rev. Chas. W. Shoop, '05, who will 
sail for China as a missionary some- 
time this year, has been secured to 
give the chief address of the evening. 

Miss Olive Myers, '10, is expected 
to be with us to give a recitation. All 
who know her elocutionary powers 
will want to hear her. 

Every one will be glad to know that 
S. G. ]\reyer, '10, will be the orator 
for the occasion. These features will 
be interspersed with music so that the 
entire program will be interesting and 
worth hearing. Don't miss it ! 

Prof. J. G. Meyer, '05, gave a talk 
at a Children's Meeting in the Church 
of the Brethren at Harrisburg, Sun- 
day, April 28. He also preached 
morning and evening on Sunday, May 
19, in the Woodbury church, Balti- 
more, Md. 

Prof. R. W. Schlosser. '06, has been 
chosen by the General S. S. Board to 



teach a class of young people from the 
ages of sixteen to twenty, at the an- 
nual conference on Sunday, June 2. 

Are you interested in reading Alum- 
ni News? If so, why not send us par- 
ticulars about yourself that College 
friends ought to know, and would be 
much pleased to hear? 

Have you subscribed to the endow- 
ment fund? If not. Commencement 
is a good time to do it. If you can't 
be present send your contribution to 
James Breitigan, Lititz, or to Dr. Re- 
ber. 

Elizabethtown College will hold a 
reunion at the Annual Conference at 
York. Every Alumnus ought to be 
there to help make it a success. A 
committee is now at work on a pro- 
gram, which no doubt will be very in- 
teresting. Every loyal son or daugh- 
ter of E'town should be there. 

Keep looking for an invitation to 
the Alumni supper! Don't fail to re- 
ply! Don't fail to be present! 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




-li'.^ai*-.. L— >J-*....iL .—..J**.-,. J. -•«.«i«M.,vet-.. «. i,«i.i.W.i.r .. 



AS the schools and colleges will 
have closed their year's work 
before the next number of our 
paper will be published, we take this 
opportunity to have a final interview 
with our Exchanges. It has given us 
a great deal of pleasure to peruse the 
pages of the excellent papers that 
have come to our table. In most of 
them a general improvement is evi- 
dent. However some of them still 
cling to the old formalities laid down 
by former Editorial staffs. We wish 
to thank all for the criticisms given on 
our paper, whether favorable or un- 
favorable. In some instances we have 
ventured to offer suggestions where 
they were deemed necessary. We 
trust these criticisms have been taken 
in the spirit in which they were given. 
We bid all our Exchanges "adieu," 
and hope they will continue to hold 
their place in college journalism. 

The Senior number of Carlisle Ar- 
row is the first paper edited by a 
Senior class to come to our notice this 
year. This issue deserves congratu- 
lations for it seems that no pains were 



spared to make this one very interest- 
ing. The magazine is w^ell arranged 
and contains several good stories and 
orations. The cuts of the graduation 
exercises add to the attractiveness of 
the Senior number. 

Targum, Gettysburgian. Ursinus 
Weekly, Purple and Gold, and Carlisle 
Arrow are the weekly publications 
which have been received throughout 
the year. They give us the inside 
news of the respective institutions. 
Occasionally an essay or an oration 
adds to the general interest of the 
periodical. 

"How dear TO their hearts are 
THE memor'ble Schooldays 

WhEn foNd recollectlOns pRE- 
Sent them to view ! 

The cramming and jamming, the 
deep-tangled essays. 

And every weak spot their ex- 
aminer knew: 

The wild spreading Greek and the 
verbs that stood by it. 

The bloomin' old Xenophon 
marching again. 

The chemistry, physics, the German 



OUR COLLEGE^ TIMflS 



25 



room nigh it ; 

Some love the rude pony while 
others refrain ; 

The love stricken Horace, the iron 
bound Homer, 

The moss covered logic that hung 
to their brain." — Ex. 

"What can we, as American citi- 
zens, do to prolong the life of our na- 
tion, to expand and develop her re- 
sources, and so to preserve her that we 
can hand her down to our posterity a 
priceless heritage, a jewel of great 
value? The answer is "Cast out her 
worst besetting sin, Drunkenness."— 
Susquehanna. 

Lady— "You look robust, young 
man. Are you equal to the task of 
sawing wood?" 

Tramp— "Equal ain't the word, 
mum. I'm superior to it. Good 
morning." — Ex. 

"The great architect alone sees in 
that huge marble mass the most 
beautiful and symmetrical of archi- 
tectural masterpieces. The mere 
workmen do not and cannot under- 
stand the real character of that which 
they build. So with our growing 
little human lives ; each is contribut- 
ing, however blindly, to the erection 
of a wonderful temple. Each has 
some necessary part of it, without 
having had even a glimpse of the 
whole plan." — Albright Bulletin. 

"The measuring of success is not 
the number or greatness of achieve- 
ments, but it is the manner in which 
they are made ; how much efifort, zeal 
and self-sacrifice were put into the 
making of success. If one should be 
credited with a gift to his fellow-men 
which was the result of no effort, en- 
cumbered with no difficulties, his is 



not so great a success as one who toils 
patiently and persistently, hampered 
by difficulties, and gives himself en- 
tirely to his work. One cannot but 
feel proud of an achievement which 
was the result of all his efforts." — Car- 
lisle Arrow. 

Father (at dinner)— "Johnny, how 
did you get along at school today?" 

Johnny — "Papa, our physiology 
says that conversation at the table 
should be of a pleasant nature." — Ex. 

"No time in the history of our na- 
tion was ever riper than the present 
for the influence of men of conviction, 
men with firm principles of righteous 
government. Octopus-like corpora- 
tions now hold power in every branch 
of our governmental affairs. The 
common people are oppressed. Men 
who cannot be baited for with silver 
hook should hold the reins of govern- 
ment. Men must rise who will turn 
aside this stream of corruption and 
cleanse its channels. Principles of dis- 
honesty cannot long prevail against 
those of right. Men who dare strive 
for clean government will come. May 
they come from the schools and col- 
leges of our land, men whose convic- 
tions of honest government for all. 
fixed like a polar star, will guide them 
to free this fairest portion of the 
earth's surface." — College Student. 

We gratefully acknowledge the fol- 
lowing Exchanges : — Normal School 
Herald, Susquehanna, Shamokin High 
School Review. Philomathean Month- 
ly, Juniata Echo. Albright Bulletin, 
Ursinus Weekly, Targum, Purple and 
Gold, M. H. Aerolith. Gettysburgian, 
College Student, Washington Collegi- 
an. Delaware Review, Western Mary- 
land College Monthly. 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Faculty 



D. C. REBER, A. M., Pd. D., President 
Philosophy, Pedagogy, German. 

H. K. OBER, Pd. B., Vice-President. 
Biological Science, Agriculture, 
Surveying. 

ELIZABETH MYER, M. E., 
Reading and Grammar. 

J. G. MEYER, Pd. B., A. B., Secretary, 
Mathematics, Physical Science, 
Greek. 

J. Z. HERR, Prin. Commercial Dept., 
Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Com- 
mercial Law. 

JACOB S. HARLEY, A. B., 

Algebra, German and Civics. 

LYDIA STAUFFER, 
English Bible.. 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Pd. B., 
Piano, Orogan, Drawing. 



R. W. SCHLOSSER, Pd. B., A. B., 

English, Latin, French. 
KATIE E. MILLER, 

Director of Vocal Music, Voice 

Culture. 
ELIZABETH KLINE, 

Piano, Voice. 
ANNA W. WOLGEMUTH, 

Shorthand and Typewriting. 
W. K. GISH, Pd. B., 

U. S. History. 
C. E. RESSER, 

Geography, History and Mathe- 
matics. 
LAURA B. HESS, 

Sewing. 

DAISY P. RIDER, Pd. B., 

(Absent on Leave.) 
ELD. S. H. HERTZLER, 

Exegesis (Bible Term.) 



50 N. QUEEN ST. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Our new and iarger store enables us to give you th' best sei^'ice possible in the Jewelry btisin 

SILVERWARE of the very best quality at prices most reasonable. 

WATCHES. Our ranee in price is from $160 to $1.00. 

CLOCKS. From $300 chime clocks to the alarm clock at 85 cents. 

EYE-GLASSES anti SPECIACLES fitted to the eyes with no charge for examication. 



:be< 



ell<d i 



: always welccn 



D. Walter Miesse 

The College and School Photographer 

INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP 



PORTRAITS 



Bell Telephone 290J 

24 WEST KING STREET, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



27 



GEO. R. KERSEY ^ ! .IMIiaillliain»^iDUIIIHIIliKn^^^^^ 

I s College Jewelry of the Better Sort g 



DENTIST 



ELIZABEl-HTOWN, 



G.Wm.REISNERl 



TOOTH BRUSHES, FLESH BRUSHES, ! | 

SPONGES, Etc. ■ I cia, 



Manufacturing 
Jeweler 



A. W. CAIN 



and Rings 
~ Fraternity Jewelry 

s LANCASTER, PA 



Prize Caps ■ 
Medals I 



AVE DO IT RIGHT 

Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES ^ SON 



F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 

GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 



HORSESHOEING 
North Varket Street- 



SPECIALTY 
EUZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. R. LEI CHT 

Manufacturer ofFJne VchlcleS 

Repainting and Rejair Worli Given Careful Attention 
EUZABETHTOWN, PA. 



LEO KOB 

Heating and 

Plumbing 




FRANK H. KELLER 

Dealer In Fancy and Staple Groceries 
Provisions, Etc. 

Our Hightst Ambition to Please You. 



BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO SUPPLIES FOR SALE 
Centre Square 



J. CROFF & SONS 

Meat Marlcet 

NORTH MARKET ST. 

4| Those who are judges of good Ice Cream say that * 

I Miesse's Ice Cream ^ 

* is tlie most Delicious and Satisfying 

5 they bave eaten. Try it for yourself 

* We serve Parties, Wedilings, Dinners 
j^ and Receptions with cakes and ice cream 

* witti perfect satisfaction. 

D. W. IWIESSE, 123 N. Queen St., Lancaster 
r Ice Cream sold in Elizabethtown by J. C. Gross 



UP TO DATE 

Shaving and Hair Cutting 

R. H. SHISSLER. 

Chas^ B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



28 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



K««^«««^«««««««««««««««««««« First-Class Shoe Roepairing 

§ /. £^, 1D1^L^\^L^1\. ^ "Work Guaranteed Pricei Reasonable 

* I RUBBER HEELS make WALKING EASY 
S For Koofine, Spouting, Tin and ? 
5 Granite Ware Mill; Cans, Radi- ,> JOHN C. BERBERIAN, E, High St. 

ators, PortableFurnaces, Granite * __ 

. . J 

5 ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

.p.™.... i\h. H. BRANDT i 

* ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. * % Dealer in {. 
»»***»**^**»*»»#»****«r;y**$*s^*«r J ^LL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL t 



Lisk Roasters in four sizes, or 
any special orders in my line. 
Give me a trial. 

Opp. E.'.changc Bank 



*/**************************«** 



SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 



i W. R. Ashenfelter % I 



$ CHOICE BREAD AND 
S CAKES 



2 Weddings and Parties supplied with 9 

* Fancy Cakes at short notice. » 

I t 

S S. MARKET ST., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA $ 

« » 



J Elizabothtown, - - Penna. 1 

• 4 

E. L. RENSEL 

General Blacksinithinf 
and Repair Work 
Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

Park St., Elizabethtown, Pa 



Fiain Suits, Ready-Made or Ordered, at ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«« ♦♦< «< 

ADOLPH GANSMAN'S 

Clothier 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange St'., Lancaster, Pa 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

Dental Parlors 



1912 
Model 



S. J. HETNDEL, Dentist. 



Tonring Car 

8900.00 
RunabontSSOO 




Fully Equipped at Above Prices 
Call on or Address 

H. S. NEWCOMER, - Mt. Joy, Pa. 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

ROLLER MILLS: 

J. F. BINKLEV, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades of 

FLOUR AND FEED 

Highest Cash Prices paid for grain, 
hay and straw 

ELIZABETHTOWN. - PEX\. 

♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« ♦♦♦♦♦ 

5 AND lOc STORE 

Let us make your .Nickels, Himes and 
Quarters do doulile duty. .Nothing in the store 
is priced more than Idc and from that ilown. 

M. W. ESHENOWER 
ELIZABETHTOWN', - PENNA. 

John A. Fisher 

BARBER 



Centre Square. 



Elizabethtown. Pa 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



29 



Chas. R. Boggs, Restaurant 

First-Class cTWeals at All Hours 



Oysters In Season 



Confectionery", Ice Cream 



S. G. HERSHEY % 

♦ 

Groceries, Dry ♦ 

Goods and ♦ 

Notions ♦ 



PENNA. ♦ 



f ELIZABETHTOWN, 

♦♦♦♦♦O^^^O »»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

JACOB FISHER 

Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Center Square, EUzabethtown, Penna. 

With you for 31 years. That's All 




Bell and Ind. Pbones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers In 

New and Old Books 

East Orange St., Lancaster, Pa 

CHOICE MEATS 

A. K. Young 

EMZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



For All Kinds of 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & McBride 
ELIZABETHTOWN. - PES 



Hours 8 to 



DR. JEROME G. HESS 
DENTIST 



Hertzler Bldg. 
EUzabethtown Pa. 




Ebersole & Baney 

Dealers in 
Choice Groceries, Fine Grade of Teas and 

Coffees, Fresh Country Butter and Eggs 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Penna 



Grover Hefflefingen 

Shoes Repaired Shoes Shined 

Hats Cleaned 

S. Market St. EIyIZABETHTO\VN. PA. 




For Up-to-Date 

Furnishings 



Men, Women 

and Cblldren 



I. D. 
BENEMAN'S 

Dept. Store 
fPumoBB MT. JOY, - PA. 



30 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of 5^ our Patronage 



THE ''ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD'' 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year Sample Copies Free 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



^=^ 



Willow Grove 

Poullry Farm 

Emblem and Toulouse Geese. Indian Runner 

Ducks, Rose Combed Rhode Island 

Red Chickens 

STOCK Fi R SALE A^D EGGS \H SEASON 

DUROC JEKSEY RED HOGS 

J. B. ALBINGER. 

R D No 4 Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Go To 

GUY GOCHNAUER'S 

Up-to-Date Shaving Parlor 

South Market St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

CENTRAL MEAT MARKET 

All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



H. H. GOOD 



KlilZABETHTOWN 



Poorman's Bakery 

Choice Bread, Roils & Cakes 

HUMiVIErLSTOWN ST. 




Notary Public 

Insurance, lieal Kstate and Collections 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

["^G^rAJFISHER^i 

HARDWARE \ 

< Automobiles 

< Phonographs and 
C Records 

< F. P. GAS PLANTS 

\ ELIZABETHTOWN, - I'ENNA. 



p P|Un| P Dry Goods, Notions, Foot- 



S. Market & Bainbridge Sts. 
ELIZABETHTOWN. - PA. 



Wear, Carpets, Linoleums 
and Oil Cloths 



Mention Our Gillege Times When Writing. 



^ ♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• H"H"H -'I' 

Fashionable i 

COLUMBIAN I 

Plymouth Rocks 

THE UTILITY BEAUTY BREED. 
B R E I TIGAN'S REGAL STRAIN 

True Plymouth Rock and Light 
Brahma crosses reduced to the 
modern fishionable "Rock" type 
and size, resulting in constitutional 
strength and vigor and wonderful 
laying qualities. £ 

Eggs and stock for season. % 
Write for illiistraled circulnr .Jiid * 
Mating list. % 

James H. Breitigan | 

Box CT. UTITZ, PENNA. t 



WE ARE AFTER YOU ♦ 

cTVIR. cTVlAN : 

♦ 

We want you for a customer, so we ♦ 

tempt you with a store full of uncommon ♦ 

values. Come and bee them. Sooner X 

or later you are going to find out the J 

advantage of quality, service and price, ^ 

to be obtained here. The sooner you i 

do it the better it will be for vou. ♦ 



il/ 








Wenn Sie zu Stadt kommen auf dem 
Blitzwagen oder auf dem Eisenbahn, bit- 
ten wir Sie fur ein Stieck zer Erfriesch- 
ung. Das Nissley Zimmer hat schnelle 
Zubereitungen. 

14-16 Kesten Str.^sze, 
LANCASTER, PA. 



Our customers are all pleased custom- 
ers, because we really stand back of 
everything we sell. 



I MARTIN 

♦ Clothier and Furnisher 

ElilZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Our Advertisers aire Wprthyo^ Yoqr Patronage. 



************************************ ***A*********************^ 

ItHE ^ BOOK ^ STORE 



Books, Stationery, School 

Supplies and Post 

Cards 



Sunday School Supplies 

and Mottoes 

Mail Orders Solicited 



: C. N. FALKENSTEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



ipatntinG anb IPaper 
IbanGing 

AMOS B. DRACE 

J. M. BENNER 

FREIGHT, BAGGAGE and EXPRESS 
Furniture, Pianos, Machinery 

PLATE GLASS A SPECIALTY. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



qA. w. martin 

COAL, WOOD. GRAIN 
FLOUB and FEED 



Telephone 
ELIZ.1BETHTOWN, 



GRAYBILL 




College Hill Dairy 

Fresh milk and cream daily. All milk 
tested for children; free from tuberculosis 

HOTELS AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED 



TAKE YOURj 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday morniDK. 
Returns Wednesday and Friday afternooD. 

J. RALPH GROSS 



THE BARBER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



I O. TV. HEISEY I 

■^ Provisions, Groceries, CS, Choice Candies ^ 

iS HEISEY BUILDING ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. ^ 




era n-t t nf 




THE PILLARS OF 'IHE NATION 8 

THR TRUE OBJECT OF EDUCATION 10 

COMMENCEMENT WEEK 12-16 

Music Program 13 

Commercial Program 13 

Class Day 13 

Class Song 14 

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 14-18 

LIFE'S BEST INVESTMENT 16 

EDITORIALS 19 

SCHOOL NOTES 21 

ALUMNI 23 

EXCHANGES 25 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



EVERYBODY'S STORE 



ELIKABETHTOWN 
PBNNA. 



Your needs supplied at 
.satisfactory prices in Dry 
Goods, Groceries, Ready- 
to-Wear Clothing lor Men 
and Women of all ages. 
Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oil- 
Cloth, Shoes, Etc. 

Polite attention. 
Square dealing. 
Guaranteed satisfaction. 




Agents for Made-to- 
measure 

CLOTHING 

International Tailoring Co. 
New York 

Star Tailoring Co. 

Chicago. 

American Ladies Tailoring Co. 

Chicago 

IJp-to-Date Samples 

On Hand 



HERTZLER BROTHERS AND COMPANY 

W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT. Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier. 



U. S. DEPOSITORY 

Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits Over $145,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid op 
special deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 











DIRECTORS 




W. S. Smith 


Elmer W. Strlckler 


Peter N. Rutt 


F. W. Qroff 


J. S. Rlsser 


B. L. Oeyer 


B. 0. OInder 


Amos O. Coble 


E3. E. C«bl« 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



'! "The House Of Good Clothes" - 

Don t judge a Clothier by what he promises in print. Judge him by what 
he puts on your back. 







i 



We invite the severest probe into the value of our Ready to Wear or Tailored 
I ► to Measure Clothing. 

"THE STORE ACCOMMODATING" 

,► S. M. MYERS 6l CO., I^aSSI^t^^^pV"" 

CLOTHIERS, HATTERS AND FURNISHERS * * 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



SHOES 



I i 



ipiiiiiBiiiiiBiiiiHiiiuaioiiaiiiiiniiiiBiiuiaiiiiiBiniiHiiiiBiiiiiBiiiiHiiiiiB 



More and more J 
E 1 i z a b ethtown * 
feet are getting •}• 
the habit of keep- £ 
ing comp'ny -with ^ 
our Shoe Depart- 4* 
ment. There's a ^ 
reason of course. * 
Prices very, very 4» 
easy on the purse ^ 
and easy on the T 
feet. Shoes for * 
for the -nrhole 4. 
family. T 



Huntzbcrgcr-Wintcrs Co. t 

Department Store || 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. % 







This space is reserved for 
The ELIZABETHTOWN 
& MARIETTA ELEC- 
TRIC LIGHT CO. 



iiiiiinBiiiiHiiiiiaiiiiiaiiia ■ii:iHiiiinnqBiiiiiBiiiHiimii;iiniiiig;r 



COLUMBIAN and RED CROSS : I | WE EARNESTLY SOLICIT A 

Heaters and Ranges. | * liberal patronage 



THE FINEST LINES MADE 




LUMBER 

AND mill-work 

Cement, Slate, 

Snckett Plaster Boiird. 

Patent Plaster. 

Ruberoid Rooflng, 

White Coat^ 

Mapes & Miller's Fertilizer, 

Ruberino Paint, 
and all kinds ot 

Building Material. 
We aim to jfive a si|uare deal that will 
merit your trade and friendship. 
Give us a trial. 

MUTH BROTHERS. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



********** ** **** * * ** 1 1 M .♦f♦♦^ 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



UIII!Bllliailll!ai>IIIBi»!l!ll!IK!'lBI!llllllliBniBlliailllia! 

GET THIS BIG 
POULTRY REFERENCE BOOK 




GREID£R'S FINE CATAI.OG | 

1912 has 2J4 pp Lontainir^ ')7 piLlures of show fowls ^ 



m B. H. GKEIDER.BoxC, RHEEMS PA D 

jiiiii!«iiiiiDiii{n<riBi :aiiiiniMiiimiiiiniiiiiBiiniaiii'ui!ii!BiwiD~ 

»!**#*#**«.-C-44««*«*** *********** 
f. * 

^ You Can Improve Your Jj 



* By Subscribing for * 
J THE BUSINESS EDUCATOR » 
% % 
^ By Practicing from * 

* THE ZANER METHOD MANUAL * 
% I 
^ or By Attending * 
2 THE ZANERIAN COLLEGE * 



2 For Circulars, Prices, Etc. * 

S Apply to ^ 

I ZANER & BLOSER CO. | 

^ Penmanship Specialists 9 

J Columbus, - - Ohio I 



We Are Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
Made To Order 

Plain 
Clothing 

In This Country 



When in Lancaster it will pay 
you to visit ours, the only 
Clothing Store in that city that 
has One Price to All and gives 
discounts to none. See us for 



Men's Ready Made and 
Made to Order 

Clothing 

AND 

Furnishings 



Youth's and Boys' 
Clothing 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Since J854 at 
Centre Square. Next to City flail 

L«incaster. Pa. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



^ ^^^^ <^<^^*^** *^, < ^* *^^ 1, ' 1^ * i • ** ** * * **^ • * ** ** **** ** ****** ** **l 1 1 1 ii < i > » * 



ii Greater Speed— Greater Accuracy- 
Greater Efficiency- are tlie 
:; logical results of installing the 

I UNDERWOOD 
Typewriter 




EXCLUSIVE Underwood features make possible the most important labor- 
saving systems of modern accounting. 

The ever growing demand puts the annual sales of the Underwoods far 
ahead of those of any other machine — making necessary the largest typewriter 
tactory and the largest typewriter office building in the world. 

Such a demand from busines^ men everywhere is unquestionable evi- 
dence of the practical mechanical superiority of 

"The Machine You Will Eventually Buy." 

Underwood Typewriter Co.«- 

UNDERWOOD BUILDING NEW YORK 



(§m OlnUfgf ®tmp0 



Elizabkthtown, Pa., July, 1912 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Elizabeth Myer Editor-in-Chief 

Mamie Keller, '12 Society News 

V. C. HoUmger, '13 Society News 

W. F. Eshelman, '12 Exchanges 

Leah M. Sheaffer, '09 Alumni Editor 

Ralph W. Schlosser, '11 Business Manager 

Daisy P. Rider, '10 Art Editor 



Published monthly during the school year. 

This paper will be sent continuously to old subscribers, so as not to break their files, and ar- 
rearages charged, unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration. 
Address all business communications to the Business Manager. 
Terms: 50 cents per year ; single copies, 10 cents. 



|»jn^/|y>iiiO^/^ n M^H y » M W^ f ^ n W ^/ ^w >»i« ^ |^ w W^/^> ' W^/^w<« V^ii«><^^|y»-P| 

IMPORTANT! STUDENTS ! 

.«^/^ ■» »wf^^^ lm ■ w ^/V't* tf ^^l/Wi^ »<i / |/Wi*« — <j/^» m »wf^^tm> » <^|^ ■* »»i^/Wi«» ^ w i^/W 

DO YOU KNOW THAT 

XT IS only because of the kind patronage of our business and our profes- 
■*■ sional men in this town and elsewhere, that this magazine exists. They 

have indeed shown themselves friends of Our College and of " Our Col- 
lege Times." 

Therefore, we justly and fairly may ask you, when about to buy any- 
thing, to consider first those who by their advertising have made this maga- 
zine possible- 

We have solicited only advertisers who are reliable in all respects- 



READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS 



BUSINESS MANAGER OF "OTTR COIXB6E TIMES' 



The Pillars of the Nation 



H. H. Nye, '12 



ON visiting one of our large 
cities, we stop awestruck amid 
the noisy crowd and gaze in 
wonder upon some of the large build 
ings there. We think how men dug 
deep into the earth and laid the 
foundations upon the solid rock. 
Lifting our eyes, Ave see the stupen- 
dous walls towering high in the air. 
There are the mighty pillars support- 
ing the great weight above them. 
They are firmly set upon the solid 
foundation. The skillful hand of the 
artist has fashioned and strengthened 
them that they may withstand the 
storms for many years. 

There are other structures more 
complex in organization, more signi- 
ficant in purpose, more wonderful in 
architecture. They are the nations of 
the earth — social structures more sig- 
nificant than those marble walls which 
will finally crumble to ruin and 
moulder in dust away. 

Three centuries ago our persecuted 
fathers gathered on American soil 
and unconsciously began to lay the 
foundations of a new nation destined 
to become the greatest nation on the 
globe. Here, like Nehemiah of old, 
amid the fiery darts of the Red Man 
and other oppressors, these settlers 
persistently followed their industrial 
pursuits and framed their laws on the 
principles of Liberty, Equality and 
Fraternity in government and religi- 
on, — all of which found expression in 
the charters of the different colonies. 



and tonally in the Great Declaration of 
Independence. These men labored to 
build up our institutions that make 
present life and thought possible, and 
we as their posterity are enjoying the 
rich fruitage of their labors. They 
have been the staunch and sturdy pil- 
lars that have supported this national 
structure which today towers above 
all other nations. They and their fol- 
lowers have struggled under the ban- 
ner of perseverance and have made 
this twentieth century the golden age 
of modern civilization. If this nation 
is to continue its development and 
hold its place among the nations, its 
supporting pillars must stand immov- 
able on the principles of virtue, peace, 
justice, and righteousness. 

One by one these pillars fall and 
sometimes are struck down by the 
cruel hand of a Booth, a Guitteau or a 
Czolgosz. Their places must be filled 
by others of equal or superior qualifi- 
cations. To what source must we 
look for our reserve supply? It must 
come from our three great institu- 
tions, — the home, the school, and the 
church. These three are engaged in 
the noble enterprise of rearing men 
and women for the performance of 
duties which the upward march of hu- 
manity imposes upon them. 

The home stands for the perpetua- 
tion of the race, and for the develop- 
ment of the potentialities of manhood 
and womanhood lying dormant in the 
breast of every infant that graces its 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



sacred altar. The hand of the mother 
holds the scepter of national power. 
Unto her, the righteous Creator en- 
trusts the care and instruction of the 
little ones who shall some day become 
the pillars of the nation. It is of ut- 
most importance that the child receive 
the best training in its tender years, 
for first impressions are the most last- 
ing, and good seed sown into the plas- 
tic mind will finally ripen into true 
manhood. 

The fundamental purpose of the 
home from an educational and moral 
standpoint is teaching obedience. This 
virtue implanted in every heart, is 
the greatest contribution which the 
home can make to civilization. How 
many of our homes fail in their pur- 
pose ! Disobedient children demand 
certain conditions, and instead of 
yielding to the parents wishes, they 
trample underfoot their kind advice. 
This is rearing men and women for 
anarchism. In many cases the sancti- 
ty of the home is lost; too few men 
and women can turn to the most hal- 
lowed spot on earth where the tender 
hand of an angel mother guided their 
infant footsteps in holy nurture. Shall 
we allow this basic unit of civilization, 
this heart of society out of which are 
the issues of the life of the nation, to 
become nurseries of ignorance, infi- 
delity, and crime, instead of holy, sa- 
cred, progenitors of the race? Unless 
there be radical reforms made, the 
state will be obliged to legislate in 
favor of such conditions as shall 
guarantee ideal citizenship, and pro- 
longed existence of the nation. In pro- 
portion as the home fulfils its mission, 
the child can perform its duties in the 



school and church, and finally serve 
as a pillar of the nation. 

The school stands for the intellectu- 
al development of the child and the in- 
crease of culture. It exemplifies the 
gospel of salvation by education. It 
is founded upon the passion of making 
the world better for each generation. 
All history has been a march toward 
the goal of perfect schools. Because 
of the belief that "of such is the king- 
dom of heaven" parents love to spend 
money and time for the education of 
their children. Every nation is to be- 
come a perfect society. Education 
must show to each individual the par- 
ticular sphere of activity for which he 
is best fitted. In a nation like ours 
whose government is in the hands of 
the people we must all work for the 
general good. The spirit of the nation 
is the spirit of humanity and the spirit 
of humanity is brotherly love. A na- 
tion, like every good man, is moved by 
its heart. 

Heart-culture is the function of the 
church, which must wield its influence 
in the child's development. Her duty 
is to instil righteousness into the 
heart of ever}^ American citizen, to 
sanctify human life, and exalt human 
character. All through the ages the 
Church has been the great conserva- 
tive and unifying force that has aimed 
to concentrate the efforts of all the 
social institutions for the realization 
of its supreme ideal — a well-rounded 
spiritual development of humanity. It 
is the Christian religion that must 
permeate and underlie all institutions 
and give them immortal significance. 
The Church aims at the transforma- 
tion of the earth into the kingdom of 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



heaven, winning man's attention from 
the lowly things of this life to the 
glorious things of his Creator. But 
men are so prone to disobey her teach- 
ings. In the commercial and indust- 
rial worlds of today, men do not ob- 
serve the Golden Rule and the prin- 
ciples of the Sermon on the Mount; 
but they try to ease their consciences 
by obeying simply the petty require- 
ments of the law. How far we have 
fallen from the teachings of the Great 
Master! How false, hypocritical, and 
damnable the effects will be if we do 
not fill our public offices with whole- 
souled, highly-cultured, religious men 
and women; men who will stand firm 
as a rock on the principles of right as 
laid down by the Supreme Law-Giver ; 
men who will take a stand in the thick 



of the battle against intemperance, 
immorality and political corruption ! 

These three institutions — the home 
with its devoted parents as the expon- 
ents of obedience, friendship, and af- 
fection ; the school with its band of al- 
truistic teachers, as the exponents of 
intellectual culture ; the church with 
its army of loyal and consecrated 
workers, as the exponents of right- 
eousness — all these must contribute 
their best in the onward march toward 
the goal of national perfection. If 
this great national structure shall 
endure, we must found our thrones 
and altars on the bodies and souls of 
living men ; and as the great curtain 
of the future is gradually drawn aside, 
we shall enter a millenium of human 
righteousness. 



The True Object of Education 



By H. Frank Eshleman, Esq., of Lancaster. 



THE great object of education 
is culture. There is only one 
greater purpose in all human 
life, and that is the salvation of man's 
soul. Culture is the great purpose of 
education. How simple seems that 
thing, and yet true education is of all 
the professions the most difficult, the 
most intricate, the most profound! 
Education is most intricate and most 



profound because true education, 
true wisdom, must constantly be dis- 
tinguished, disentangled and separat- 
ed from foolish nonsense. It is a task 
so difficult that thousands of teachers 
give it up in disgust, and hundreds of 
thousands never attempt it at all. The 
true aim of education is the making of 
a strong, large, healthy, active mind. 
I emphatically contend that the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



first great purpose in education is to 
make a man or a woman rather than a 
scholar; and if both of these ends can- 
not be attained in the process of edu- 
cation, then I confidentially affirm 
that the first great purpose of educa- 
tion is to make the man, and not the 
scholar. Manhood is more needed 
than simple scholarship in our world 
today. The boy and girl going 
through school are not to be prepared 
primarily for a profession, but for 
life — great, active, energetic, every 
day life. It seems today that in many 
instances it would be far better if part 
of the time were devoted to the instill- 
ing into the pupil the great principle 
of beauty, duty, honesty, purity, mo- 
rality, justice, faith, right and wrong, 
and moral law. Generally, all the 
time put upon book study for the boj 
going through school is to meet life ; 
and the boy or girl who is strong in 
scholarship and weak in manhood or 
womanhood is of no particular advan- 
tage to the community at all. We hug 
the delusion that the people are pay- 
ing their school taxes so that the boys 
and girls may be filled with Greek, 
Grammar, Algebra, History, etc. But 
what the parents and state are moral- 
ly interested in is that these studies 
should be used to develop the morali- 
ty of the man and woman. Moral 
fibre, honesty, faith, justice, belief in 
high nobility of mind, unselfishness 
and loyalty ; this is true teaching, and 
the boy who gets these elements out 
of school has a great deal more than 
the brilliant boy who never missed 
a lesson, but who cannot be trusted 
with a moral purpose and who is not 
honest. 



The great purpose of school is to 
prepare boys and girls to be men and 
women who can first live. The great 
business of the school is to prepare us 
for life, and the great question of life 
is life. The greatest question is not 
of money-making, fame, physical 
strength, health, mere happiness, har- 
mony, but it is life and death, great, 
active, glorious life, glorious death. 
These two taken together spell SUC- 
CESS. 

Brave men are needed far more to- 
day than brilliant men. The world 
has more scholars than it needs, but 
not half enough brave men. There- 
fore, I hold that the schools ought to 
teach moral manhood and back-bone 
as well as mathematics, godliness as 
well as grammar, honesty as well as 
history, and godliness as well as geo- 
graphy. In the schools of our fore- 
fathers the Bible itself was used as 
one of the textbooks; it is only lately 
we have become so brilliant that we 
discovered that teaching the boys and 
girls of the Saviour is opposed to be- 
coming brilliant. They simply re- 
member that it was our Christian 
forefathers that worshiped Him. They 
remember that the Creator has done 
more for this country than all laws 
ever devised. But we have turned 
coward and in compliance with the 
request of the Jews in New York who 
do not believe in the gospel, New 
York City backed down and gave up 
singing the Christmas carols on ac- 
count of that element. The Bible 
made men of our grandfathers and 
forefathers. Who could not put them 
in a bank as a teller and never fear 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



they would embezzle the funds and go 
off to Canada? 

We could lose 50 per cent, of our 
brilliant men, but God forbid that we 
should lose one of our brave men. 

The immensity of the field is ap- 



palling. There is no lack of jobs. 
There are more $5000 jobs today than 
there are $5000 men to fill them. If 
you can't get a $5000 job you are not 
the $5000 man. 



-1 



Commencement Week 



The first feature of Commencement 
Week for 1912 was the Baccalaureate 
Sermon delivered on Sunday evening, 
June 9, by Eld. J. G. Royer, ex-presi- 
dent of Mount Morris College, Illinois. 
A large audience greeted the speaker. 
The graduates, seventeen in number, 
marched to the chapel in a body and 
occupied reserved seats near the plat- 
form. 

Elder Royer took his text from 2 
Tim. 2:15, "Study to show thyself 
approved unto God, a workman that 
needeth not to be ashamed, rightly 
dividing the word of truth." 

His remarks in part were as follows : 
"The word baccalaureate relates to 
the degree of Bachlor of Arts or is 
known as a farewell sermon to 
graduates. 

The object of school going is not so 
much to get knowledge, but to learn 
to know where knowledge is, and how 
to get it. Some parents think it 
costs too much to send children to 
college. It isn't money spent, it is 
money invested. My theme this even- 
ing is "Life at Its Best." 

I understand this thing of living is 
an unfolding, a growth, progress, 



e very V. here. There are three stages 
of life — (1) before birth, (2) between 
birth and death, and (3) the life be- 
yond. The second stage has five 
periods, viz., infancy, childhood, man- 
hood, middle age, and old age. If we 
want to develop and make a success of 
life we must live out each period well. 
God thought enough of each of our 
lives to plan it. I like the thought of 
life as a hymn of praise. Emerson 
says, "He who would be a great soul 
in the future must be a great soul 
now." 

In every living thing is growth, 
whether it be straight or crooked. 
Dead things cannot grow. What to 
grow? Develop Christian graces. 
When born again we are babes in 
Christ and should grow like a babe, 
steadily, growing a little each day. 
We should school ourselves to be a 
blessing to other people, that is life at 
its best. 

A man or woman away from Christ 
is dead in sin and cannot grow. It is 
very important to have a good start. 
I don't care how little life you have 
just so there is life, then one may 
grow. First thing to do is to cease to 



OUR COLLE'GE TIMES 



a 



do evil and flee youthful lusts. Learn 
to do well — never be satisfied with 
present attainments, but keep your- 
selves constantly under the influence 
of Christ's power. 

The best picture of Life at its Best 
is the scene of Christ on the cross. 
Life at its best means service to man- 
kind. 



Piano Soli, Largo, (Handel), Valse 
Sieveking), Carrie Dennis; Vocal So. 
lo, O For the Wings of a Dove, (Men- 
delssohn), Schlafliedchen, (Herman), 
Elizabeth Kline; Girls' Chorus, Spin- 
ning Song. (Wagner) ; Piano Quartet, 
Fest-Overture. (Leutner), Misses 
Sheaffer, Dennis, Kline, Shank. 



MUSIC PROGRAM 

The weather was ideal pn Monday 
evening, and a large audience gathered 
in Music Hall to hear the annual Mus- 
ic program. Every number on the 
program was well rendered. Different 
performers were encored. The Flow- 
er Songs by little Fanny Heisey and 
the German song by Miss Elizabeth 
Kline were especially pleasing. 

Following is the entire program : — 
Piano Trio, Fruhlings, Marsch, 
(Tutschek), Misses Dennis, Shank 
Lehman ; Ladies' Chorus, Merry June, 
(Vincent); Piano SoH, Danse Bohe- 
mian, (Geibel), Sailor Boy's Dream, 
(De Lache), Delia Shank; Vocal 
Duet, Dreams of Gladness, (Moir), 
Misses Miller and Kline ; Piano Quar- 
tet, Rosamunde, Overture, (Schubert- 
Jansen), Misses Sheaffer, Dennis, 
Kline, Shank; Flower Songs, Clover 
Blossoms, (Senour), Pansy, (Senour), 
Fanny Heisey; Vocal Solo, Gypsy 
Love Song, (Herbert), C. L. Martin; 
Chorus, The Nightingale and the 
Rose, (Lehnert) ; Piano Trio, Girard 
Gavotte, (Fondey), Misses Dennis, 
Lehman, Shank; Vocal Solo, The Day 
is Done, (Balfe), Katherine Miller. 
Piano Soli, Hungarian Rhapsody No. 
2, (Liszt), Misses Sheaffer and Kline; 



COMMERCIAL PROGRAM 

On Tuesday evening many friends 
of the graduates of the Commercial 
department gathered to witness their 
exercises. The rostrum was beautiful- 
ly decorated with potted plants and 
the class colors. The following pro- 
gram was well rendered : — 

Invocation, Prof. H. K. Ober; Mu- 
sic, Ladies' Quartet: Oration, "Co- 
operation", Russell W. Shank; Ora- 
tion, "The Better Way", Paul M. 
Landis; Music, Male Quartet; Ora- 
tion, "The Oil of Business Machin- 
ery", Fred. L. Burgess; Oration, "The 
Pivotal Point", Ava R. Witmer; Mu- 
sic. Ladies' Quartet; Address, H. 
Frank Eshleman, Esq., Lancaster; 
Music, Quartet. 



CLASS DAY 

CLASS Day exercises are gen- 
erally looked upon with great 
interest, and were enjoyed as 
usual by a large audience that gather- 
ed on Wednesday afternoon to hear 
them. The class colors were Blue and 
Gold, the class flower, Sweet Pea, and 
the class motto "Loyalty." Near the 
close of the program the class present- 
ed to the College Library, twenty vol- 
umes of poems, (Aster Edition) writ- 



14 



OUR colleg;e times 



ten by English and American authors. 
The full program was as follows: — 

Music; Address, Pres. W. F. Eshle- 
man ; History, W. F. Christman ; 
Poem, C. L. Martin; Music; Grumb- 
ler, O. Z.Becker; Optimist, W. K. 
Kulp; Oration, R. C. Long; Pre- 
sentation of Memorial, Miss Mamie 
Keller; Prophecy, Irene Scheetz; 
Class Song. 



CLASS SONG 

Ah! joys beyond describing! 

Our tasks are done and past; 
There's no more use in trying. 

We've learned it all at last. 

Chorus 

So we'll sing our parting story 
To the ones we loved while here 

And may he who reigns in glory 
Keep watch o'er E'town dear. 

A class with more good graces, 
A group with thoughts more keen, 

A happier lot of faces. 
Has "College" never seen. 

But yet a cloud of sorrow 
Comes o'er us with a start 

On thinking of the morrow 
That then we all must part. 

Farewell to our old schoolmates, 
Farewell to ones so dear, 

Farewell with many heartaches. 
Farewell to the passing year. 

Loyalty will be our watchword, 

To it we've pledged to be true. 
Under the Loyal Banner, 
The flag of Gold and Blue. 



ALUMNI PROGRAM 

The following program was given 
on Wednesday evening: — (For fur- 
ther particulars see Alumni Notes on 
another plage of this issue.) 

Prayer, G. H. Light, Hatfield, Pa. ; 
Duet, "Land of the Swallows" Quar- 
tet Accompaniment; Oration, Samuel 
G. Meyers, '10, Fredericksburg, Pa. ; 
Ladies' Quartet, "My Old Kentucky 
Home"; Recitation. "The Weddin," 
Olive A. Myers, '10, Sylvan, Pa.; 
A-Iixed Octet, "Sailing"; Address, 
Chas. E. Shoop, '05, Dayton, Ohio; 
Ladies' Quartet, "Twilight." 



COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 

THE weather on Commence- 
ment Day added much to 
the pleasure of the occasion. 
Promptly at nine o'clock in the morn- 
ing the Trustees, Faculty and Gradu- 
ates marched into the Chapel and took 
the seats reserved for them. As they 
marched, a chorus of many voices 
sang "Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God 
Almighty." 

The class of 1912 represented six 
different courses as follows : — 

College Preparatory : — Walter F. 
Eshleman, Wm. F. Christman ; Peda- 
gogical Course : — Mamie B. Keller, 
Harry H. Nye ; English Scientific 
Course : — Orpha L. Harshberger, Ger- 
trude Miller, M. Irene Sheetz, Orville 
Z. Becker, C. L. Martin ; Commercial 
Course : — Gertrude A. Keller, Ava R. 
Witmer, Fred Lawrence Burgess. 
Russell W. Shank, Isaac O. Foreman, 
Paul M. Landis, Roy Condry Long; 
English Bible Course:— Wm. K. 
Kulp; Sewing Course: — Naomi K. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



Enterline, Mamie W. Ginder, Lizzie 
B. Gingrich, Mabel L. Heisey, Ada L. 
Hess, Bertha M. Hollinger, Martha 
Martin, Kathryn E. Myers, E. Besse 
Wright. 

Rev. J. H. Keller from Shrewsbury, 
made the opening prayer. A chorus 
then sang, "Lord, We Beseech Thee." 
W. F. Eshleman of Elizabethtown in- 
troduced his oration "The Unfolding 
Life," with the following words of 
welcome : — 

"As the threshold of life opens to 
us this Commencement morn, we gaze 
through the dim portal into the vast 
and boundless unknown. We are 
filled with hope and joy for the future, 
and that our joy may be more full our 
friends have come to rejoice with us. 
It seems but a short time since you 
were welcomed to a similar occasion, 
and ere long the cycle of time will 
have completed another revolution. 

We welcome our friends who share 
the pleasure of this day with us. We 
thank you for coming to witness our 
triumph and trust you may leave 
amply rewarded for your presence. 

We welcome our faithful trustees 
who had to cope with serious prob- 
lems during the past year. You have 
provided so excellently for our intel- 
lectual development, and now to show 
your continued interest in us you 
have come to honor us with your 
{)resence. 

We extend the hand of welcome to 
our fellow students who have rejoiced 
and sympathized with us. Many 
pleasant memories are ours now, and 
in the years to come we shall look 
back to our Alma Mater and remem- 
ber you as students of this institution. 



With affectionate remembrance do 
we greet our respected teachers. You 
have urged us forward. We realize 
that we have reached this goal not 
through ourselves alone, but through 
your untiring eiTorts. May our fu- 
ture lives be a remuneration for your 
toil. 

And now again to our friends, to the 
trustees, to our fellow students, to our 
devoted teachers, the class of 1912 bid 
you all a hearty welcome to their 
Commencement Exercises. 

The order of exercises then were as 
follows : — 

"In the Early Morning," Orpha 
Harshberger; "Why be a Mission- 
ary?" Wm. K. Kulp; Quartet "Annie 
Laurie"; "Visions," Gertrude Miller; 
"The Unwritten Law," Wm. F. 
Christman ; "The Blessing of Labor," 
M. Irene Sheetz ; Quintet, "The Last 
Rose of Summer"; "A Plea for the 
Boy," Christian L. Martin ; "Woman 
Suffrage," Mamie B. Keller; Ladies' 
Chorus, "Lift Thine Eyes to the 
Mountains" ; "The Wealth of Happi- 
ness;" Orville Z. Becker; "The Pil- 
lars of the Nation," Harry H. Nye; 
Chorus, "As the Mountains are Round 
About Jerusalem" ; Presentation of 
Diplomas, Pres. D. C. Reber; Class 
Song. 



Closing Words of H. H. Nye 

We have arrived at the time that 
marks the close of our schooldays. 
We startle at the thought that our re- 
cords are sealed, that our courses here 
are finished, and that we must now 
speak the parting word. 

Worthy trustees we are grateful for 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the privilege of graduating from an in- 
stitution that stands firm on the prin- 
ciples of true education. You are the 
venerable pillars that have supported 
this institution and have guided it 
through the days of its childhood. 
You are erecting a monument more 
lasting than marble, and more precious 
than gold and silver can buy. May 
God prosper this worthy cause, and 
may you continue your noble eflforts 
until this institution may radiate its 
righteous influence to the ends of the 
earth. As your afifectionate sons and 
daughters we bid you farewell. 

Fellow students, the ties which have 
united us in a school family must now 
be severed. We trust that our as- 
sociations have been mutually helpful. 
We shall ever cherish fond memories 
of you. Continue your worthy under- 
takings and never despair until you 
have realized your aim. To all a 
ivvarm farewell. 

Members of the Faculty, we express 
our sincerest appreciation of your un- 
tiring efforts in giving us a clear and 
larger vision of life and more culture 
of the soul. You have directed our re- 
search in the archives of knowledge, 
lighted our path toward the goal of 
truth, and filled us with high aspir- 
ations and hopes for the future. And 
now as we wend our way over the 
thorny pathway of life, may your 
prayers ever attend us. We bid you 
farewell. 

Our worthy president, to you we 
must also speak the parting word. 
You have so planned our courses of 
study that we have eagerly followed 
them from start to finish. You have 
set in motion the vibrations of our 



heart strings that shall continue vi- 
brating until time shall be no more. 
May our Heavenly Father so aid you 
in piloting our Alma Mater that she 
may excultingly triumph over all per- 
ils and difficulties, Farewell. 

Classmates, we too must part, for 
various fields of duty call us else- 
where. We rejoice this day in having 
realized our aims, but let us ever re- 
member that with the increase of op- 
portunities comes the greater responsi- 
bility. Let us go forth from these 
walls with invincible courage, wield- 
ing the sword of righteousness and 
ever moving upward and onward. 
Let us all remain faithful to the 
Master until wc gather in a final re- 
union around the great white throne in 
glory, where eternal bliss shall be our 
reward. Wc bid vou all a fond fare- 



LIFE'S BEST INVESTMENT 
Pres. Reber's Address to the Gradu- 
ates 

Every individual has bestowed upon 
him a mission and the means with 
which to achieve it. Every one is en- 
dowed by nature and ancestry with 
talents that arc to be used in the ful- 
filment of life's purpose. These en- 
dowments are the capital with which 
to start upon life. 

What forms does this capital as- 
sume? First, there is one's ancestral 
heritage. This may be in the form of 
money, titles to vast estates, stocks, 
bonds, etc, or it may be a pious, ed- 
ucated thrifty, and healthy ancestry. 
Pennsylvanians have for the most part 
German blood coursing through their 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



veins, and are descended from a people 
that have five hundred years of splen- 
did record of character and achieve- 
ment back of them. An educated 
ancestry is a noble and valuable heri- 
tage with which to start upon life's 
quest. The class of 1912 of Elizabeth- 
town College has therefore a rich en- 
dowment in this respect. 

Second, a healthy physique is an- 
other form of inherited capital. This 
is next to blood the individual's great- 
est asset. Third there is the mental 
endowment. This is to some extent 
hereditary. Yet it admits of great im- 
provement. With this goes the oppor- 
tunities to develop and train the mind 
under the inspiration and guidance 
of a lofty purpose during the format- 
ive period of life. Many young people 
not realizing the value of the golden 
opportunities youth affords have wast- 
ed many years in aimless living, fool- 
ishly following some youthful whim. 
Youth is characterized by noble aspi- 
pirations which should crystallize into 
a definite aim that is worthy of man's 
pursuit. Only things that are worth 
while should engage the attention of 
young men and women. 

Lastly, there is the spiritual endow- 
ment. This consists of a moral and 
spiritual capabilty which too must be 
developed under careful nurture. At 
birth this exists only as a germ. 
When developed under Christian in- 
fluene^es this develops into a chri.stian 
character whose elements are a certain 
amount of scholarship, a considerable 
amount of culture, and a completely 
fashioned and well disciplined will. 

To invest is to lay out money or 
capital in the purchase of property for 



permanent use and must not be con- 
fused with the terms speculate or 
spend. Speculation aims to get money 
or property for which no full equiva- 
lent is to be given. Spending is using 
money or gifts without getting ade- 
quate returns therefrom. Using money 
to secure a true education is investing 
it and not spending it. 

To invest then is to conserve. Con- 
servation is a watchword of progress 
in the twentieth century. Our nation- 
al resources such as minerals, forests, 
and children must not be wasted and 
squandered. They must be properly 
utilized, invested and conserved. Re- 
cently there was held at South Bethle- 
hem, Pa., a medical congress in the in- 
terest of the conservation of our chil- 
dren. If we would have strong men 
as pillars of the nation, we must see to 
it that our youth are properly educat- 
ed, and thus become qualified to as- 
sume the duties and responsibilities of 
life. 

Investments may be classed as fol- 
lows : Investments of inherited wealth 
for self, investments of acquired 
wealth for self, investments of self for 
self and lastly, investments of self for 
the sake of others. Which form of in- 
vestment will the members of the 
class of 1912 select to invest their de- 
veloped powers? The first class of in- 
vestments is represented by the mil- 
lionaire's son. This is not available 
for any in this graduating class. Per- 
sons for whom the second form of in- 
vestment is open are comparatively 
few. Carnegie and Rockefeller are 
instances. There can be no intelligent 
investment of the second class without 
an extensive education in financiering. 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



More numerous are the people who 
select the third form of investment. 
In this class are all those who seek an 
education as a means to honor and 
fame. But time will prove sooner or 
later that it was not the best kind of 
an investment. 

The best kind of investment is to in- 
vest one's self in the service of hu- 
manity. To this end, a proper kind of 
education is also necessary. This kind 
of investment must insure a living. It 
is estimated that a school boy's time 
is worth ten dollars a day. But this is 
incidental and secondary. Foremost 
and uppermost is the good and highest 
interest of others. There are a num- 
ber of vocations in which one may de- 
vote his Ife in service to others. These 
centre around the home, the school, 
the state, and the church. Home-mak- 
ing is a laudable ambition for every 



one. Any one rearing a family is 
devoting a large part of self for the 
good of others. Again, any form of 
educational work such as teaching, 
lecturing, etc., is an investment of self 
for others. The Christian citizen and 
the social reformer are investing their 
God-given talents for the betterment 
of mankind. Lastly, the Christian 
rninistry, the work of the missionary 
and benevolent societies are probably 
the. highest and best forms of invest- 
ing one's powers for the glory of God. 
In conclusion, let me remind you of 
your responsibility in choosing your 
life work. You will be called to give 
an account of the way you have used 
your talents. Choose the best invest- 
ment for your life and when summon- 
ed to the Judge of all the earth, may 
you hear his unqualified approval, 
"Well done ! Enter into the joys of 
Thv Lord." 



Pluck and Luck 

"One constant element of luck 

Is gnuine, solid old Teutonic pluck. 

Stick to your aim, the mongrel's hold 

will slip ; 
But only crowbars loose the bulldog's 

grip- 
Small though he looks, the jaw that 

never yields, 
Drags down the bellowing monarch of 

the fields,"— O. W. Holmes. 



At the close of a Missionary Pro- 
gram rendered in the College Chapel 
on Sunday evening, May 19, Rev. Hi- 
ram Kaylor of Green Tree congrega- 
tion, delivered a missionary sermon. 
We were pleased to have Bro. Kaylor 
with us, and hope he will come soon 
again. 

If interested in collego work write for 
catalogue to Dr. D. C. Rcl>er. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 




WITH this issue of our College 
Times, we, the editor-in-chief, 
lay down the editor's pen, 
"which according to the change in man- 
agement will be taken up in the Fall 
"by Prof. R. W. Schlosser. 

We have been associated with the 
paper from ihe time of its first issue, 
May, 1904, until today, having served 
as associate-editor up to July, 1907, 
when the duties of editor-in-chief- 
were laid upon us. These years have 
been fraught with joys, cares, and 
trials, which only an editor can ap- 
preciate. We are very grateful to all 
those who have so nobly lent us their 
assistance and encouragement in 
making our paper what it has been 
and now is. 

Remember that the services you so 
kindly lent have not been for the edi- 
tor's sake, but for the best interest of 
Elizabethtown College. 

To the incoming editor and his stafif 
of co-laborers, we tender our best 
wishes for success in your new field of 
activity. 

Long live Our College Times! May 
it always foster the principles of true 
education as set forth in its first issue, 
May— 1904. 



.Commencemeit week is over. An- 
other school year has closed. Fond 
farewells were spoken. Piles of 
trunks and suit-cases have dissap- 
peared. College doors have closed. 
To all we extend our best wishes for a 
restful and pleasant vacation. 

Many of our former students expect 
to return in the Fall, and there are 
prospects for many new ones. 

Have you seen our new Catalogue? 
If not, a postal card with your address 
an J request upon it, will bring you a 
c-.py. 

The Election for Trustees held on 
Commencement Day resulted as fol- 
lows ; Edw. Wenger, Fredericksburg, 
Pa., Benj. Hottel. Richland Centre, 
Pa. ; A. G. Longenecker, Elizabeth- 
town, Pa. These were re-elected for a 
term of three years. 

The Faculty 

The new catalogue announces very 
few changes in the faculty. 

The name of Elizabeth Kline did not 
appear in last year's catalogue because 
of her not being employed until the 
opening of the Winter Term. She is 
catalogued to teach vocal and Instru- 
mental Music and Orthography. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Miss Carrie Dennis will also assist 
in the Music Department. 

Laban W. Leiter, B. E. will con- 
tinue his College Course and assist in 
teaching Latin. He will also serve in 
the capacity of hall teacher on Mem- 
orial Hall. 

Harry H. Nye. B. Pd. will teach U. 
S. and General History, and pursue the 
Classical Course. 

Isaac J. Kreider, who is a graduate 
of Millersville State Normal School 
will teach Political Geography and the 
gentlemen's classes in Physical Cul- 
ture. He will also continue his work 
in the Classical Course. 

(^n Monday, June 3, W. K. Gish and 
his bride started for Alberta, Canada, 
where they will reside on their broad 
and peaceful acres. 

Annual Metting 

College Work was suspended on 
June 3 and 4. Nearly all the College 
folk.-, teachers, students, janitor, and 
cooks and their assistants snc it from 
one to four days at the Conference. 

Since the city of York is only about 
eighteen miles from Elizabethtown, 
many were the College friends 
who gathered there. Two of the first 
six students who enrolled for College 
work on November 13, 1900 were 
present ; namely, Rufus Bucher and 
Kurvin Henry. Both are married and 
are engaged at farming. Carrie Neff 
whose mother and sister Anna 



(deceased) lived at the College for 
several years, 1902-3, introduced us to^ 
her husband and two children. 

The greetings of friends were too 
many to mention all by name ; but let 
it suffice to say, we were indeed glad 
to greet you all once again. 

College Reunion 

The most largely attended and most 
interesting reunion ever held, occurred 
on Monday, June 3, from 12 to 1 P. 
M. in the tabernacle. Many students 
teachers, and trustees gathered on the 
platform and joined their voices in 
singing "All Hail the Power of Jesus 
Name," after which Eld. S. R. Zug of- 
fered the opening prayer. Dr. Reber 
the chairman, then welcomed the 
friends of the College to the reunion. 
Addresses were made by Eld Jesse 
Ziegler. Prof. H. K. Ober, G. N. Falk- 
enstein, Rufus Bucher, R. W. Schlos- 
ser and J. G. Meyer. A ladies' quartet, 
Kathryn Miller, Leah M. Sheaffer, 
Elizabth Kline, and Nora Reber sang 
"Annie Laurie" and a ladies' chorus 
sang "Lift Thine Eyes to the Moun- 
tain." 

.\mong former teachers of the 
College who attended this conference 
were G. N. Falkenstein, Mrs. G. N. 
Falkenstein, I. N. H. Beahm. B. F. 
Wampler, Mrs. B. F. Wampler, Ed- 
ward C. Bixler, Margaret Haas Sch- 
wenk. W. H. Sanger. Clayton F. 
Weaver, T. H. Keller. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




Youmo^tSup' 



Some of the persons who visited 
friends at the College before and after 
the Annual Conference at York and 
during Commenoement week were: — 
Elder David Hollinger and wife, 
Greenville, Ohio ; Elder J. H. Longen- 
ecker. Palmyra, Pa., Rev. Howard W. 
Cover, with his mother and niece, Co- 
lumbia, Pa., Elder J. G. Royer and 
wife and their daughters, Josephine 
and Mary, Mt. Morris, 111., Wm. M. 
Howe and wife, Johnstown; Mr. and 
Mrs. Shelly, Blair county, Pa., Mr. 
and Mrs. W. H. Holsinger, Miss 
Elizabeth Shirk, who has been con- 
nected with Mission work in Chicago. 

Our crop of strawberries matured 
beautifully and graced the tables in 
the College dining-room almost daily 
at supper time. The students were 
much pleased to have Prof. Ober an- 
nounce in Chapel one morning that a 
certain section of the strawberry patch 
was open gratis to students and 
teachers. Of course, we enjoyed the 
berries. The supply was greater than 
the College could use, hence many 
quarts were sold to friends in Eliza- 
bethtown and vicinity. 

The final examination for graduates 
in the Pedagogical department was 
held Wednesday, May 29. 



Seniors' work closed on June 7th, 
thus allowing them the remainder of 
the term for preparation for Class Day" 
and Commencement. 



KEYSTONE NOTES 

"Of all sad words of tongue or pen,, 
the saddest are, "Good times have 
been." 

We now have given the parting 
hand to school mates. Many have 
gone, not to return to their Alma 
Mater next fall, but to take an active 
part in the world's activities. Not a. 
few of our active members expect to- 
teach. We wish them much success. 

On Friday evening. May 17, the K. 
L. S. met in regular literary session. 
After the inauguration of the new 
officers and the president's address en- 
titled "Perseverance" the following 
humorous program was rendered: — 
The Idle Hour. Recitation, (dialect) 
Gertrude Newcomer ; Soliloquy, Gert- 
rude Miller; Personal Experience, 
Bessie Wright; Discussion, Virgil 
Holsinger ; Fragments of Fun, Rhoda 
Miller; Fable. Walter Eshleman; 
Lullaby, (Instrumental), Carrie Den- 
nis ; Bits of Irish Humor, Collected 
by Harry Longenecker and read hy 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Howard Merkey; Riddles, George 
Neff; Story, Hiram Eberly; Literary 
Echo, Rebekah Sheaffer. 

The last meeting of the year was 
held May 24. The program was short 
and spicy, and was rendered before an 
appreciative audience. The chief 
feature was the Debate — Resolved, 
"That Roosevelt should be elected 
president." Affirmative speakers were 
George Nefif and Calvin Rose; Nega- 
tive speakers, Edgar Diehm and Har- 
ry Nye. 

College vs. Alumni 

On June 13, the College team de- 
feated the Alumni of the school by a 
score of IS to 7. Through the heavy 
hitting of College Team and ragged 
fielding of the Alumni it was an easy 
victory. 



COLLEGE 

Rose, 2b. 
Burgess, p. 
Christman, c. 
Kulp, lb. 
Shank, ss. 
Herr, 3b. 
Kreider, cf. 
Foreman, rf. 
Reber, If. 



ALUMNI 

Nefif, c. 
Grofif, 3b. , 
Schlosser, p. 
Herr 2b. 
Longenecker, 
Leiter, ss. 
Diehm, rf. 
Nye, cf. 
Reber, If. 



Our students who contemplate 
teaching in the public schools have 
met with good success in securing 
schools, regarding the number of ap- 
pilicants in the county. Those to whom 
schools have been entrusted are: 
Irene Sheetz, who will teach the 
Chiques school ; Nora Reber, Rock- 
ville; Clayton Fry, Fairview; John 
Eshleman, Cherry Hill; C. Raymond 
Geib, Elm Tree; Howard A. Merkey, 
Chestnut Grove; Harry F. Shank, 
Back Run; Walter Eshleman, Wheat- 
land. There are others who expect to 
teach in their home counties but have 
not yet taken the examinations. To 
all these the "Times" wishes much 
success. 

Marriages 

To economize space in the paper, 
we publish only short notices of the 
following marriages: — 

March 7, 1912— Noah W. Gibble 
and Mabel M. Heagy. 

May 30. 1912— John KraybiU and 
Ella G. Young. 

June 2, 1912— Daniel Brubaker and 
Mary E. Daveler. 

June 6, 1912— Walter Dulebohn and 
Orella Gochnauer. 

To all these newly wedded friends, 
Our College Times extends hearty 
congratulations and best wishes. 



Hits: College 14, Alumni, 5, bases Prof. Ober has resigned his position 

on balls : College 5 ; Alumni 3 ; 3 base as Engineer or Surveyor of E'town 

hits: Kreider 1, Burgess 1, and NefT 1, borough, after serving in this capacity 

2 base hits: Kulp 1, Grofif 1, Herr 1. for nine years. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 




Many members of the Alumni visit- 
ed the school during Commencement 
Week. A few stayed several days. 
But there were many faces missing. 
We would have been glad to see many 
more for the entire week. 

The Alumni supper,' held on Wed- 
nesday evening, June 12, was quite a 
success. The refreshments were fine, 
weather good, interest excellent and 
attendance encouraging. Every one 
seemed to enjoy the occasion. The 
executive committee surely deserves 
much credit for their systematic 
organization of the whole affair. All 
of the classes were represented by one 
or more. 

Those who could not be here for the 
supper came later, in time for the 
evening program. We heard whis- 
pers that it was the best ever given by 
the Association. The speakers all ac- 
quitted themselves nobly and we felt 
highly honored to have them with us. 

Mr. S. G. Meyer, '10, delivered an 
oration entitled "From the Cardie to 
the Grave." Miss Olive Myers, '10, 
gave a very pleasing recitation, "The 



Weddin." Rev. Chas. W. Shoop, 
'05, gave an excellent address from 
life as he termed it. These numbers 
were interspersed with music. 

The Alumni Association met in 
regular business session, immediately 
after the Alumni Luncheon, in the 
College Library. 

The first Vice President, Prof. 
Schlosser, presided. He appointed 
the auditing committee, consisting of 
James Breitigan and B. F. Waltz, to 
examine the Treasurer's report. 

The following officers were elected: 
Pres., Jno. Miller; 1st V. Pres., B. 

F. Waltz; 2nd. V. Pres., L. W. Lei- 

ter; 3rd. V. Pres., W. F. Christman; 

Recording Secretary, Daisy Rider; 

Corresponding Secretary, Irene Wise; 

Executive Com., Leah M. SheafTer, J. 

Z. Herr, C. L. Martin. 

It was decided to appoint a com- 
mittee of five to revise the Alumni 
Constitution, said committee to re- 
port at the next meeting. 

This committee was appointed as 
follows:— R. W. Schlosser, Leah 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Sheaffer, Elizabeth Kline, B. F. 
Waltz, L. W. Leiter. 

The Class of 1912 were received 
and elected as active members of the 
Alumni Association, and several Trus- 
tees and members of the Faculty were 
elected as honorary members of the 
Association. 

A motion was passed stating that 
the money in the treasury be invested 
under the supervision of the College 
Treasurer. 

The Endowment Committee report- 
ed having given one young man a 
scholarship of $100 per year for 
three years. 

The President of the Class of 1912 
was requested to solicit the members 
of the class, for assistance in Endow- 
ment Work, the sum for each being 



the interest on any amount between 
$50 and $300. 

J. G. Meyer, Pres., Gertrude New- 
comer, Sec. pro tern. 

Since the last issue of "Our College 
Times", another of our number has 
joined the rank of the married. Miss 
Ella G. Young, '09, was married to 
Mr. John Kraybill on May 30. Surely 
we extend to these friends our hearti- 
est congratulations and best wishes. 

Prof. Schlosser who took his A. B. 
degree here and at Ursinus College 
last year, has this year received his 
Master's degree at the latter named 
College. We are glad to keep him at 
E'town. 

George H. Light. '07, has recently 
been elected to the ministry in the 
Brethren Church at Hatfield, Pa. 



Thank God Every Morning 

"Thank God every morning when 
when you get up that you have some- 
thing to do that day which must be 
done, whether you like it or not. 
Being forced to work, and forced to do 
your best, will breed in you temper- 
ance and self-control, diligence and 
strength of will, cheerfulness and 
content, and a hundred virtues which 
the idle never know." — Charles Kings- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




li^iiirLZiirziiiizx^^^^^^ 



With this issue of our paper we lay 
aside the duties of Exchange Editor. 
College journalism will be at a stand- 
still for several months. We hope the 
short vacation will be a means of re- 
cuperation, and will furnish abundant 
material for active editorial work. 

During the past year the following 
Exchanges were received: — Albright 
Bulletin, College Life, College Rays, 
College Folio, The Collegian, Col- 
lege Student, Dickinsonian, Dela- 
ware College Review, The Get- 
tysburgian. Friendship Banner, Lin- 
den Hall Echo, Lordsburg College 
Educator, M. H. Aerolith, Juniata 
Echo, The Red Man, Washington Col- 
legian, Red and Black, Purple and 
White, Carlisle Arrow, High School 
Review, Perkiomenite, Owl, Targum, 
Western Maryland College Monthly, 
The Signal, Rays of Light, Mer- 
cury, Philomathean Monthly, Ursinus 
Weekly, Purple and Gold, Tempe 
Normal Student, Normal Quarterly. 

"We have before us at this very 
hour a mighty battle; a struggle in 
which each individual must take part. 



The domain to be fought for is this 
republic — its manhood, its woman- 
hood, its childhood, its institutions. 
But the trophy to be struggled for is 
the stainless flag, the banner of the 
free." — College Rays. 

"Our laboring class is the backbone, 
the sinew and the lifeblood of our na- 
tion, and if American labor, through 
false leadership, falls back into outer 
darkness, our institutions, our laws, 
and our boasted liberty must go topp- 
ling with it. The salvation of this 
country demands the breaking of the 
chains of struggling Labor! The pray- 
er of America is that the call of true 
leadership shall meet with a quick re- 
sponse. When sane and intelligent 
men are placed in leadership. Labor 
will rise, throw off its shackles, and 
burst forth into its God-given right of 
fearless and honest toil ; and those 
glorious principles of Freedom, Equal- 
ity, and Law which gave birth to the 
United States of America will stand 
forth, as they were meant to stand, un- 
soiled, untrammelel and trium- 
phant." — Western Maryland College 
Monthlv. 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Faculty 

D. C. REBER, A. M., Pd. D., President 
Philosophy, Pedagogy, German. 

H. K. OBER, Pd. B., Vice-President. 
Biological Science, Agriculture, 
Surveying. 

ELIZABETH MYER, M. E., 
Reading and Grammar. 

J. G. MEYER, Pd. B., A. B., Secretary, 
Mathematics, Physical Science, 
Greek. 

J. Z. HERR, Prin. Commercial Dept., 
Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Com- 
mercial Law. 

JACOB S. HARLEY, a. B., 

Algebra, German and Civics. 

LYDIA STAUFFER, 
English Bible. 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Pd. B., 
Piano, Orogan, Drawing. 



R. W. SCHLOSSER, Pd. B., A. B., 

English, Latin, French. 
KATIE E. MILLER, 

Director of Vocal Music, Voice 

Culture. 
ELIZABETH KLINE, 

Piano, Voice. 
ANNA W. WOLGEMUTH, 

Shorthand and Typewriting. 
W. K. GISH, Pd. B., 

U. S. History. 
C. E. RESSER, 

Geography, History and Mathe- 
matics. 
LAURA B. HESS, 

Sewing. 
DAISY P. RIDER, Pd. B., 

(Absent on Leave.) 
ELD. S. H. HERTZLER, 

Exegesis (Bible Term.) 



50 N. QUEEN ST. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Cur new and ].-\'Eer store enables us to give vou th- best service possible in the Jewelry business. 
SILVERWAlE of the very best quality at prices most reasonable. 
WATCHES. Our ranze in price is from $150 to $1.00. 
CLOCKS. From $300 chime clocks to the alarm clock at 85 cents 
EYE-GLASSES and SfECIACLES fitted to the eyes with no charge for examination. 
Our Manufacturing and Repairing Department cannot be excelled in Pennsylvania. Everything is 
done in our own shop, by lur own workmen— You are always welccme at Zook's Jewelry SUre. 

D. Walter Miesse 

The College and School Photographer 

INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP 

PORTRAITS 



Bell Telephone 290J 

24 WEST KING STREET, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 27 

lllinBai"jBillllBI{||||iim»l«BI!IIIBIIIIIBllll:B!!|ia'.4Mi|iin 



GEO. R. KERSEY A* 



DENTIST 



BXIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

TOOTH BRUSHES, FLESHi BRUSHES, 
SPONGES, Etc. 

A. W. CAIN 

WE DO IT RIGHT 



College Jawelry of (he Better Sort 

G.WmJREISNER 

Manufacturing 
Jeweler 



Class Pins and Rings 
Fraternity Jewelry 

LANCASTER, PA 

iiiiaiiiiiaiiiiiniiiiBiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiBiiiaiiiiBiiiiiB 



Prize Caps 
Medals 



Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES C^ SON 
A. R. LEICHT 

»« Fine Vehicles 



F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 
GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 



HO RSesHOBING 
North Market Stretl. 



SPBCIALTY 
EL'ZABETH OWN, PA. 



Ripiin'.inj 111 Rniir Work Q iven Careful Attentii 
EUZABETHTOWN, PA. 



J. GROFF & SONS 

Meat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



LEO KOB I 

; Heating and | 

Plumbing I 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. * 

♦♦♦♦■ l"I"H"> - H"l - * - l -- H"l"I"l"l"H"I"l"l -* <"H ' 



«* 



i of good Ice Cream say that 



Miesse's Ice Cream 

is tbe most Delicious and Satisfying 
they have eaten. Try it for yourself 

We serve Parties, Weddings, Dinners 
and Receptions with calces and ice cream 
with perfect satisfaction. 

0. W. MIESSE, 123 N. Queen St., Lancaster 

Our Ice Cream sold in Elizabethlown by J. C. Gross 



FRANK H. KELLER 

Dealer In Fancy and Staple Groceries 
Provisions. Etc. 



UP TO DATE 



Shaving and Hair Cutting 



Our Highest Ambition to Please You. 



R. H. SHISSLER. 



BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 
PHOTO SLTPPUES FOR SALE 
Centre Square 



Clias. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions CareluUy Compounded 



J- 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage 

E. BELSER 



I 



For Roofing, Spouting, Tin ami 
Granite Ware Milk Cans, Radi- 
ators, Portable Furnaces, Granite 
]-isk Roasters in four sizes, or 
any special orders in aiy line. 
Give me a trial. 



First-Class Shoe Rjepairing 

Virork Guaranteed Prices Reasonable 

RUBBER HEELS make WALKING EASY 
JOHN C. BERBERIAN, E. High St. 



^ 0pp. Er.change Bank ^ 

* ELIZABETHTOWN. - PENNA. * 



f ,*«*********** «# ************** 



W. R. Ashenfelter 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddinjjs and I'arties supplied with 
Fancv Cakes at short notice. 



S. MARKET ST., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. JJ 






i H. H. BRAND! t 

t Dealer in X 

♦ ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL ♦ 

♦ SLATE and ROOFING PAPER J 



Elizabeth town, 



♦<!>0<>C <i.OO**»»»»*»****< 



E. L. RENSEL 

General Blucksinjthin^ 
and Repair Work 
Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

Park St., Elizabethtown. Pa 



i lain Suits, Ready-Made or Ordered, at 

ADOLPH GANSMAN'S 

Clothier 

>. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orangs St:., Lancaster. Pa. 
ELIZABETHTOWN 

Dental Par'lor^s 

S. J. HEINDEL, Dentist. 



Touring Car 

$900.00 
RunabontSSOO 




fully Equipped at Above Prices 
Call on or Address 

S. NEWCOMER, 



ELIZABETHTOWN J 

ROLLER MILLS ♦ 

J. p. BIXKLEV, Propr. * 

Manufacturer of Best Grades ol ♦ 
FLOUR AND FEED ♦ 

for ^rain. i 

♦ 



HiKl'est Cash Pric 
hav and 



ELIZABETHTOWN, - I'KXVA 

>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦ 



5 AND lOc STORE 

Let us make your Nickels, Dimes and 
Ijuarters do double duty. .Nothing' in the store 
is priced more than 10c and from Hint down. 
M. W^. ESHENOWER 



ELIZABETHTOWN. 



PENXA. 



John A. Fisher 



BARBER 



Mt. Joy, Pa. Centre Sq. 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



Chas. R. Boggs, Restaurant 



First-Class cTVIeals at All Hours 



O/'Bters In Season 



Confectionery, Ice Cream 



I S. G. HERSHET | 
I X 

t Groceries, Dry ♦ 

♦ Goods and ♦ 

I Notions ♦ 

t ♦ 

4 ElilZABETHTOWN. - PENNA. ♦ 



JACOB FISHER 

Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Center Square, BUzabethtown, Penna. 

With you for ai years. That's All 

E H. LEHMAN \ 
COAL \ 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED, FLOUR. \ 

SEWER PIPE, ETC. ( 

Telephone S 

ElilZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. S 



Bell an<i Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers In 

New and Old Books 

East Orange St., Ijancaster, Pa 

CHOICE MEATS 

A. K. Young 

SUZABETHTOWN, - FBNNA. 



For All Kinds of 
FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & McBride 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PEN 



Ind. Phone Hours 


8 to 6 


DR. JEROME G. HESS wt 


^ 


DENTIST jf 


If 


Hertzler Bldg. 1 1 " 


ill 


Elizabethtown Pa. \| 


IT 1 



Ebersole & Eaney 

Dealers in 
Choice Groceries, Fine Grade of Teas and 

Coffees, Fresh Country Butter and Eggs 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Penna 

Grover Hefflefinger 

.Shoes Repaired Shoes Shined 
H;.t.s Cleaned 



ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 




I. D. 
BENEMAN'S 

Depl. Store 
MT. JOV. - PA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



THE 

$1.00 a Year 



''ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD' 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 



Sample Copies Free 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PBNNA. 



Willoiv Grove 

Poultry Farm 

Emblem and Toulouse Geese, Indian Runner 

Ducks, Rose Combed Rhode Island 

Red Chickens 

STOCK FOR SALE AND EGGS IN SEASON 

DUROC JERSEY RED HOGS 

J. B. ALDINGER, 

R. D. No. 1. Elizabethtown, Pa. 



GUY COCHNAUER'S 

Up-to-Date Shaving Parlor 

South Market St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



CENTRAL MEAT 



MARKET 



AJl Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



ELIZABETHTOWN 



Poorman's Bakery 

Choice Bread, Rolls & Cakes 

HUMMELSrOWN ST. 




S. B. KIEFER 

Notary Public 

Insurance, Real Kstate and Collections 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PBNNA. 

\ GEoTATinSHER^ 

HARDWARE 



Automobiles 
U ) 1 > J r aphs a nd 
Records 
F. P. GAS PLANTS 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



P [Mfjl P Dry Goods, Notions, Foot 



S. Market & Bainbridge Stfl. 
ELIZABETHTOWN. - PA. 



Wear, Carpets, Linoleums 
and Oil Cloths 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



Fashionable 

COLUMBIAN 

:; Plymouth Rocks 

THE UTILITY BEAUTY BREED. 
i, BREITIGAN'S REGAL STRAIN 

True Plymouth Rock and Light 
Brahma crosses reduced to the 
modern fishionable "Rock" type 
and size, resulting in constitutional 
strength and vigor and wonderful 
laying qualities. X 

Kggs and stock for season, .f. 
Write for illustrated circulnr and 4. 
Mating list. * 

* * 

James H. Breitigan | 

ox CT. LITITZ. PENNA. % 



D. C. BRINSER 



Coal 



Grain, Flour, Feed, < 
Seeds, Hay, Straw > 
and Fertilizer. s 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

Rheems, - - Pa. 




Wenn Sie zu Stadt tommen auf dem 
Blitzwagen oder auf dem Eisenbahn, bit- 
ten wir Sie fur ein Stieck zer Erfriesch- 
ung. Das Nissley Zimmer hat schnelle 
Zubereitungen. 

14-16 Kesten Strasze, 
LANCASTER, PA. 



WE ARE AFTER YOU 
c^TVIR. cTVIAN 

We want you for a customer, so we 
tempt you with a store full of uncommon 
values. Come and bee them. Sooner 
or later you are going to (ind out the 
advantage of quality, service and price, 
to be obtained here. The sooner you 
do it the better it will be for vou. 



Vl/ 



m 




^t 



Our customers are all pleased custom- 
ers, because we really stand back of 
everything we sell. 



MARTIN 

Clothier and Furnisher 

BLIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



32 Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



ItHE ^ BOOK ^ STORE I 



Q 



i:^ 



Sunday School Supplies 

and Mottoes 

Mail Orders Solicited 



« Books, Stationery, School 

« Supplies and Post 

«i Cards 

I 

I C. N. FALKENSTEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. l 

IPatntitiQ anb Ipaper 
H^anotn^ 

AMOS B. DRACE 

J. M. BENNER 

FREIGHT, BAGGAGE and EXPRESS 
Furniture, Pianos, Machinery 

PLATE GLASS A SPECIALTY 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



f^ ' ^ 

S. G. GRAYBILL 


S^ 


College Hill Dairy 


Fresh milk and cream daily. .All milk 
tested for children; free from'tul'erculosis 


\J^ HOTELS AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED J 



zA. W. MARTIN 

COAL, WOOD. GRAIN 
FLOUR and FEED 



Telephone 
ELIZ.4BETHTOWN. 



TAKE YOURo 

Laundry to Fisher's 



Leaves everv Tuesday and Thur 
Returns Wednesday and Frida 


day moruin){. 
y afternoon. 


J. RALPH GROSS 


[[ THE B.\RBER j] 


ELIZ.iBETHTOWX, 


PENNA. 



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O. N. HEISEY I 

Provisions, Groceries, CBi Choice Candies 1 



■^ HEfSEY BriI>DING KLIZABE}THTOWN, - PENNA, >■